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IDENTITY 






Taps 2012 
Volume 102 




Editor-in-Chief 
Alec Gibson f 




Co-Managing Editors 
Brittany Bundrick 
& Katie Simmons 



-------------- 




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Academics 82 

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Underclassmen 238 

Greeks 

and Organizations 332 

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1A£MS0N UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



Table of Contents H I 3 



Identity is not something that can be easily defined, nor is it something that remains 
the same as time passes. When we are young, we continually re-define ourselves and 
adapt to the changing world by adjusting our perspectives. The years spent in college 
are essential to the process of forging one's identity and serve as a bridge connecting 
childhood to adulthood. It is during college that we learn to be independent, learn 
to think and act for ourselves, and gain a better understanding of our place in the 
world. Whether we acknowledge it or not, Clemson University plays an integral role 
in the development of our identities. The knowledge we gain through classes and 
other academic endeavors provides us with a strong foundation upon which our future 
careers are constructed; however, we leave Clemson with much more than knowledge. 
The experiences we share and the bonds we form allow us to grow as individuals, and it 
is that growth that allows each student to become a truly unique person. 
The 102 nd volume of Taps exemplifies the various forms of identity present at Clemson 
University. Clemson itself has an identity 7 , an image that resonates with each and every 
student who walks across campus, studies in the library, attends sporting events, and 
wears orange on Fridays. Whether it be the tiger paw, the iconic image of Tillman 
Hall, or the U C" recognized by alumni everywhere, representations of Clemson serve 
to remind us of our years as students and of the impression left on us during that 
time. These images seen throughout this yearbook serve as symbols of Clemson's 
identity and showcase the memorable aspects of our alma mater. While the identity of 
the University has a dramatic impact on our development, each student has a unique 
identity that is nurtured over the course of our college years. 

This yearbook celebrates the diversity of Clemson students, their individual identities, 
and the ways that our University shapes those identities. Most of us enter college as 
teenagers with a limited understanding of the world and ourselves. As the semesters 
progress we mature and transform into adults ready to contribute to society; in 
addition, we realize who we are as individuals and discover the niche into which we fit. 
It is during our tenure at Clemson that we discover the people we will become and the 
passions that bring us happiness. We prepare to leave our mark on the world, to make 
a difference in the lives of others and bring about a change in society. We form long- 
lasting friendships and gain essential knowledge that will allow us to succeed in our 
endeavors. Clemson allows us to form and solidify our identities, and because of that 
we can become the innovators and leaders of the future. Our identities tell the world 
who we are, and Clemson University provides us with an environment that allows us to 
figure out who we are. 



• . « -J** 



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Senior Staff 



Gibson 

Brittany Bundrick 

Katie Simmons 

Joshua Kelly 

Anna Lauren Meeks 

Amber Day 

Allison Kennamer 

Becca Ready 

Keelia Faber 

Kelsey Lundstrom 

Katherine Williams 

Lukas Hannon 



..... Co-Managing Editor 

Co-Managing Editor & Layout Editor 

Photography Editor (Fall) 

Photography Editor (Spring) 

Copy Editor 

Student Life Editor 

Academics Editor 

Athletics Editor (Fall) 

Athletics Editor (Spring) 

Greeks and Organizations Editor 

Portraits Editor 



Junior Staff 






Yahaira Aleman 

Lauren Beretich 

Matthew Bickford 

Anna Bokman 

Camlin Cothran 

Lauren Dailcy 

Megan Davis 

Samantha Defino 

Alix Drye 

Olivia Elswick 

Andre Friedman 

Devin Gibson 



Katie Guest 

Fa tenia Hakimji 

Kellie Hawkins 

Kevin Heim brook 

Courtney Jones 

Carson Kohler 

Taylor Naquin 

Morgan Robinson 

Schuyler Tin 

Cody Whitelock 

Jodi Williams 

Averie Wood 









saatii 




STUDENT LIEE 




TV /ew 

/Vbe< 



beginnings 



By: Devin Gibson 
junior Staff 



After a long summer filled with excitement 
and anticipation, thousands of incoming 
freshmen and transfer students poured onto 
Clemson's campus to experience their first days as 
true Tigers. The purpose of orientation at Clemson 
University is to bring new students together in 
fellowship while also preparing them for their 
new lives as college students. Parents joined their 
children as the orientation ambassadors provided 
tours of the campus and informed them of the 
experiences they would have over the next couple 
of days. 

The first part of orientation began with splitting up 
students into small groups, each assigned to their 
own orientation ambassador. The ambassadors 
gave the students tours of certain areas of campus, 



engaged them in fun games, answered any 
questions the students had, and tried to make 
them feel welcome as they made the transition 
into this new lifestyle. Later that night the students 
participated in a social located in the Student 
Union where they could meet other new students 
and relax after a long day. Bright and early the next 
day, students concluded part one of the orientation 
by registering for their fall semester classes. 

Part two of orientation began after freshmen 
move-in on August 20. Freshmen and transfer 
students entered into their specific welcome groups 
with whom they went to Convocation, President's 
Picnic, summer reading discussion, organizations 
fair, and many other events designed to welcome 
them into the Clemson family. 



ti 




Orientation 




Orientation | 




NEW FRIENDS, NEW FACES 
After having spent all day miving into their new 
dorms, the freshmen gather on Bowman Field 
to rest, have fun, and meet new people.Photo b> 

Photo by Anna Lauren Mcefes 




Freshman Move-In 



A fresh 
/A start 



By: Kellie Hawkins 
Junior Staff 



Freshman move-in day was a great success 
this year, as it is every year. Beginning at 8 
a.m., Clemson students and staff from various 
organizations gathered at the different freshman 
dorms around campus, awaiting the arrival of 
the new students. Fully-loaded vehicles steadily 
streamed through the Horseshoe, Clemson House, 
Johnstone, and the Shoeboxes. To the surprise of 
many new students and parents, members of the 
Clemson family were at their service. 

As parents and students stepped out of their cars, 
the Clemson volunteers unpacked everything and 
carried it up to the new students' dorm rooms. This 
allowed parents to park their cars in the nearest 
parking lot so that other cars driving through could 
quickly have their things unloaded as well. This 



method created ease and organization for both 
the volunteers and the new families. Having the 
volunteers unpack the cars gave the new students 
more time to get to know their roommates, become 
acclimated to their surroundings, and decorate their 
rooms without spending time making multiple trips 
back to the car to finish unloading. 

With over 3,000 new freshmen, move-in day would 
not have been such a success without the help of all 
of the volunteers from different organizations on 
campus. It really showed how great our Clemson 
family is and how willing we are to welcome new 
students and help them in any way possible. The 
smiles and expressions of gratitude on the new faces 
oi Clemson were great rewards for all of the hard- 
workers. 




HEAVY LOAF) 

Students and parents work hard to- move 

the plethora of furniture, electronics, and 

appliances into dorms and apartments. 

Photo by Joshua Kelly 



Freshman Move-In 



7/|/Blcome 

back 



By: Aver ie Wood, 
Junior Staff 



The extreme heat couldn't stop the 
town of Clemson from celebrating 
the return of its University's wonder- 
ful student body by holding the 23rd 
annual Welcome Back Festival. This 
year's festival took place on August 22nd 
from 5:30 to 8:00 pm. The festival was 
preceded by Tiger Prowl, and followed by 
the Bowman Block Party. 
The festival consisted of raffles, samples 
from local restaurants, and free giveaways 
from over 60 local businesses. Tickets 
could be purchased for fifty cents each, 
and they were then used to buy various 
discounted items. In the middle of it 
all was the Tiger Band, Clemson Tiger 



ers, Clemson Mayor Butch Trent, and 
President Barker himself. Other special 
guest speakers included the new men's 
and women's basketball coaches Brad 
Brownell and Itoro Umoh Coleman, 
men's soccer Coach Mike Noonan, 
student body president Ryan Duane, 
and Student Alumni Council president 
Rhett Ricard. 

The Clemson Student Alumni Council 
sponsored the festival with all proceeds 
going to the Student Alumni Council 
Endowment Fund. Over the last five 
years the event has raised a very impres- 
sive $55,150 for the fund. With all this, 
our Tigers were definitely welcomed 



Mascots, Rally Cats, Clemson cheerlead- Back! 





SHOP AROUND TOWN 

Students walk away from the Welcome Back 
Festival with bags of goodies from local venders 
who were given the opportunity to advertise their 
businesses to students. 
Photo by Joshua Kelly 



Welcome Back Festival 



GETTING INVOLVED 

Groups such as the IPTAY 

Collegiate Club gave students 

the opportunity to sign up as 

they made their way around the 

festival. 

Photo by Joshua Kelly 



SHAKEN' THE SOUTHLAND 

Tiger Band joins in the fun, rallying 
those in attendance with the playing 
of Tiger Rag. 
Photo fry Joshua Kelly 




Welcome Back Festival fl I 13 




WELCOMING BACK, SISTERS 

After much anticipation, the women of Zeta 
Tan Alpha gladly welcome their new memhe 
class and welcome hack their Pi Chi's. 
Photo fry Joshua Kelly 



'4 I ■ Fall Recruitment 




ushing to 



be greek 



By: Katherine Williams 
Greeks and Organizations Editor 



The start of the new school year included new 
books, supplies, clothes, meal plans, and for 
those who wished, the chance to participate in 
Greek life at Clemson. All of these factors made for 
a hectic first couple of weeks. 

On August 25th, hundreds of women made their 
way to Littlejohn Coliseum tor the first round of 
Panhellenic recruitment. Over six days they met 
with eleven different sororities, narrowed down 
their choices, voted on their favorite sorority, and 
waited to join them on Bowman Field for Bid Day 
2011. 

"Panhellenic Recruitment is something that I look 
forward to every year. While some may say I'm crazy, 



the work involved is definitely worth it. Recruitment 
gives you time to reconnect with your sisters and 
meet potential new members that will help you and 
your chapter grow, " said senior Hope Snipes. 

For the men, recruitment began on August 28th 
with "smokers" that took place on Bowman Field. 
From there the different fraternities met with men 
at invite dinners, meet and greets, and other social 
events. The men received their bids on September 
2nd. "IFC rush helps these young men in their 
growth as individuals and helps add to the quality 
members already in each fraternity. A large number 
of high quality men decided to begin the process 
of being Greek at Clemson University," said Alpha 
Sigma Phi President, Richard Hanson. 




Fall Recruitment 



A WINNER IS CROWNED 

Hillary Gruce was crowned Miss First 

Friday 2011. She had the honor of 

riding in the parade, representing not 

only her sorority, Sigma Kappa, hut the 

entire student body of Clemson. 

Photo bs Cody Whitelock 



TO THE GOAL 

"The soccer game was intense. It was 
great to see all the support for our team 
against USC," exclaims student Allison 

Kennamer. 

Photo [■>>' Morgan Robinson 




First Friday 




irst = 
friday 



History repeated itself Friday, September 2nd 
at Clemson's annual First Friday Parade. 
This parade marked the beginning of the football 
season and the first home game. The Tigers 
opened their season with a 43-19 win against the 
Troy Trojans. 



Sponsored by Central Spirit, this year's theme 
was History WILL Repeat Itself, in reference 
to the 30th anniversary of Clemson football's 
national championship win. For the first time 
the parade was preceded with games, music, and 
inflatable rides on Bowman Field. Over fifty 
organizations, including Tiger Band, participated 
in the festivities. The parade ran from the 
President's Home on Cherry Road all of the way 
to Williamson Road. The day's events concluded 



By: Olivia Elswick, 
Junior Staff 

with a soccer game at Historic Riggs Field. There 
was a record breaking crowd of students, alumni, 
and fans in attendance who cheered the Tigers on 
to a 2-0 victory over USC. 

Twelve sororities joined in the parade, and 
Sigma Kappa sorority was the big winner of 
the night. They came in first place in the float 
competition and were given a check to aid in 
their philanthropy efforts, and a Sigma Kappa 
sister was crowned Miss First Friday. Gamma Phi 
Beta sorority came in second place in the float 
competition. Judge Gary Barnes, former Clemson 
football starter and professional player who was 
best known for his record-breaking touchdown 
reception in the 1959 Bluebonnet Bowl, served as 
Grand Marshal of the parade. 





SISTERLY SPIRIT 

Several sororities participate in the events with 
cheers, floats, and school spirit. 
Photo b-y Cody Whitdock 



WE'VE GOT THE BEAT 

Drummers from Clemson's Tiget Band get the 
crowd moving to the beat of Tiger Rag. 



First Friday 



L 




I Tigerama 




hrough the 
eyes of a tiger 



By: Allison Kennamer 
Student Lite Editor 



Tigerama has become yet another great 
tradition here at Clemson University. 
This year Blue Key proudly presented the 
55th installment of the enthusiastic event. 
The organization came up with a great 
theme, "Through the Eyes of a Tiger", which 
encouraged tans to reflect on what Clemson has 
meant to them throughout the years. 

Acting as the pep rally for the Homecoming 
football game that followed the next day, 
Tigerama really did a splendid job of pepping 
up an already lively group of tans. Hundreds 
of people were in attendance at Littlejohn 
Coliseum to watch the exciting events planned 



for the night, which were all coordinated to 
reflect the theme. Jane Robelot and Col. Sandy 
Edge, both alumni of the University, were 
honored to act as emcees for the evening's 
festivities. President and Mrs. Barker and Dabo 
Swinney were some other members of the 
Clemson family who made appearances. 

Performers of the night included the 
cheerleaders, Rally Cats, Tiger Band, the 
Pershing Rifles team, Tigeroar, and even the 
football team and Greek Life members who 
performed skits. The whole evening literally went 
out with a bang when it was concluded with a 
very exciting and brilliant fireworks display. 




Tigerama | 





Joshua Kelly 




I 






VJMS 




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20 



Homecoming 






ZTye of 
^the tiger 



Clemson has always been known for its 
traditions and homecoming weekend is 
definitely ranked highly among all of them. 
Besides the pageant itself, there are so many 
things that go into making homecoming weekend 
a success year after year. Not only is this an 
exciting time for students, but the community 
also comes together to enjoy all of the festivities. 
Homecoming kicked off when the fraternities 
and sororities started building their larger-than- 
life tloats on Bowman Field during the week. The 
field really came alive with students during this 
building process. A lot of time and dedication 
went into making each float unique and it was 
rewarding for everyone to be able to see the 
finished products. This year's overall float winners 
were Phi Delta Theta and Alpha Chi Omega. 



By: Kelsey Lundstrom 

junior Staff 



After posing for a picture with the floats, fans 
headed to the homecoming football game that 
took place during the weekend as well. Clemson 
was packed during this weekend and students 
invited family and friends to visit. As all Tiger fans 
know, football season is an exciting past time, but 
this particular weekend is always extra thrilling. 
This year, Clemson took on Boston College and 
won with a final score of 36-14. Clemson's record 
was boosted to 7-0 after this game. This win was 
just an added bonus to an overall great weekend. 

The winner of the homecoming pageant, Miss 
Hannah Caviness, was announced during the 
football game at halftime. She rode on a float 
around the stadium for all the fans, students, and 
faculty to congratulate. 




Homecoming 




22 I I Family Weekend 




hree 
t's 



By: Katie Guest 
Junior Staff 



Clemson's annual Family Weekend celebrated 
the three T's: Tailgating, Togetherness, and 
the Tigers. Parents, siblings and students poured 
into Clemson on September 24, 2011, to watch the 
Tigers beat the Florida State University Seminoles. 
Before entering the game, families spent the day 
in the hot sun tailgating. Then it was time to head 
to Death Valley to watch #21 Clemson beat #11 
Florida State. On Florida State's last offensive play, 
it was #94, Rennie Moore Jr., who made the final 
sack, allowing Clemson to run out the clock for a 
35-30 win. 

Along with watching a winning game, families 
also got to see what life was like at Clemson for 
their sons and daughters. On Friday, the Cooper 
Library and the other academic colleges opened 



their doors to families and students, allowing 
parents and siblings to meet the deans and various 
professors. The Parents Council was also very 
involved in making Family Weekend a success. 
They organized a tailgate at Littlejohn Coliseum 
before the game, which brought families together 
for some food and fun. T-shirts were given out to 
those who participated in the weekend's events. 
Sororities also welcomed parents and siblings 
of Greek students with open arms; they hosted 
cocktail hours and luncheons. 

When Sunday rolled around, good-byes were 
exchanged, and families left Clemson, South 
Carolina with full stomachs, winning smiles, and 
memories to last a lifetime. 




A STROLL ON THE BRIDGE 

For many parents, Family Weekend 

is an opportunity to introduce their 

children to their alma mater. 

Photo try Becca Ready 



Family Weekend 



L 



TRUE TRADITION 

Cocky's Funeral has been a tradition 

for many years at Clemson and never 

fails to impress and excite students and 

Clemson fans alike. 

Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 



Motivational speeches are an essential 

part of Cocky's Funeral and are a great 

way to get students pumped-up. 

Photo by Joshua Kelley 

MARCHING IN 




return 




The ongoing rivalry between South 
Carolina's two largest universities, Clemson 
University and the University of South Carolina, 
is arguably the most ingrained tradition in the 
state's culture. Thousands of fans across the 
state gather every year on the Saturday after 
Thanksgiving tor the traditional rivalry game. 
Before the big game, both schools hold pep 
rallies to get the excitement stirring; Clemson's 
annual Black Friday celebration includes a 
funeral and cremation of Cocky, the USC 
mascot, led by Col. Sandy Edge, former Air 
Force ROTC commander. This year was no 
different as the Colonel ceremoniously ordered 
Cocky's burning in a 55-gallon barrel after a 
traditional military procession. President James 
Barker also encouraged fans to cheer the team to 



By: Becca Ready, 

Academics Editor 

victory as the a cappella group Tiger Roar led the 
crowd in singing the Tiger Rag fight song. 

Another way the rivalry is celebrated is through 
the Blood Bowl held every year between the two 
schools, as they compete to see which school can 
give more blood to the American Red Cross and 
how many lives each can save. This was the 27th 
annual drive and USC just passed the Tigers 
with 4,079 units of blood over Clemson's 3,041 
units. Historically, Clemson has been in the 
lead with 14 wins over USC's 13. Though the 
South Carolina rivalry is intense throughout the 
state, there are no losers when it comes to saving 
over 180,000 estimated lives over the past 27 
years! 




HAPPY TO HELP 

Clemson students show their willingness to help 
others and they joy they get from doing so. 



Black Friday and Blood Bowl 



25 




I I Clemson vs. USC 




hree 
n a row 



One of the greatest and most heated rivalries 
in the nation is the one in which the Tigers 
from Clemson University and the Gamecocks from 
University of South Carolina are pitted against one 
another in a battle tor state bragging rights. This 
classic match-up has given college football fans such 
unforgettable moments as "The Prank" and "The 
Catch." Everyone knew that this year's face-off 
would be just as action packed and memorable as 
those that have come before. With both Clemson 
and USC having such exciting football seasons in 
201 1, everyone was sure that the game would be a 
thrilling battle. 

During the course of the game there were several 



By: Allison Kennamer 

Student Life Editor 

electrifying moments that came from the Tigers on 
both offense and defense; Tajh Boyd threw his 28th 
touchdown pass of the season, breaking the previous 
Clemson single season record held by Cullen 
Harper. Also, Andre Branch had two sacks during 
the night, leading him to tie for fourth place in 
school history for single season sacks. Despite these 
individual milestones, the team did not come out 
on top. Clemson lost to USC for the third year in a 
row with a score of 34-13. But at the end of the day, 
in true Tiger fashion, all the Clemson fans could be 
heard saying, "Just wait until next year." And that's 
just what we will do - wait in anticipation for the 
next football season to roll around when the Best in 
the State can once ayain be determined on the field. 




Clemson vs. USC 



/yailgating 

£ T I ^>i f\ ^r By: Allison Kenna 



tigers 



By: Allison Kennamer 

Student Life Editor 



With the beginning of each 
football season, Tiger fans get 
geared up to host some of the most 
impressive tailgates in all of college 
football. Clemson has always been 
associated with its great pre-game 
tailgating atmosphere. 

This year's participation was exciting 
as usual. There were cars, trucks, 
and RVs that covered campus; 
some arrived days in advance in 
anticipation of the massive amounts 
of people that would arrive on game 
day. When Saturday finally rolled 
around, laughing and cheering fans 
could be found on every inch of 
Clemson's campus. Many people 





insisted on maintaining their 
tailgating traditions, some of which 
included anything from special foods 
that had to be present, such as the 
superstitious example of fried chicken 
to the popular games like corn-hole 
and ladder ball. 

It was also a usual practice for fans 
to gather along the road from the 
amphitheater to the stadium to watch 
the band as they marched proudly 
into the stadium. Another great 
tradition for fans to join in was the 
Tiger Walk in which the football 
players were welcomed into the West 
End Zone by the rest of Tiger Nation. 



A LITTLE PRE-GAMING 

Fans enjoy using every part of 
Clemson's campus to have a little 
fun on game day. 
Photo b} Becca Ready 



28 



m. 



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GETTING TO THE GAME 

Dressed in their orange, fans make their way to the 
game. On foot is usually the easiest way for most 
students who live nearby to get there. 

Photo fry Becca Ready 



1 



Tailgating 









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DEDICATION 

Some groups of fans hold the 
same tailgating spots every year 
and even give themselves names. 
Photo b} Becca Ready 









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STAYING UPDATED 

Many fans like to bring their TV's 
with them to keep up with the 
other games going on that day. 
Photo by Becca Ready 

PERFECT AIM 

For some people, the great game 
of corn-hole is an art form, with 
precise aim taken in every toss. 
Photo b^ Becca Ready 



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Tailgating | 1 29 



c 



elebrate 
MLK- — = 



By: Courtney Jones 

Junior Staff 



Clemson University staff and students 
come together to celebrate Martin 
Luther King Jr., with a week of events each 
year, showing their respect to this historical 
leader. "Dedicated to the Dream" was the 
theme of this year's events which started 
with the ^Oth annual Commemorative 
Service. President Barker and his wife are 
seen as an active part of this event each 
year, while Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity- 
was responsible for organizing the service. 
The service was packed full of great 
speakers and performances such as keynote 
speaker, Harry E. Johnson Sr., Esq., who 
made a passionate and moving speech. 
Take Note and the Gospel Choir also 
gave outstanding performances. Later in 



the week, all members oi the Clemson 

Community were invited to attend the 

Diversity Dialogue: Voices oi the Tiger. 

Students and adults ot a wide variety of 

races mix and mingled in a comfortable 

and non-judgmental environment. Here 

they could share with each other their 

views on race and other related subjects. 

_ i 
At the end of the week, everyone was 

invited to walk through the "Tunnel 

of Oppression" where each person 

experienced first hand what it felt like 

to be discriminated against. From actors 

demonstrating prejudice to everyone, 

regardless of their race, people learned the 

power that prejudiced words can really 

have. 





AWARDED FOR SERVICE 

President Barker hands out the MLK service 
awards at the Commemorative Service. 
Photo by Courtney Jones 



Martin Luther King Jr. Day 



SEE THE LIGHT IN DARK 

The Tunnel of Oppression shows 
what it is like to be discriminated 
against and how hurtful 
prejudices can he. 
Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 



RAISE YOUR VOICE 

The women's a capella group Take 
Note gives a great performance at 
the Service. 
Photo by Courtney ]ones 




Martin Luther King Jr Day 



B 



est of 

breaks 



By: 



Without a doubt, all Clemson students 
love their school; but, they also love the 
breaks from school that occur throughout the year. 
The 2011-2012 school year began in August, so 
everyone was ready tor a short vacation by October. 
Fall break was on October 17th and 18th. Some 
students went home to visit family and some stayed 
in Clemson or went on trips o\ their own. It was 
the perfect amount of time off until it was time to 
go home for Thanksgiving, a three-day break that 
began on November 2 3rd. After Thanksgiving, 
final exams were pretty much the only thing left 
Standing in between student and their beloved 
winter break. For over three weeks, Clemson wis 
empty after students dispersed across the country 



Lauren Dailey 
Junior Staff 

and back to their families or as they went off on 
exciting vacations. 

On January 11th, students began the spring 
semester, refreshed and ready to work. However, 
after just a few days of class, Clemson gave 
everyone a long weekend to celebrate Martin 
Luther King, Jr. Day. Finally, the last break of the 
school year, the most anticipated spring break, was 
from March 19th to the 23rd. Most students used 
this week to celebrate the end of winter, going to 
beaches and tropical places with friends. Luckily, 
spring break falls right in the middle of the 
semester, so there is only about a month left before 
summer begins. 





34 ■ | Class Change 



1AR8U YflBfBVtfrfU tf08M3JO 




me in 
between 



By: Lauren Dailey, 
junior Staff 






Class change at Clemson is never dull. 
Campus is constantly covered with people 
and there is always something happening on the 
Library Bridge. Students rush from one side of 
campus to the other, or just leisurely make their 
way from Brackett to Daniel. With all of the daily 
excitement on campus, those fifteen minutes are 
never just for walking to class. 

During class change, you can pretty much 
guarantee that you will run into a friend (or two, 
or several!) in the mass of people on the Library 
Bridge. Some students stop in the library to print 
papers and do last minute homework while others 
grab a quick coffee from Java City or a bagel 



from Einstein's. Even though going to class on 
Fridays is a drag, seeing all of the orange around 
campus and getting a high five on the bridge from 
the "High Five Club" makes it more exciting. 
Students also spend their time between classes 
in the amphitheater getting some sun, reading, 
eating, or just catching up with the Facebook 
world. Also, there are couches and places to relax 
in almost every academic building on campus. 

No one ever has a problem keeping busy during 
class change. Whether you live on-campus or off, 
Clemson's incredible campus accommodates 
every student's needs and makes the school days 
more enjoyable. 




CLEMSON UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



Cpeak 

E 



ver since I first started looking at 
Clemson as a prospective school 
almost two years ago, I took note of 
how many opportunities it gave its 
students to expand their horizons 
through speakers and educational 
programs. During my time as a student 
here, I have attended many or these 
speakers' presentations personally. 

Whether it be government officials, 
notable performers, old professors, 
or political figures, Clemson invites 
representatives from all sorts of 
backgrounds to come and speak on 
its campus. Two recently featured 
speakers on Clemson's campus were 
Scott Pelley, an anchor from CBS 





By: Anna Bokman, 
Junior Staff 

Evening News, and Dr. Lori Hart, 
a noted motivational speaker for 
students involved in Greek life. These 
two leaders are among many who 
share their inspiring words of wisdom 
with students here at Clemson, and 
they were both extremely well-received 
(Hart in particular had upwards of 100 
students in her audience). 

Perhaps the greatest part about these 
on-campus speakers is that no matter 
what, there will always be something 
to fit everyone's interests. Next time 
you're looking to learn a little more 
outside of the typical classroom setting, 
give one Clemson's featured speakers 
a try! 



VARIETY 

Speakers from all over the world come to Clemson . 
to give talks and presentations, which allows 
students and faculty to attend a variety of seminars. 
Photo by Fatema Hakimji 



MOTIVATIONAL 

Dr. Lori Hart speaks to her 
audience about various aspects 
of Greek life and the important 
aspects of such involvement. 
Photo by Andre Friedman 




Speakers 




ger= 
tiaras 



By: Megan Davis, 
Junior Staff 



Clemson University hosted three 
main pageants this year in order 
to showcase its young women and 
give them a chance to represent the 
University. In the tall, football season 
was kicked off with the First Friday 
Parade. Miss First Friday was chosen 
by the student body, and this year, 
Miss Hillary Gruce representing Sigma 
Kappa sorority was crowned as Miss 
First Friday 2011. 

During Homecoming week, twenty- 
one Clemson ladies competed in the 
Mi^s Homecoming pageant. These 
women represented many student 
organizations throughout Clemson's 
campus. The judges narrowed it down 



to the top ten, then the student body 
voted to choose the winner. Miss 
Hannah Caviness was crowned Miss 
Homecoming 2011. 

In the spring of 2011, the Mortar 
Board sponsored the Miss Clemson 
University pageant. The eighteen 
contestants were judged an their . i 
interview, talent, evening gown, and 
an on-stage question. Miss Morgan 
Milano was crowned Miss Clemson 
University 2011. Milano represented 
Alpha Delta Pi sorority, and as Miss 
Clemson University she was given the 
opportunity to serve on the Student 
Affairs Advisory Board, which was a 
huge honor for any Clemson student. 






THE RESULTS ARE IN 

Contestants from the Miss Homecoming pageant 

anxiously await the judge's decision of the top ten. 

Photo by Fatema Hakimji 



Pageant: 



AND THE WINNER IS... 

At rhe always exciting and 
entertaining Tigerama program 
the top 5 contestants are 
announced; with Miss Hannah 
Caviness being crowned Miss 
Homecoming 2011. 
Photo by Joshua Kelly 



KICKING OFF THE YEAR 

The winner of Miss First Friday, 
Miss Hillary Gruce, rides along in 
the annual First Friday Parade. 
Photo rry Cody Whitelock 




Pageants 



A FULL HOUSE 

After classes are out for the day, one 

can break a sweat merely looking for a 

spot to work out. 

Photo by Becca Ready 




IT? art i 

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it up 



ng 



By: Becca Ready, 

Academics Editor 



Of all the spots on campus frequented 
by students, Fike Recreation Center is 
definitely ranked among the most popular. The 
on-campus gym is decked out with numerous 
facilities for exercising, including an indoor track, 
basketball and racquetball courts, a weight lifting 
area, abundant varieties of workout equipment, 
and a climbing wall. The latest addition to 
the gym's collection of exercise arenas is the 
"Ladies Only" area located on the second floor 
of Fike. The newly renovated area includes new 
equipment arranged in a circular pattern, giving 
ladies an opportunity to be social while getting in 
their daily workout routine. In addition, Fike is 
now under construction where the old swimming 
and diving pools have traditionally stood. 
Beginning on April 30, 2010, Clemson athletics 



began a two-year phase out of men's swimming 
and diving and women's swimming to end at the 
end of the 2011-2012 academic year due to a lack 
of an Olympic size pool and the inability to be 
competitive in the ACC, as well as nationally. Fike 
took a hit in this initiative with the remodeling 
of its aquatic facilities. Despite these changes, 
Fike remains a prevalent gathering spot across the 
spectrum of the student population. "The most 
popular time to be here seems to be around 10:00 
at night!" commented Jacqueline Green, a second 
year employee. On the flip side, Scott Cely, a 
second year transfer student said, "Working out 
early with the guys is one of my favorite ways to 
begin the day." No matter year or background, 
Fike is the place for Tigers who enjoy working out 
and staying in shape! 



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wo friends encourage each other to »i 
nape as (hey lift weights together. 
'fioto liy Becca Recuh 



\ 



REACH FOR THE SKY 

Clemson student Michael Chickene has second 
thoughts about his foot grip as he attempts to climb 
the rock wall. 



Fike 



L 




42 ■ I CLEMSONLiVE 



eepin' 
it alive 



By: Carson Kohler 
junior Staff 



CLEMSONLiVE is one of Clemson's premier 
on-campus organizations. It prides itself 
on being entertaining, diverse, and adaptable to 
students' requests. The organization's main focus 
is to offer students the best experience possible 
while attending the University and to provide 
memories that can be looked back upon for a 
lifetime. "The overall aim of CLEMSONLiVE 
is to provide the avenues for students to make 
their Clemson memories," states current 
CLEMSONLiVE President Mary Mattox. She 
adds, "If we can help [provide the best experience] 
through one event or fifty (events) during each 
student's time here, then we are doing our job." 

Some of the most popular events incluele Bowman 
Block Party to kick off the school year, CU on 
ICE to add some action on skates in the dead of 



December, the World Series of Pop Culture to 
test students' knowledge on popular events and 
people, and Moonlight Breakfast to provide some 
fun in the process of studying during exam week. 

CLEMSONLiVE is constantly changing and 
evolving in order to fit the campus' needs and 
wants. "We strive to keep our events original and 
new so that students always have exciting events to 
attend," asserts Maddox. 

Year after year the organization succeeds in doing 
its job, providing entertainment for students. The 
events on campus always add a little flavor to the 
school year for students between their studies, and 
this has certainly not changed in the 2011-2012 
school year. CLEMSONLiVE will surely continue 
to be a valued tradition at Clemson. 




CLEMSONLiVE 



NEITHER RHYME NOR REASON 

The Clemson Players perform 

Shakespeare's As You Like It. Chris 

explains what is happening in the 

photo: "The picture is of the wrestling 

match in Act I between Orlando and 

Charles. Orlando, the one on the 

ground, actually comes up victorious. 

He wins the girl, they fall in love, and 

it all starts here when she sees him. 

Just goes to show you that fighting 

for a girl's attention isn't a new thing! 

Shakespeare got that. His words cross 

the centuries because he knew how to 

speak the essence of humanity." 

Photo courtesy of Christopher Onken 



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BLENDING TOGETHER 

During rehearsal in Brooks, 

TIGEROAR stands around the grand 

piano in one of the classrooms to 

balance out the acoustics and blend 

their voices as they warm up and sing 

their songs. 

Photo hy Mason Simmons 

TAKE A BOW 

Students perform their rendition 

of Melanie Marnich's These Shining 

Lives. The performing arts team was 

selected to compete regionally and 

took the show to Daytona Beach for 

the Kennedy Center American College 

Theatre Festival in February 2011. 

Photo courtesy of Christopher Onken 



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44 I | Performing Arts 



II the world's 




a stage 

Whenever a student is in the mood for a 
culturally enriched performance, from 
a concert to a play to even an acrobat show, the 
Brooks Center for the Performing Arts is the 
place to go for an extensive array of experiences. 

The Brooks Center is home to groups consisting 
of choral music, instrumental, and dance majors. 
However, many allow for non-majors as well, 
allowing them to pursue an interest and develop 
a talent. Choral groups that require an audition 
for membership include CU Singers, which 
consists of 40-50 men and women, Viva Voce, 
an ensemble of 16 women, and TakeNote and 
TIG E ROAR, which are pop a capella groups for 
women and men, respectively. 



By: Katie Simmons 

Layout Editor 

do not require an audition are Men and Women's 
Glee. These two groups rehearse for months to 
put on a concert with some of the other choral 
groups at the end of each semester, sometimes 
even singing together on certain pieces. 

If one is interested in dance, he or she can see a 
performance by the University Dance Company, 
which holds a annual recital every spring. Within 
the realm of theatre, however, The Clemson 
Players is the student organization that shines 
under the limelight. They perform several times 
throughout the year, as well as travel to various 
parts of the States in order to perform for festivals 
and other shows. 

All the world's a stage at Brooks, providing 
something for everyone. 




SING THE GLORY OF HIS NAME 

The Gospel Choir performs for students and other 
patrons at the Brooks Center. The choir provides a 
more religious aspect of expression in their music 
than the other performing arts groups. 



Performing Arts 



L 



45 




USIC ^ 

for all 



Luke Bryan kicked off the fall 
semester when his Farm tour came 
to Clemson. The show was held at the 
Campus Beach on Sept. 29, 2011. All 
proceeds from Luke's Farm tour went 
toward scholarships for students in 
agricultural studies. 

Those who love alternative style 
rap had an opportunity to see Wale 
in Littlejohn Coliseum along with 
Mimosa, Cyhi Da Prynce, Mansions 
on the Moon and others. Live radio 
broadcasting from Hot 98.1 preceded 
the show. Wale has collaborated with 
hot artists such as Kid Cudi and Rick 
Ross and is becoming a huge success. 





By: Averie Wood, 
Junior Staff 

For a little bit of rock flare, 
Evanescence performed in Littlejohn 
on January 13, 2012. The concert also 
featured opening acts Rival Sons and 
Electric Torch. 

Chevelle also performed in December. 
This alternative-style metal group was 
formed in Chicago in 1995. Since 
then, several members have been 
replaced, but they are as great as ever. 

We must give thanks to Tiger Paw 
Productions for the work they 
contribute towards most of Clemson's 
major events, including concerts. 



A WILD NIGHT 

Clemson students flock to the musical talent that 
performs thoughout the year. 

Photo by Cody Whitelock 



Concerts 






AT THE TOP OF HER 
LUNGS 

Lead singer Amy Lee, along with 
guitarist Ben Moody, founded the 
rock hand Evanescence in Little 
Rock, Arkansas in 1995. Since 
then, they have come a long we 
Whitelock 




HOME AWAY FROM HOME 

Dorm room decorations vary from 

person to person, and creativity 

abounds as students work hard to make 

their spaces unique and comfortable. 

Photo by Joshua Kelly 




Housing 





.F9M 



hange 
is good 



It is safe to say that Clemson University 
has focused a lot of attention on housing 
this year. There have been several changes 
throughout the year in order to improve 
on-campus housing. This year, Clemson 
devised a new system in which housing 
sign-ups were based on class rank, which 
allowed students in the same graduating 
class to sign up at the same time and be 
housed together. The main focus of the 
program was rising sophomores since they 
are the majority of students on-campus 
besides freshmen. Spaces were reserved 
in Lightsey Bridge I and II and Thornhill 
Village tor juniors and seniors. Freshmen 
housing was also improved, and several 
residence halls, such as Clemson House, 
were converted into freshmen dorms. 




By: Katie Guest, 

]unior Staff 

One exciting change that happened 
in housing was Clemson's integration 
housing between students and professors. 
Clemson began putting faculty members in 
the residence programs to bring "outside 
the classroom" learning to its housing 
residents. These teachers dined and lived 
with students and hoped the experience 
would shed new light onto on-campus 
living. Another continued focus was 
Clemson's initiative to be environmentally 
friendly. Clemson planned many contests 
and activities, such as a conservation 
song contest, in order to get on-campus 
students involved in the "go green" efforts. 
With new and improved changes being 
implemented, it was definitely a successful 
year for Clemson housing. 




KITCHEN COOKING 

On-campus apartments are ideal for students 
wanting to put their culinary skills to use. 
Photo by Joshua Kdly 



Housing 



L 



4'J 



Z^oint 
* a to b 



By: Kelsey Lundstrom 

Junior Staff 



The constant increase of students on Clemson 
University's campus is accompanied by an 
influx of vehicles as well. Whether students live on 
or off-campus, parking has always been an issue. 
Parking lots become full quickly and students are 
often forced to hike to class from whatever lot 
in which they eventually find a spot. With this 
ongoing problem, it only seems logical to just hop 
on the CAT bus instead. The CAT (Clemson Area 
Transit) bus provides transportation both to and 
from campus, as well as on-campus transportation 
from parking lots to classroom buildings. 

This year, the CAT bus service made some big 
changes to their schedule and routes to better 
accommodate those who utilize it. The biggest 
change they have made is the addition of the 



new Tiger route on campus. This new route 
loops around the entire campus, providing 
transportation from the east and west parts. There 
are also several other routes, such as the blue, 
green, orange, and purple routes. 

The CAT bus is not the only means of 
transportation used by students. Each day a 
plethora of mopeds and bicycles can be seen on 
the sidewalks of campus, and with special parking 
spaced for motorcycles, mopeds, and bicycles, 
it is no wonder these devices were so popular. 
With a campus that is said to be "uphill in both 
directions," students used any means necessary to 
quickly get from one place to another. Of course, 
when all else failed, there was always the method 
of putting one foot in front of the other. 




LIKE A BLUR 

Students often cruise around on 
their hikes. If you are a pedestrian, 
you better watch out! 
Photo h\ Scan Harding 



50B Transportation 







VROOM VROOM 

Mopeds are becoming increasingly popular 
on Clemson's campus. They serve as a great 
alternative to walking or riding your bike to class 
Photo f>\ Taylor Naquin 








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Fatema Hakim ji 



Transportation H | 5 



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out ' 



Jobs through Clemson University are 
a great opportunity for students to 
be more involved on campus. Campus 
jobs allow for students to create a 
work schedule around class times and 
extracurricular activities. Clemson 
University offers two part-time 
position programs, off-campus and on- 
campus. These jobs offer students the 
opportunity to develop work-related 
and time management skills. 

ClemsonJobLink is an online research 
tool that helps students locate job 
postings in the area. The bookstore, 
ARA Dining Services, Cooper Library, 
Fike Recreation Center, and Tiger 
Paw Productions are departments on 



By: Olivia Elswick 
Junior Staff 

campus that hire many non-work study 
students. Jobs on campus include 
everything from the food industry, 
through jobs such as '55 Exchange, to 
reception and research. The Michelin 
Career Center also helps students 
find jobs to suit their interests and 
schedule. 

Sophomore Kara Wylie says, "Campus 
jobs are great because most employers 
are willing to work around our class 
schedules. Making money between 
classes is perfect for us college 
students. We can occasionally upgrade 
from Ramen noodles and splurge on 
some El Jimador or Cookout." 



/ 




HOMEMADE 

Candice at '55 Exchange serves a 
customer butter pecan ice cream. 

Photo hy Olivia Elswick 



mk 



52 ]| Campus Jobs 



TECH TALK 

A Clemson CCIT employee helps 
a student with their computer. 
Photo by Olivia Elswick 



"HOW MAY I HELP YOU?" 

A student answers the phone at 
Barnes and Noble on campus. 
Photo by Olivia Elswick 




o 



ut on 
the town 



By: Lauren Dailey 
junior Staff 



If you need something to do, downtown Clemson 
is the place to go! Students, faculty, and visitors 
spend time shopping for Clemson apparel and 
merchandise at stores like TigerTown Graphics, 
Mr. Knickerbockers, and for the ladies, boutiques 
like Two Sisters (they accept Tigerstripe!) and 
Entourage to find the season's best looks. If you 
are hungry, downtown offers a huge variety of 
restaurants too. Peppino's and Todaro's serve pizza 
and you can find any kind of sandwich you want 
at Groucho's, Firehouse, or The Burger Joint, and 
there is even Mexican at Moe's or pasta at Brioso. 
Students can also take a study break and have 
dessert at Spill the Beans or Blueberry Frog. At 
night, downtown Clemson turns into a completely 
different place. On any night of the week, you can 
find tons of people at Tiger Town Tavern, Loose 



Change, TD's, or any of the other bars downtown, 
singing karaoke, playing trivia or bingo, dancing, or 
just drinking that night's specials. There is always 
something to do downtown. 

During football season, fans come together in an 
orange frenzy for shopping and a good time. All 
the attractions are entertaining, of course, but 
it is the atmosphere and the people that make it 
a worthwhile place to spend time. Students and 
alumni alike love the overall look and feel of the 
old buildings and the traditions of downtown, 
which are an important part of Clemson University 
as a whole. Downtown Clemson will always be an 
iconic part of this college town, and it is definitely 
a fun place to be where you are guaranteed to run 
into old friends or even make new ones. 



J 




54 HI Downtown 




flHK/RWfcS 



Anna Lauren Meeks 



Downtown I H 55 




A CLEMSON TREAT 

The '55 Exchange is a great place tor 
a nice treat, whether it he ice cream, 
a smoothie, or a wedge of cheese. 

Photo r>> ! Joshua Kclh 



J 



56 1| Dining 



ZTati 
cZ\u 



ating 



it up 



By: Olivia Elswick 
junior Staff 



Clemson University offered a wide array of 
dining options for students and faculty. 
Dining services knew that variety is crucial, so 
they ensured a diverse selection of meals and 
snacks to choose from. Online menus were 
updated daily so each patron knew what would 
be served ahead of time. All locations on campus 
had a variety of fresh vegetables and fruit, whole 
grains, vegetarian and vegan options. With 
different venues across campus that were open 
from 7 am to 1 1 pm, Clemson University dining 
had food options to fit every need and schedule. 

Clemson dining was also committed to waste 
reduction and energy efficiency. Tray-less dining 



was put in place in Harcombe and Schilleter 
dining halls, along with 100% bio-diesel cooking 
oil. Campus dining is also making an effort 
to integrate food from local farms into meal 
options. A new "Pledge to Erase the Waste" was 
made available at Schilleter, Harcombe, and 
Clemson House dining halls. The Eco-Shell was 
a new sustainable to-go container that allowed 
patrons to erase waste as part of a recycling 
program that would prove cost-efficient, sanitary, 
convenient, and environmentally friendly. 

Another tasty option was '55 Exchange, located 
in Hendrix Student Center, which served the 
famous Clemson ice cream and blue cheese. 







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57 




Campus Finest 



Comething 
^ in these 



hills 



By: Katherine Williams 

Greeks & Organizations Editor 



Whether sitting down to eat a "meat & 
three" at the Esso, studying out on 
Bowman Field, or painting up for another 
football game in Death Valley, it is obvious that 
there is something different about Clemson 
University. Although it is a small college town, 
Clemson still offers a big city feel with specialty 
shops like Raspberry Fizz, M.H. Frank, and the 
newest downtown boutique, Entourage. There are 
limitless places to enjoy a good meal like Mac's 
Diner, TD's, and new to downtown, The Burger 
Joint. Delicious desserts can also be found at all 
the local ice-cream and frozen yogurt shops. Joe 
Sherman had it ri»ht when he wrote, "There is 



don't know what it is about you Clemson people, 
but your undying love for Clemson is admired 
by everyone I know.'" Maybe it is the traditions 
Clemson students have, like getting your Tiger 
Town Tavern t-shirt when you finally turn 21, 
Solid Orange Fridays, ordering your ring the 
second you have acquired 90 hours, or going to 
Spill the Beans at least once every week, that make 
Clemson University such a special place. Or maybe 
it's the fact that year after year the Princeton 
Review has placed Clemson University in the top 
five for the "Happiest Students" category, or the 
fact that Clemson University ranks 25th among 
all public institutions in the nation. Whatever the 



something in these hills that you and I can't define reason, Clemson students take pride in knowing 
and others can't understand. A wave of warmth that they are part of something big here in upstate 

always surges through me when 'outsiders' say, 'I South Carolina. 




Campus Finest 



PEOPLE 




ivmg a 



nd&i/-, 



By: Alec Gibson, Editor-in-Chief 




Clemson University brought back an old tradition, one that 
was extremely popular during the early years of higher 
education. This year three professors will be living in on-campus 
residence halls in order to allow students the opportunity to 
interact with professors outside of the classroom. One of these 
professors is Dr. Chris Grau, who (with his wife Susan Watson) 
lived in Holmes Hall, which houses students in the Calhoun 
Honors College. 

Dr. Grau is an expert in ethics, the philosopy of the mind, and 
the philosophy of film. He was inpired to apply for the Faculty in 
Residence program by his own undergraduate experience at New 
York University, in which his professor lived next door to him. 
"This type of program brings the professor 'down to earth,'" 
Grau said. "Students get to see them and interact with them 



outside the classroom in a way that goes beyond office hours. 
That is something I've always kept in mind and wanted to be a 
part of at other schools where I've worked." 
After four years at Clemson, Grau and his wife Susan felt 
that it was time to move out of their farm house and become 
a part of the campus community. He saw this program as an 
opportunity to introduce students with a wide range of majors 
to the humanities in an environment outside of the classroom. 
In addition to Dr. Grau and his wife Susan, their Jack Russell 
terrier Emma joined them in their Holmes Hall apartment. The 
students living with Grau took an immediate liking to Emma, so 
much so that they began to call her the "pet in residence." This 
name stuck and soon became a common phrase among both 
students and staff members. 




62 H Professor Chris G 




CONSTANT LEARNING 

The students in Holmes Hall are not the only ones 
using the new Faculty in Residence program to 
expand their knowledge, the professors take the 
opportunity to learn a few things as well. 

OLD DOG, NEW TRICKS 

Although Emma has been with Dr. Grau for a while, 
she is having to adapt to her new lite of living on 
campus, a challenge she seems more than willing to 
accept. 





Faculty in Residence, 



This is a great opportunity not only to get to know 
a group ot students, but also to interact with other 
faculty and staff. This will give me the chance to be a 
bigger part of the University. 

- Dr. Chris Grau 



Professor Chris Grau 



63 



STANDING STRONG 

Members of the CGSA, along with other 

members of the Clemson community, 

form a human chain to protest gender 

and sexuality-based violence. 

Photo r>} Alec Gibson 



SUPPORTING HUMAN RIGHTS 

Students show their support for equal 

rights with demonstrations, discussions, 

and even t-shirts. 

Photo by Joshua Kelly 








equality for all. 



"CGSA's mission is to create a safe 
place for everyone. From members of 
the LGBT community to our straight 
alllies, everyone is welcome. We hope 
to foster a sense of equality for all 
individuals, regardless of sexual identity 
or orientation," said Briana Foust. 



- 



Clemson Gay-Straight Alliance 




all about 



A 11 inclusive. That is the best way to describe 
x jLrhe Clemson Gay-Straight Alliance 
according to its president, Briana Foust. As 
long as the CGSA has been a part of Clemson 
University, the organization has provided a save 
space for students oi all genders and sexual 
orientations. This year, the CGSA attempted to 
branch out in an attempt to include more people, 
and they have been more than successful. 
Though biweekly meetings on Tuesday evenings, 
social events every week, and movie nights on 
Sundays that showcase lesbian, gay, bisexual, and 
transgender (LGBT) issues, the CGSA worked to 
not only raise awareness and promote equality, 
but also to bring a variety of different individuals 
together. Members ot the CGSA have also held 
and promoted campus-wide events, some of 
which include forming a human chain to protest 





By: Alec Gibson, Editor-in-Chief 



violence based on gender and sexual orientation 
and putting together events for National Coming 
Out Day. 

The members of the CGSA worked to educate 
Clemson about the LGBT community, the 
problems that come from stereotyping other 
people, and the negative consequences that stem 
from labeling individuals and judging them 
based on who they are. Members even addressed 
President Barker at the Town Hall meeting about 
LGBT issues at Clemson. "We're not just 'them,' 
we're 'us,'" said one member. "We're not just 
gays, lesbians, and queers. We're not labels, we're 
people. ..we're everyone." The CGSA showed all 
people, students, faculty, and staff alike, that an 
environment can be created where everyone is 
considered equal, and where everyone has true 
pride in who they are. 




A HELPING HAND 

The CGSA provides support for the LGBT community during a 
celebration of National Coming Out Day 
Photo by Joshua Kelly 

QUITE A SHOW 

CGSA members put together a costume and drag show as part of their 
National Coming Out Day celebration. 
Photo by Joshua Kelly 



Clemson Gay-Straight Alliance 



Am 



ALL EYES ON THE GAME 

This loyal fan never takes his eyes off 

of the game while the Clemson players 

are on the field. 

Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 

SIDELINE FIXTURE 

As stated hy Dabo, "Hollywood is a fixture 

at the Clemson games." This radiant smile 

is the well-known sideline fixture. 

Photo \rj Anna Lauren Meeks 




Simply inspirational. 



Hollywood has been a constant 
source of cheer and encouragement 
for the football players throughout 
his forty-five years on the sidelines. 
His devotion and commitment to 
Clemson's football team is simply 
inspirational. 



■4 



66 II Hollywood 




'ears on the sidelines 



By: Anna Lauren Meeks, Photography Editor 



Clemson football can be considered a 
pastime, even an obsession; but for 
one man on the field, it has been more than 
either one of those. Lafayette Alexander, more 
popularly known as "Hollywood," has been a 
lively sideline occupant for the past forty-five 
years. Born and raised in Pendleton, South 
Carolina, Hollywood has been around Clemson 
his entire life. According to Hollywood, his love 
for Clemson football began when a tew ot his old 
friends from high school started playing on the 
team in the 1960s. They invited him to come to 
one of the games and from then on, Hollywood 
has been seen on sidelines of the Clemson 
football field on the weekends of home games. 
He has thoroughly enjoyed getting to know 
every single player throughout the years spent 
on the sidelines, and every player, in turn, has 




loved getting to know Hollywood. "Hollywood 
is a fixture at the Clemson University games. I 
always see him as I come out of our tunnel each 
game," states Coach Dabo Swinney. "He is always 
waiting to say hello and loves us no matter what 
happens on the field. He has a warm spirit and 
a smile that brightens the day." In forty-five years, 
the sixty-one year old Hollywood has only missed 
one home game and can tell you about any 
player from any year that you ask him about. He 
is constantly talking to the players as they enter 
and exit the field, as well as yelling commands 
at them from his sideline position. Hollywood 
gladly claims the title as "Clemson's Number 
One Fan," and with such a great commitment to 
our football team, it's hard to argue that position 
for anyone else. 




A TRUE CHEER LEADER 

Hollywood is caught leading the cheerleaders in an informal cheer as the 
Tigers make a touchdown during the game against Boston College. 
Photo b} Anna Lauren Meeks 

WHO IS HE? 

As stated on the handwritten note in his hands, Lafayette Alexander is 
proud to be demon's #1 fan! 
Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 



Hollywood 



*■ 



a 




■etitfatX of tiger 

^^— ** Bv: Katie Simmons. Layout Editor 



At least 726 students flooded Clemson's campus in the 
fall that have a disability of some sort. Typically the word 
'disahilty' provokes images of someone that is physically limited; 
yet, there are disabilities people have which are not seen by 
merely looking at that person. These hidden disabilities made up 
more than half of the disabled student population at Clemson. 

To make the transition to Clemson easier for freshmen, as well 
as to help with accommodation throughout their undergraduate 
and graduate careers, Student Disability Services (SDS) 
provides various avenues for students to have access to the same 
opportunities as any other student. Such accommodations 
include scanning textbooks into a digital format for easier access 
and transport, providing someone to take notes for the student 
in class, and working with an interpreter or captionist. Students 



in collaboration with SDS are also given Faculty Accomodation 
Letters, tailored specifically to each individual, to apply to each 
class for the semester. 

Students who are involved with SDS and maintain a GPA of 3.1 
(3.3 for graduate students) were invited to be inducted into the 
nationally recognized honor society for disabled students, Delta 
Alpha Pi. This is one way for these students to get involved on 
campus and be recognized for their academic achievements. SDS 
also organizes the event Walk and Roll in My Shoes. Students 
with disabilities volunteer to allow other students as well as 
faculty members shadow them for a day after they are 'given' a 
diagnosed disability. The event provokes a great deal of empathy 
towards those with disabilities and brings awareness to how far 
Clemson still has to go to be fully accessible. 





BELIEVING IS SEEING 

Dr. Arlene Stewart enjoys a laugh during one of 
her meetings with a disabled student. "It's not what 
we do in this office that's important or significant, 
but our belief that everyone has something to 
contribute. All I do is make sure our students have 
the vast breadth of opportunities, just like ariy 
other student at Clemson. I honestly feel privileged 
to work with students with disabilities. Their 
accomplishments speak for me," said Stewart. 

SPEAKING THE LANGUAGE 

Public Information Director Angela Nixon watches 
as she is shown how to work the device that would 
allow her to communicate for the rest of the 
day. Nixon was one of the faculty members who 
participated in Walk and Roll and was given a 
severe communications disorder. 



EXTRAORDINARY EDUCATOR 

Dr. Arlene Stewart congratulates Dr. Steve Stevenson, from 
the School of Computing, as he receives the Extraordinary 
Educator Award for his work with students. 



Students with Disabilities 



■*-*-^ 



ezt 




By: Anna Lauren Meeks, 

Photography Editor 

During the 2011-2012 academic year, international students came 
to Clemson University from across the globe for a semester, a 
year, or even to begin an entire college career. Lilla Fordos, an exchange 
student from Keszthely, Hungary, began running at the age of nine and 
quickly won recognition from recruiters here in the United States. "I 
became a successful runner by hard and humble work and with the 
guidance of excellent coaches and teammates." After receiving many 
national champion titles, American universities began offering this 
talented young lady athletic scholarships. One of these universities 
was our very own, Clemson University, which Lilla chose to become 
her home for the next four years. As she recalls, "I just had a feeling 
or a natural instinct to choose Clemson over all of the other schools. 
One year later I was in South Carolina wearing orange and starting as a 
Clemson Tiger, running for Clemson's track team. Now, four years later, 




down south 



■% 



I look back and can definitely tell that I am happy with my decision." In 
her four years, Lilla was able to travel to various conferences for track, 
experience a more determined team spirit than what she was used to 
in Europe, become the president of the German Club, and explore the 
mountainous areas of the Blue Ridge. After her track-ending injury and 
reluctance to have to leave the track team, Lilla moved to Calhoun Courts 
where many other exchange students live, and took the opportunity to 
become friends with international students from all over the world. "It 
helped me to understand a deeper side of other cultures," claims Fordos. 
Lilla's four years have quickly come to an end and she will graduate 
as a Clemson Tiger ifi December of 2011 with a degree in Political 
Science and a minor in German. Though she didn't end her career 
here running, she will walk away with many new perspectives on life 
and experiences she could have only found here at Clemson University. 




FROM AROUND THE WORLD 

Lilla enjoyed living in Calhoun 

Courts where she met many people 

from around the world. 

Photo hi Anna Lauren Mccks 



70 II International Student 




RUNNING FOR THE TEAM 

I discovered a more determined team spirit than 
what I was used to in Europe. It was the first time I 
realized and felt the mentality that I am not running 
for myself, I am running for Clemson," said Fordos. 

SHE BECAME A CLEMSON TIGER 

Lilla is an energetic Clemson fan and enjoys cheering 
at football games with the other exchange students 
she befriended living in Calhoun Courts. 









> ■ 


■^^St 


. iJl 








J ^""^ 


' ' 





the world at your feet. 



I traveled a lot during my years in the United States. I 
visited many cities on the East Coast, and I even got 
a chance to visit one of my friends in Alaska. This was 
probably one of my favorite states. 



» 



Lilla Fordos 



International Student 



L 



'^^^^ m By: Alec Gibson, E< 




Editor-in-Chief 



The life of a graduate student is demanding to say the least. 
Many undergraduates think of graduate students as their 
lab TAs (Teaching Assistants) and nothing more. For Kristine 
Moody, a Ph.D. student studying Evolutionary Biology, the life 
of a graduate student is much more involved than most people 
realize. "No matter how I plan out my day, something always 
pops up that throws me for a loop, but you just have to go with 
it. Otherwise I think a person would go crazy. Needless to say, 
my days are pretty full from beginning to end. Balancing it all is 
challenging but doable," says Kristine. From doing DNA analysis 
in the laboratory to doing field research in Hawaii and serving as 
a Teaching Assistant, Kristine certainly stays busy. She describes 
how it is important for graduate students to maintain a proper 
mindset: "First and foremost, you have to have determination, 
dedication, and a passion for what you are doing. If you don't, 



you will quit. There isn't a recipe book for graduate school, you 
must create your own. Graduate school is messy, aggravating, 
disappointing, exciting, illuminating, and awe-inspiring. It's a 
rollercoaster! If you don't like rollercoasters then don't get on 
the ride. But if you get excited about searching for answers, 
want to inspire and be inspired, and have perseverance, then 
graduate school is for you." Kristine's plan after she obtains 
her Ph.D. is to obtain a faculty position so that she can 
balance teaching and doing research, and she hopes to provide 
others with the experiences and insight that inspired her. "I 
would like to help future scientists on their path to discover. 
My undergraduate and graduate advisors have made all the 
difference in my life both professionally and personally. I would 
not be the person and scientist I am today without them. I want 
to have that type of impact on someone else's life!" 



Counts 
Moo 





IN-DEPTH INVESTIGATING 

"I try to break up my day hy working a 
couple of hours in the lab doing DNA work 
and a couple of hours doing computer 
work like data analysis. I generally have 
undergraduates coming in and out of lab 
that I supervise in conducting DNA work." 



ORGANIZATION IS KEY 

Keeping a laboratory organized and 
running efficiently is not an easy task, but 
Kristine more than rises to the challenge. 
Organizational and leadership skills are 
essential for graduate students. 



Becca Ready 



WHAT A LIFE 

"We always spend at least a few hours in the freezing cold 
mountain fed streams, holding on for dear life so we don't 
get swept over a waterfall, snorkeling for endemic fish. As 
crazy as that sounds, it really is the best part of the day." 



A FUTURE PROFESSOR 

Kristine serves as a Teaching Assistant for BIOSC 335: 
Evolutionary Biology. Between running review sessions, 
writing/grading exams, and giving the occasional lecture, 
Kristine works hard to mentor students. 



Graduate Student 



** 



73 



LEADING THE WAY 

As the captain of the women's rugby 

team, Courtney has learned what it 

means to lead by example. 

Photo courtesy of Courtney Dans 

NOT JUST A STUDENT 

Courtney Davis is not just a full-time 

Clemson student; she is also a proud 

aunt to her niece Rinni. 

Photo courtesy 0} Courtney Davis 






felong friends. 



"My primary involvement on campus 
is with the Clemson women's rugby 
team. I'm fortunate to be captain this 
year and spend any free time I have 
outside of studying and classes doing 
team activities." 



-Courtney Davis 



74 



e — 




the 



t: 




Mie majority of Clemson students spend 
four years working to earn their degree, 
a time that is traditionally divided into 
freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior years. 
However, some students remain at Clemson 
tor an additional year and have come to be 
affectionately known as "super seniors." 
Courtney Davis explains the situation that led 
her to a fifth year at Clemson: "I had to take 
on a titth year due to the fact that I switched 
majors as a junior to Chemistry after initially 
coming in as a Microbiology major. After a year 
as a Chemistry major, I decided that the major 
wasn't tor me, so I switched back to Microbiology 
as a senior." Davis has found that there are 
quite a few perks to being a super senior, as 
well as some drawbacks. "I love Clemson, and 
being a college student has its perks sometimes. 



hew 

By: Alec Gibson, Editor-in-Chief 

I have some extra time to worry about my post- 
graduation plans, play rugby, and hang out with 
friends. The biggest drawback is that continuous 
feeling of senioritis and anxiety that comes from 
postponing graduation for another year," said 
Davis. She goes on to say that her fifth year is 
not that different from her fourth, but there are 
a couple of noticeable differences. "I've been 
more focused in this year than the previous 4, 
but I'm still finding time to have fun and enjoy 
my final year as an undergrad." It seems to be a 
general consensus among super seniors that the 
extra year of work and tuition is well worth the 
satisfaction of earning a degree that is meaningful 
and the memories gained from another fun-filled 
year as a Clemson student. Each super senior has 
a unique reason for their extra year, but they all 
share a key characteristic: happiness. 




OUTSIDE OF CLASS 

Courtney certainly knows how to 
enjoy herself and make use of her 

rime outside of the classroom. 

Photo courtesy of Courtney Davis 



Super Senic 



L 



75 



EP 




campus 



By: Lauren Dailey, junior Staff 



Student Patrol is a student-based division of the Clemson 
University Police Department that is advised hy program 
coordinator James Gowan. This program provides auxiliary non- 
confrontational support for the police department and serves 
the community in several ways through Tiger Transit, housing 
and building security, traffic and crowd control, campus patrol, 
and crime prevention. Since student officers often work during 
the night, the job can become quite taxing. "Books become your 
friend, as long as you don't fall asleep easily! And not falling 
asleep is by far the hardest part of the job, no matter what shift 
you're working," says Abi Stringer, a Student Patrol Officer. At 
the same time, the benefits of the job far outweigh the downside 
of late-night shifts. In addition to a good salary, Student Patrol 
Officers have the opportunity to protect their fellow students 
and interact with the Clemson Police Department. "Working 



here helps you realize that the police officers aren't just guys 
out to get you, they always have your back and are really trying 
to keep you safe. Once you really get to know them you see that 
they are a pretty great group of people, working hard at a job 
helping people," says Stringer. Dayne Porter, another Student 
Patrol Officer, describes one night that he will always remember. 
"I was walking in front of Thornhill apartments when I saw the 
CAT bus pull up. All of the sudden, four guys come sprinting 
out of the woods and run behind the cat bus. Two of them lean 
over and cup their hands. The other two use their hands to 
jump on top of the cat bus! They were on top of the bus so fast 
that the driver didn't even notice. I called it into dispatch and 
an officer came and saw the guys riding on top of the bus. The 
guys then jumped off the top of the bus and ran away. It was 
dangerous and impressive at the same time!" 




76 ■ I Student Patrol Officers 




BETTER SAFE THAN SORRY 

Student Patrol Officers must make sure 
to check the card access systems for all ot 
the campus buildings, especially for the 
residence halls. They must be careful not to 
overlook any of the buildings. 

ON THE JOB 

Student Patrol Officers are often required 
to work throughout the night and early 
morning to ensure the campus remains safe 
and secure at all times. This means students 
must be willing to work difficult hours. 





QUICK RESPONSE 

Incoming calls and radio alerts come through the call 
center and dispatch office. Students who work here must 
quickly respond and re-direct information. 



BEHIND THE SCENES 

Campus security does not only take place in the dorms or 
on campus streets; Student Patrol Officers also work in the 
police station offices to ensure the overall safety of students. 



Student Patrol Officers 



Am 



77 



,' 



O'RE THE MOUNTAIN HEIGHTS 

Student and alumni fans join together at 

the end of a game to sing the Clemson 

alma mater. 




SHOUTS FOR SAMMY TO THE EXTREME 

Excited fans are overjoyed as one of Clemson's star players, One fan loves the Tigers so much that he decided to 

Sammy Watkins, greets them on his way down the Hill at dedicate his hair style to the them for the Wake Forest 

the NC State game. game. 




TtsriasWc facet 



t By: Becca Ready, Academics Editor 



With fists held high, "C-L-E-M-SO-N T-1-G-E-RRRR-S!" is 
the resounding chorus rising from Death Valley on any 
game day at Clemson. Students chant in unison the Cadance 
Count and a wave of raising arms can be seen across the crowd 
as more and more people join in the excitement. 

Undoubtedly, some of the most important people to the 
Clemson experience are the thousands upon thousands of 
screaming, cheering fans that regularly attend football games and 
make the most exciting twenty-five seconds of college football 
come alive. From all walks of life, they surround the stadium- 
students, alumni, families, and Columbia converts alike, dressed 
to the nines and ready to cheer the Tigers to victory. The most 
dedicated student fans are easily spotted on the front rows of the 
student section, enjoying their prized tickets that they obtained 



after seven long nights of sleeping on the ground outside of the 
ticket office to win the best seasts in the house. The dedication 
of others can be seen through their wild dress. Favorite game 
day styles for some include painting up with friends and spelling 
out the name of a favorite player across their chests, while others 
prefer to be covered head to toe in orange and purple in honor 
of their soon-to-be alma mater. 

Anyone who visits a game at Clemson will undoubtedly walk 
away changed because of the sea of orange and purple created 
by the fans that plays a major role in defining the identity of 
Clemson every fall. In very few places can one find so many 
people who share one common passion as at a Clemson football 
game among the fans. 




Prashanth Elangovan 

Ryan Engelke 
Tyler Jacob Karolczyk 

Arpit Patel 
Marlee Elizabeth Hart 



ACADEMICS 




1 





Dear Clemson Students: 

During the celebration last year of the 101st volume of Taps, it was 
noted that Clemson has had the nation's Most Outstanding University 
Yearbook for five years in a row. Congratulations! Taps has gone from 
documenting Clemson's traditions to being one itself. In fact, Taps is one 
of our most important and enduring traditions. Each year, the writers and 
photographers add another volume to the great unfinished story of our 
university. One thing I've learned after a decade as Clemson's President is 
that everybody has a story. 

The story of our founders, Anna Calhoun and Thomas Green 
Clemson, is one of fierce determination. Together, they were determined 
to improve education and economic prosperity in South Carolina. Because 
of their bequests and their legacy, the story of Clemson University is still 
being written. That's why the name of the campaign we announced this 
academic year is "The Will to Lead" and why its theme is "unfinished 
stories." Over the first decade of this century, Clemson has transformed 
itself from a respected regional institution to one of the nation's finest 
public universities. 

The coming decade will determine our future as a more independently 
funded public university with a determination, as always, to remain a 
student-centered research university. As an alumnus, it is a special honor to 
lead the university I love as its president, and to represent our faculty, staff 
and students to the world beyond our campus. I believe that each of you has 
the potential for greatness, and it is our job to help you achieve all that you 
can in life. How will you write the next chapter of your Clemson story? We 
can't wait to read it. 

Go Tigers! 

Jim Barker 



a 



Letter from the President 



TRULY AN HONOR 

President and Mrs. Barker sing 

the National Anthem at the ACC 

Championship football game. 

Photo by Joshua Kelly 





the chief 

As Mr. Barker enters his 13th year as 
president of Clemson University, his 
tremendous involvement is evident everywhere 
on campus. We've all read about his Top 20 
Initiative, we've seen him at the many events he 
participates in, and we've read in brochures about 
how throughout his time at Clemson he has been 
a student, dean, and now president. However, 
few students realize how rare our President truly 
is. Of the twelve schools in the ACC, President 
Barker is only one of four presidents that actually 
attended the school they preside over. His strong 
ties and passion for the University have been his 
inspiration for many of the changes he is making 
on campus. 



By: Jodi Williams 

Junior Staff 

$3 million federal grant that will allow the 
University to monitor the water resources in the 
Upstate and a $45 million grant from the U.S. 
Department of Energy to build wind turbines 
off of the coast of North Charleston. In addition 
to these announcements, President Barker 
has released his new 2020 plan, including the 
Will to Lead campaign to raise $600 million in 
private gifts by June 2012. Despite all of these 
commitments, however, he still has time for his 
students. For example, President Barker has 
participated in the Welcome Back luncheon for 
incoming freshmen, held an annual Open House, 
and allowed students to come trick-or-treating at 
his house on Halloween. His passion for Tiger 
students and his determined spirit make him a 
well-respected icon of Clemson University. 




A TIGER AT HEART 

President Barker proudly shows off his Clemson 
spirit with his wife at Tigerama. 
Photo by Joshua Kelly 



President Barker 



L 



87 



THE REVIEWS ARE IN 

Students joined in active discussion 

groups in which their summer reading 

projects were talked about. Thoughts 

and opinions were shared on what they 

thought about the assigned book. 

Photo Jrv Cody Whitelock 




Summer Reading and Convocation 




igers ^_ 
at the river 



By: Katie Simmons, 

Layout Editor 



E; 



ach year, freshmen flood the sidewalks at 
'Clemson, searching for their place among the 
other students at the University. Many programs 
are offered to ease this process, and attendance 
is mandatory. Of these, the summer reading 
program and freshman convocation are likely two 
of the most important. Freshmen were required 
to read Rim Rash's novel Saints at the River, a copy 
of which they each received at orientation. 

Rash was invited to speak with the students 
concerning the hook, explaining the thought 
process that went into writing it as well as 
answering any questions the new Tigers may have 
had. The freshmen then broke up into smaller 
groups in order to talk about the book in more 
detail and to share their own opinions and 




insights. These group discussions were held in 
various places across campus. 

Coming together once more, the freshmen 
participated in a special tradition - Convocation. 
This special event allowed the new Tigers to 
gather as a class and receive inspiration and words 
of wisdom from President Barker as well as others, 
including Provost Helms. As the event began 
drawing to a close, each student of the Class of 
2015 was bestowed with their own Clemson pin. 
These pins were unique to their year and tied 
them together as a class. It commemorated even 
more the importance of Clemson as a family and 
what it means to be a Tiger, which is something 
that will add to their own memories as well as 
ink them together long after graduation. 




FACULTY ENCOURAGEMENT 

Provost Helms had several pieces of valuable advice 
to share with the new students. 
Photo fry Cody Whitelock 



Summer Reading and Convocation 



L 



8'= 



71 



a king 
it easy 



As you can probably imagine, leisure skills 
courses fill up very quickly here at Clemson. 
The leisure skills curriculum dates back to 1972, 
and began as a response to a lack of physical 
education at Clemson. Now students enjoy taking 
these one to two hour classes for fun or just some 
extra exercise during the day. Courses range from 
riflery and scuba diving to pilates and yoga, or 
even fly fishing, billiards or shag! With so much 
variety, there is sure to be a course that interests 
every student, no matter what his or her passion 
might be. Courses are tailored for both men and 
women and do not leave anyone out as long as 
there is an open spot to be filled. 

A majority of the classes take place at the 
Clemson' s recreation center, Fike. Students swipe 



By: Kelsey Lundstrom 
Junior Staff 



their CUID on their way in and they are set to 
go. Teachers are generally pretty lenient as far as 
course work goes for leisure skills classes. There is 
usually little to no homework and if so, it is usually 
pretty enjoyable compared to homework for classes 
like calculus. 

No matter which course you get involved in, each 
provides a great way to bond with your peers 
outside of a standard classroom. Since freshmen 
are stuck picking their classes last, they are unlikely 
to have the "leisure" of getting into any of these 
fun classes right away. However, as one makes his 
or her way up the collegiate ladder, classes become 
more available to you. Each semester, there are 
typically over 2,500 undergraduate students 
enrolled in these courses. 



90 



Jl 



Leisure Skills 






k^vl. 11 




Ip3*~ 3 , 


™]m*' • 


■3) 


Andre Friedman 



Leisure Skills I I 



im 



LOTS OF NOTES 

Organic Chemistry is notoriously 

one of the hardest classes at Clemson 

University. Good note-taking skills are 

essential for a good exam score. 

Photo by Morgan Robinson 




A LITTLE HELP 

Students often find that dry-erase 

hoards help them understand difficult 

concepts and aid in studying. 

Photo by Morgan Robinson 

A QUIET SPACE 

Cooper Library provides ample study 

areas in which students can have their 

own private and quiet nook. 

Photo by Becca Ready 







Examinations 







na _ 
Exams 




Finals. This six-letter word puts everyone 
in a stressful mood. Clemson University, 
however, was able to put on events in order for 
students to eat their sorrows away. This year, as 
with years in the past, Schiletter put on a pancake 
dinner at midnight, allowing students to get a 
break trom the long hours of studying in dorm 
rooms, Cooper, and apartments. Cooper library 
also hosted a cookies and coffee study break to 
help take an edge oft the stress. Besides Cooper 
library, other popular places to study for finals 
included Moe Joes, Starbucks, and a cute little 
coffee shop in Central. Java City was a popular 
hang out and break place during the week. With 
Java City's extended hours, students were able 
to get a warm cup of coffee to help them pull off 
that much-needed all-nighter. CLEMSONLiVE 



By: Katie Guest 

Junior Staff 

helped relieve stress for students by hosting "study 
buddy" teddy bear making. Students were able 
to stuff and create their own teddy bears, which 
helped students unwind from the morning exams. 
Although exam week is always a much dreaded 
time for Clemson students, this year Clemson 
University was able to help students relax while 
studying. Clemson senior Jordan Hollis said it 
best "Finals are a stressful time for everyone, 
but the activities Clemson University planned 
made the week a lot more bearable. Also, visiting 
Java City for their holiday specials never hurt." 
Whether you enjoyed flipping through pages in 
a small coffee shop, or pulling an all-nighter with 
friends, the best feeling was finishing that last 
final and celebrating putting the first semester's 
work behind you. 





LOTS OF STRESS 

During final exams students can often he found 
pulling "all nighters" in the work areas of the 
Hendrix Student Center. 
Photo by Fctima Hakimji 



Examinations 



L 



93 



m ^-\ 



/^areer 
^ services 



Whether you're looking for a summer 
internship, a post-graduation job, or just 
interview practice, the Michelin Career Center 
otter several services and programs for Clemson 
students and recent graduates. Located on the 
third floor of the Hendrix Student Center and 
open Monday through Friday, 8am - 4:30pm, 
the career center offers a number oi resources. 
Some of the services they offer include: career 
and major counseling, resume and cover letter 
critiques, mock interviews, full-time employment 
and internship assistance and information, 
and graduate school information.The Career 
Center hosts a career fair in both the fall and 
spring semesters. Companies from all over the 



By: Katherine Williams, 
Greeks & Organizations Editor 

U.S. come to recruit some of Clemson's finest 
students for internships, co-ops, and full-time 
employment. The Career Center runs Clemson's 
JobLink website where students and recent 
graduates can search online for internship, part- 
time, and full-time employment. They also offer 
several workshops throughout the school year 
to help prepare students to find employment. 
Whether you are a freshman looking to get 
involved in a student organization, a sophomore 
hoping to learn more about occupations that 
interest you, a junior looking to secure a summer 
internship, or a senior beginning the job search, 
the Michelin Career Center is a great resource. 




Career Center 




MEET AND GREET 

Making a good first impression is 

a must when speaking to possible 

employers, so students dress their best. 

Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 



Career Center I | 95 



u 




ive o'clock 
world 



By: Katie Simmons, 

Layout Editor 



A great way for students to gain work 
experience while in college, as well as 
network with potential business contacts, is 
either through the Cooperative Education 
Program (Co-op) or an internship. Both provide 
great opportunities for application of knowledge 
from the classroom to real situations. 

Students who chose the option to Co-op were 
placed with a company for up to three rotations, 
depending on their major. These companies are 
typically stationed in the Southeast, but students 
have also been sent overseas, which constitutes 
an added bonus of cultural enhancement. Junior 
Electrical Engineering major Emily Collins 



states, "As I've progressed in my rotations, 
I've been trusted with more challenging work, 
keeping me interested and making me feel like 
I'm working on more important tasks." Emily 
has completed all three rotations in Charleston. 

If spending time away from their studies was not 
ideal, then completing an internship was the 
best way for students to gain work experience in 
their chosen field. Unlike Co-ops that are paid, 
internships could be either paid or unpaid, and 
they provide the flexibility of working various 
amounts, including solely during the summer. 
Yet, both still provide great experiences and 
resume boosters! 





Co-ops and Internships 



p 



laces 
to ao 



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rom chocolate tasting in Belgium, 



to scuba diving on the Great 
Barrier Reef, to learning to speak 
Japanese in the country it originated, 
Clemson's study abroad programs 
offer choices of every variety. Clemson 
offers faculty-led programs, exchange 
programs, and aid in finding a third- 
party provider to help students choose 
the program that is just right for 
them. For students pursuing modern 
languages with a particular emphasis 
on a certain culture, studying abroad is 
the perfect next step on the journey to 
fluency. Hannah Barton, a senior who 
experienced a study abroad program 
in Cordoba, Argentina for a minor in 



By: Becca Ready 

Academics Editor 

Spanish said, "It's immersion in the 
language and my vow to speak only 
Spanish that gave me an experience 
like being in a classroom 24/7 but ten 
times more exciting!" Some students 
study abroad to observe how other 
countries compare with our own. 
Architecture students are required - 
to travel in order to observe various 
styles of structure, and political science 
students study abroad to see how other 
governments are run. No matter where 
a student travels though, there is no 
doubt that a study abroad experience 
can make all the difference for them, 
both in college and in life. 



•>r> 



R»« 




A WHOLE NEW WORLD 

Anna Lauren sits on the edge of a 1,500 year old castle in 
Alicante, Spain overlooking her new home. 
Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 



HISTORY IN THE MAKING 

Katie Simmons and friends marvel at the historic 
Stonehenge of Whiltshire, England. 
Photo by Katie Simmons 



mk 



~<^.- 



itudy Abroad 




A SIGHT TO SEE 

Many students decided to go on 
a faculty-led program to Paris and 
Normandy entitled "Revisting 
D-Day." On Mont St. Michael's 
coast in Normandy, they gather 
around to take a group picture 
with the Tiger Rag, one of 
Clemson's traditions. "Revisting 
Historical Sites of Normandy 
and Paris was an amazing 
opporuntuity that I will never 
forget," said Cody Whitelock. 
Photo by Cody Whitelock 



WEEKEND TRIPS 

Many students get to travel to 
ditterent locations while living 
abroad. Sara Smotherman takes 
a weekend trip from her home in 
Barcelona to visit Port Lligat and 
Costa Brava, Spain. 
Photo courtesy of Sara Smotherman 

A RAINY SEMESTER 

Raincoats became a part ot 

Lauren Mosshart's daily attire 

for her semester in Aberdeen, 

Scotland. 

Photo courtesy of Lauren Mosshart 




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College of Agriculture Forestry, and Life Sciences 




ife to the 
fullest 



By: Lauren Beretich 

junior Staff 



The College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life 
Sciences is one of five colleges at Clemson 
University. CAFLS mission is "to provide teaching, 
research and service in agriculture, forestry, 
and life sciences that will benefit the citizens 
of South Carolina and the nation." In 2011, 
CAFLS offered 17 undergraduate programs, 14 
masters programs, and 10 doctorate programs, 
including Agricultural Mechanization ck Business, 
Biochemistry, Biological Sciences, Genetics, 
Packaging Science, and Wildlife & Fisheries 
Biology. With over 2,700 students, CAFLS made 
quite an impact in 201 1. At the CAFLS Town 
Hall Meeting in November, students praised 
their chosen majors and voiced their concerns 
regarding reorganization of the college. The 2011 
plan involved reorganizing the 16 departments 



of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life 
Sciences into only 10 departments. Changes 
not only occurred in the department structure 
of CAFLS, but on Clemson's campus as well. 
Construction continued on the new Life Sciences 
building. When completed, the facility will house 
teaching laboratories as well as faculty offices. 
Research was also an integral part of the College 
of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life Sciences in 2011. 
CAFLS faculty were involved in projects with titles 
such as "Genomic and Breeding Foundations for 
Bioenergy Sorghum Hybrids" and "Enhancing 
Productivity of American Oystercatchers." All in 
all, the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Life 
Sciences was a college diverse in programs, faculty, 
and research goals. But, CAFLS is united by their 
mission, vision, and Clemson pride. 







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HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE 

CAAH courses give architecture student! 

hands-on experience planning and designing 

Photo by Becca Read-' 



- 



102 1| College of Architecture Arts, and Humanities 



/^"^ollective 
v- ^ creativity 



By: Amber Day, 
Copy Editor 



Clemson's College of Architecture, Arts, 
and Humanities educates students in a 
variety of disciplines, each of which challenge 
them to think critically about the world in which 
they live. Within the college, students pursue 
undergraduate and graduate degrees in majors 
such as visual and performing arts, English, 
philosophy, religion, architecture, and foreign 
languages. The college also has two doctoral 
programs, one in planning, design and the 
built environment, and the other in rhetorics, 
communication, and information design. CAAH 
houses such facilities as the Brooks Center for 
the Performing Arts, the Center for Electronic 
and Digital Publishing (CEDP), and two overseas 



centers in Genoa, Italy and Barcelona, Spain. 
This year the Pearce Center for Professional 
Communication, located on the first floor of 
Daniel Hall in the Class of 1941 Studio, has 
been under new direction from Dr. Michael 
LeMahieu. The Pearce Center has developed a 
partnership with Clemson's ePortfolio program, 
offering students the opportunity to receive 
assistance with their ePortfolios in the Class of 
1941 Studio. Clemson's College of Architecture, 
Arts, and Humanities encourages its students to 
pursue their dreams and attempts to aid them in 
their effort to attain their dreams and reach their 
goals, both academically and creatively. 




rr- 




lobal 
leaders 



By: Morgan Robinson 
Junior Staff 



The College of Business and Behavioral 
Science (CBBS) includes majors in 
accounting, economics, graphic communications, 
management, marketing, political science, 
psychology, sociology and anthropology. CBBS 
has many unique programs to develop the 
leadership skills of its students for the professiona 
world after graduation. It is also the only college 
within Clemson University that has a Tiger Ties 
Mentorship Program. The program was designed 
to match up students with alumni already in their 
field of study. The idea is for the students to learn 
from the alumni who have already gone through 
the process themselves. The Business Experience 
and the Behavioral Science Experience of the 
Living Learning Communities allow students 
with similar interests to live together on the 



same floor of their residence halls. Students 
in these communities have peer advisors and 
Academic Success Center advisors that come 
to the dorm to assist them. CBBS is also home 
to a program called Horizons Professional 
Development that helps students prepare for their 
future careers through-workshops dealing with 
building a resume, conducting oneself properly 
in interviews and etiquette dinners, managing 
money, networking and much more. The College 
oi Business and Behavioral Science is constantly 
making new programs to better prepare students 
for what is to come after graduation. The products 
of this college are intelligent, responsible, and 
quick-thinking professionals who are leaders all 
around the globe. 



A 




'04 ■ | College of Business and Behavioral Sciences 




THEORY AND APPLICATION 
Studetnts in CBBS not only learn theory and 
abstract information, but they also learn to 
apply that knowledge to their everyday lives. 
Photo by Anna Lauren Mecks 




J6$ DeparUHMUkot Management 


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College of Business and Behavioral Sciences 



THE FULL JOURNEY 

Clemson University students have 

access to a wide variety of equipment 

and many different facilities to fulfill 

all of their engineering needs. Students 

can follow their project all the way from 

parts manufacturing to assembly. 

Photo by Becca Ready 




College of Engineering and Science 




ngineenng 
ingenuity 



By: Devin Gibson, 
Junior Staff 



The College of Engineering and Science, 
established in 1995, is one of the main 
features of Clemson University that draws 
students in from all over the country every year. 
The college offers many different majors from 
which students can choose. The undergraduate 
engineering fields offered at Clemson are 
Bioengineering, Biosystems, Chemical, Civil, 
Computer, Electrical, Environmental, Industrial, 
Materials Science, and Mechanical Engineering. 
The undergraduate science majors offered are 
Chemistry, Computer Information Systems, 
Computer Science, Geological Sciences, 
Mathematical Sciences, Physics, and Astronomy. 
One of the requirements that all freshmen 
engineering majors must fulfill involves taking 
two department tours. These tours are specifically 




tailored to each of the different engineering 
fields and take place at different locations 
around campus. By experiencing these tours, 
students have the opportunity to be exposed to 
the area or areas of engineering that they feel 
most interest them. While on these tours, the 
students hear from several guest speakers and 
have the opportunity to ask questions or bring 
up any concerns they might have. Visual aids 
and examples are used throughout the tours 
in order to give students a good idea of some 
of the specific physical applications of their 
particular field. After being exposed to different 
areas of engineering and getting to see some of 
the facilities, freshmen engineering majors are 
better prepared to narrow their choices down to a 
specific area of expertise. 




WIRED MINDS 

Students take full advantage of 
the engineering department's 
extensive technological resources 
Pfmio r»\ Beci.a Rciuh 



IT'S JUST A TEST 

The facilities of Clemson University allow students 
to perform detailed tests for their experiments and 
projects. 



College of Engineering and Science 



L 



107 




n apple 
a day 

The College of Health, Education, and 
Human Development is focused on using 
research and innovation as a driving force in 
the curriculum. The newest academic college 
at Clemson University, CHEHD houses 
eleven majors including everything from Parks, 
Recreation, and Tourism Management to Health 
Sciences. This college links teaching, public 
service, and research to create a challenging and 
first-rate education. State-of-the art laboratories 
and advanced technology allow researchers and 
professionals to create new ideas for the future. 
Public health professionals are the educators for 
others on how to lead happier, healthier lives. 
This college currently has 2,100 undergraduates 



By: Olivia Elswick, 
]unior Staff 

and over 1,000 graduate students. The Eugene 
T Moore School of Education prepares students 
for certification as administrators and teachers. 
Clemson's nursing program is among the best 
in the nation with a nursing licensure pass 
rate of 93.3 percent, which is higher than state 
and national averages. Additionally, Clemson 
is ranked 2nd in the nation for its applied 
economics graduate program. Clemson's Roy 
Jones was named one of the "Most Creative 
Teachers in the South." Health care and public 
service are two of the most popular career fields 
in the United States and the strong curriculum 
pushes students to excel in these fields after 
graduation. 




108 || College of Heolth, Education, and Human Development 



■^1 



Pmart 
c3 at heart 



By: Becca Ready 

Academics Editor 



The Calhoun Honors College has a time- 
honored tradition of tunneling hard- 
working students through their college years by 
providing noteworthy experiences both inside and 
outside the classroom. The program has unique 
opportunities that allow students to grow not 
only as students, but also as people. This year, the 
newest academic addition to the collection was a 
class that allowed students to explore Clemson's 
experimental forest in order to fulfill a general 
education requirement. The Honors program 
also gives students the chance to participate in 
discussion groups through the addition of the 
Dixon Fellows program, in which 8-12 students 
are paired with faculty mentors that encourage 
pursuit of knowledge outside of the classroom. 
In addition, with an Honors living and learning 



community in Holmes Hall, students get to know 
each other by simply living life together. Though 
Honors students are known for their inquisitive 
spirits, they enjoy a healthy amount of leisure time 
outside of academics as well. Over the past two 
football seasons, a group of Honors students and 
accompanying friends lias held firm as one of the 
first ten groups in line for tickets, winning them 
the first and second rows of the student section 
for nearly every home game. The Honors program 
would not be the same without the unique genius 
of its students or the well-equipped staff members 
that guide them, encourage curiosity, and help 
them push limits. Curious minds drive questions 
and questions drive change. Clemson does its best 
to equip its most apt minds to follow suit so that 
there might be a better tomorrow for us all. 




110 ^WI^B Calhoun Honors Col 



ege 




TRUE INNOVATORS 

Graduate studetns often push 

boundaries and help to develop 

groundbreaking technologies. 

Photo by Becca Ready 





By: Lauren Beretich 

Junior Staff 



rowing 

the grad school 



Clemson University's Graduate Program grew 
in the 2011-2012 academic year, not only in 
size hut also in notoriety on Clemson's campus. 
Although the graduate school only accounted 
for 3,000 out of the almost 20,000 Clemson 
students, their impact was hardly unnoticed. From 
the 102 graduate programs offered, these students 
studied topics ranging from Architecture to Youth 
Development Leadership. Graduate student 
involvement was just as diverse as the programs 
they were enrolled in. Clemson University's 
Graduate Student Government is the official 
representation of the graduate student body. 
This active organization aided graduate students 
in may ways, including professional enrichment 
and graduate student orientation. On Clemson's 
campus, there are over 40 graduate student 



organizations such as Chi Sigma Alpha, Genetics 
and Biochemistry Graduate Student Association, 
and Optical Society of America. Graduate students 
also played a large role on campus through 
graduate assistantships. Graduate assistants, more 
commonly known as teaching assistants or TAs, 
interact on a regular basis with undergraduates. 
On and off campus, graduate students were 
accomplishing great things. In 2011, Dena Kniess 
was elected Treasurer of the South Carolina 
College Personnel Association. Furthermore, 
Lauren Layton was awarded the highly competitive 
PEGAS grant from Clemson University Graduate 
Student Government. Due to the hard work and 
spirited involvement of its students, Clemson 
University's Graduate Program grew in recognition 
this past year. 




A HELPING HAND 

A majority of graduate students are also 

employed as Teaching Assistants, which 

gives them opportunities to interact 

with students. 

Photo by Becca Ready 



Graduate School 



L 



113 



^ 



p 



ioneers!_ 
o pioneers! 



By: Alec Gibson 
Editor-in-Chief 



Research is a vital component of 
Clemson University, one that 
not only enriches the experiences of 
students and faculty members but also 
benefits society as a whole. Clemson 
is renowned for its researchers (both 
faculty and students alike) and the 
advances they make in their respective 
fields. The 2011-2012 academic 
year was especially great in terms of 
scientific acheivements. Two Clemson 
physicists, Amanpreet Kaur and 
Dr. Dieter Hartmann, worked in 
conjunction with scientists from across 
Europe to discover a black hole in the 
center of the Andromeda galaxy. Dr. 
James Morris, an Associate Professor 



in the Department of Genetics 
and Biochemistry, was awarded 
a 3-year $360,079 grant from the 
National Institutes of Health to study 
Trypanosoma brucei, a parasite that 
causes African sleeping sickness. In 
the Department of Biological Sciences, 
Dr. Yuqing Dong and Dr. Min Cao' 
were recently awarded a grant from 
the Yamada Research Fund of Japan 
to study the anti-aging effects of royal 
jelly consumption. Jon Desjardins, a 
bioengineer, amassed broken artificial 
joints to learn why they failed and how 
to build better ones. Needless to say, 
Clemson is maintaining its reputation 
as a primier research institution. 



c , 






i i 







Research 



NUTRITION IS KEY 

Evelyn Patrick carefully measures 
the samples to ensure that her 
study of nutrients in animal food 
is accurate. 
Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 




WHAT DO WE EAT? 

Researchers Nancy Allgood 
and Laura Williams use gas 

hromatography to study the 
chemical composition of our 
food. 
Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 

UNDER THE HOOD 

Working with chemicals under 

the fume hood is essential for 

Alec Gibson, who is researching 

the mechanisms by which arsenic 

causes developmental and cellular 

toxicity. 

Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 



■*TO 




p. 



orever 



a tiger 



By: Carson Kohler 
Junior Staff 



With the end of each fall, spring, and 
summer semester, a portion of the 
Clemson University student body walks across the 
Littlejohn Coliseum stage as the larger Clemson 
family looks on at the event. Adorned in an 
orange and purple tassel, the short walk across 
the stage to shake the hand of President Barker 
represents each student's time of hard work at 
the University and their debut into the "real 
world." Whether graduates choose to further their 
education or begin their careers, this is a milestone 
in their life, and one enormous stepping stone in 
building each successful future that lies ahead. 

To impart on the world with a Clemson diploma 
represents years of tradition, spirit, determination, 
and pride. Orange commonly remains a part 



of each graduate's wardrobe, Clemson alumni 
bumper stickers are proudly placed on the back of 
cars, and special trips to tailgate with old friends 
and watch the Tigers play in Death Valley are 
certainly already in the process of being planned. 
Clemson remains in the heart of each graduate 
even after their departure. 

Reflecting upon the exceptional education and 
the positive experience under his or her belt, 
each Tiger walks with a giddy step to receive their 
diploma. As the new alumni face their futures 
ahead, they will hopefully always and forever have 
orange running through their veins. 

Congratulations to the Clemson graduates of 
2011-2012! 




Graduation I 



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•*% 





SWIMMING WITH EASE 

A male swimmer competes 

in a meet doing the 

breaststroke. 

Photo by Morgan Robinson 

READY TO GO 

The competition is stiff for 

these tigers about to swim in 

their race. 

Photo by Morgan Robinson 




By: Kelsey Lundstrom 

Athletics Editor 



The men's and women's swimming and 
diving teams swam through many battles 
during this past season. Due to budget cuts, the 
University made a tough decision and had to 
cut all future teams except for women's diving. 
However, on a more positive note, both teams 
still had a successful season and were able 
to enjoy their newly renovated pools at Fike 
for practice and home meets. A pair of male 
athletes, Eric Bruck and Chris Dart, also snagged 
individual conference championships at the 2012 
ACC Championship. 

Both academically and athletically, the women's 
swimming and diving team also excelled. The 
team was named a College Swimming Coaches 
Association of America Scholar All America 



Team. The honor is presented to college 
swimming and diving teams who have achieved 
a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or 
higher. Our lady tigers held a 3.55 team grade 
point average which boosted them to third in 
the country for the semester. It is clear that the 
women's team has talent both in and out of the 
water. Head coach Christopher Ip commented 
on their success saying "No matter what has 
happened to the program, they have stayed true 
to our team and athletic department's mission." 
Regardless of the University budget cuts, both 
teams have been able to channel their energy and 
finish strong with a sport they truly love. The 
teams were able to show the school what they 
were really made of when it came down to it. 






120 



^ 



Swimming and Diving 




CCOur Tigers fought 
their hearts out 
forClemson 

- Christopher Ip 



1-2-3-4 C-L-E-M-S-O-N 
After his signature belly flop into 
the pool, the swimmers joined 
the coach for the Cadence Count 
Photo bj Morgan Robinson 



&u 



Swimming and Diving 



121 



JThock the world 



The 2011 football season was particularly 
exciting for Tiger fans all over the 
nation. There were four home football 
games in the month of September alone. 
This undefeated month set the momentum 
for the remainder of the season and the 
Tigers were undefeated at home. This year's 
quarterback, Tajh Boyd, led the team to 
countless victories with each touchdown 
pass, and Sammy Watkins, Clemson's wide 
receiver, was a name to remember and 
a number to watch. As a true freshman, 
Watkins has really shone on and off the 
field, making incredible offensive plays. 

When the Tigers beat Wake Forest at home 



By: Kelsey Lundstrom 
junior Staff 



on November 12th, they cinched the ACC 
Atlantic title. This was a nail biter of a 
game and the Tigers earned a win with 
a mere field goal. The Tigers remained 
undefeated at home with a 7-0 record in 
Death Valley and they went on to play in the 
ACC Championship in Charlotte, NC on 
Saturday, December 3rd. The team defeated 
Virginia Tech 38-10, becoming the 2011 
ACC Champions. This win earned them a 
place in the Discover Orange Bowl in Miami, 
FL where they took on West Virginia. 
Clemson's unbelievable season has been 
called the "Shock the World Tour," and the 
team continued to pleasantly surprise Tiger 
fans everywhere with each win. 





TOUCHDOWN PASS 
Quarterback Tajh Boyd releases 
a throw to an open player on the 
Tiger offense. 

TIGER OFFENSE 

Dwayne Allen successfully catches 

a ball during a play in Death 

Valley. 

WIDE RECEIVER 
Depsite the defense, DeAndre 
Hopkins makes the play. 




SCOREBOARD 


■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 


US 


THEM 


Troy 43 


19 


Wofford 35 


27 


Auburn 38 


24 


Florida State 35 


30 


Virginia Tech 23 


3 


Boston College 36 


14 


Maryland 56 


45 


N. Carolina 59 


38 


Georgia Tech 31 


17 


Wake Forest 31 


28 


NC State 13 


37 


USC 13 


34 



"****n* 



CAN'T TOUCH THIS 

Sammy Watkins pushes a 

defender away after he catches a 

hall during the UNC game. 

Photo by Andre Friedman 




«%* •' Kris 




"YOU'RE OUTTA THERE" 

Richie Shaffer puts the tag on the 
runner sliding into third base. 

PERFECT FORM 

As the righty Kevin Brady is 

pitching, he must remember to use 

proper mechanics to achieve the 

most effective movement on the ball. 





^ We're a team with a lot of heart 
and the potential to do great 
things out on the field. ..I couldn't 
be more proud of this group of 
guys. J) 

- Jack Leggett 



AM 



< '*» 



clones step up to the 




late 



Major renovations to Doug Kingsmore 
Stadium (DKS) were initiated with a 
$1 million donation in 2008 from past Tiger 
baseball great, Thomas F. Chapman. The 
grandstands that were funded by this donation 
were dedicated during the 2011 season and 
provided 1000 additional seats to the stadium. 
When Chapman made the donation, one of 
his main objectives was to ensure that half of 
the new seats be reserved as a student section in 
order to encourage more campus involvement. 

The donation from Chapman ignited the 
spirits of member* of Clemson baseball's 
Capital Campaign Committee to begin looking 
toward the tutu re of the program to evaluate 
what other improvements could be made. The 



By: Allison Kennamer 
Student Life Editor 

committee is made up of former Clemson 
baseball players, IPTAY representatives, and 
members of the board of trustees. It is their 
goal to provide fans with a more unique and 
full experience at DKS and to give players, both 
past and present, facilities that will remain 
competitive with other schools in the ACC 
and in the nation. Bob Mahony, former Tiger 
baseball player and member of the Capital 
Campaign committee, said that "it is the main 
focus to encourage past players to give back to 
the program." It is this group of guys who really 
understand how special the baseball program is 
and have the ability to make a huge impact on 
where it is headed as Tiger baseball moves into 
the future. 




ROUTINE PLAY 

Jason Stolz cleanly fields a ground 
ball at short-stop and throws over 
to first for the out. 
Photo by Andre Freidman 



Baseball 



125 





mg 
acK 



By: Samantha Defino 

Junior Staff 




DOWN THE COURT 

Andre Young dribbles the ball 
down the court in an attempt 
to score tor the Tigers. 
Photo by Anna Lauren Mccks 



SCOREBOARD 



US THEM 

Gardner-Webb 65 44 

The Citadel 73 50 

C. ofC 69 72 

C. Carolina 59 60 

Furman 59 49 

Iowa 71 55 

South Carolina 55 58 

Arizonia 47 63 

Winthrop 60 40 

Alabama State 70 45 



Clemson fans were energized with a kickoff 
to another exciting men's basketball 
season at Rock the John on October 21st. The 
Tigers opened their season against Gardner- 
Webb with a win of 65-44 atter having lost their 
13-point lead at the half. This game set the tone 
and theme for the rest of the team's season: 
overcoming adversity. This roller coaster season 
left the team experiencing several highs and 
lows due to both offensive and defensive errors. 
Despite some disappointments along the way, 
the team learned valuable lessons and proved 
that they are capable and not afraid to meet 
challenges head on. 

On January 31, the Tigers met the ranked 



Virginia Cavaliers for an exciting ACC match- 
up. The Cavaliers came out strong at first, but 
the Tigers fought to cut the deficit. After a long, 
hard fought scoring battle, the Cavaliers came 
out on top. Clemson got sweet revenge against 
UVA two weeks later on February 14. The hard 
work and persistence acquired from lessons 
learned all season long paid off, and the Tigers 
earned a well-deserved win against the ranked 
Cavaliers. 

The Tigers continued to rise up and meet 
challenges and were determined to end the 
season on a high note and give a strong show 
in the ACC tournament. 




126 



Men's Basketball 





GOING FOR IT 
Catalin Baciu prepares to shoot a 
3-pointer while fans sit on the edge of 
their seats. 

AVOIDING THE BLOCK 

Bryan Narcisse keeps Maryland from 
blocking his shot in this crucial, game- 
changing moment. 




EAMWORK SKILLS 

lie Tigers are known for their 
effective teamwork and efficient 
ise ot time. 
Photo bj Anna Lauren Merles 



^They're a great 
spurt team. 
Especially when 
they play [at 
Littlejohn], they 
can get on a 
10-point run. 
And often that 
seems to be the 
difference. 5> 
- Brad Brownell 



Men's Basketball 



127 



w% 



Notiyst a boys' 



me 



The Lady Tigers' basketball season began strong with three 
wins in a row followed by several more throughout the year. 
The women travelled all over during the season from Florida to 
Rhode Island to as far as Michigan to represent Clemson with 
pride. Without a doubt, the most exciting game of the season 
was not at Littlejohn Coliseum, but in Blacksburg at Virginia 
Tech. The team fought hard and came out on top with a four- 
point lead in overtime. The game was both televised and a 
conference game, making the win even more triumphant for the 
team and exciting for Clemson overall. 

With only three seniors, two sophomores, and six freshmen, the 
young team showed enormous promise for upcoming seasons. 
Freshman Nikki Dixon has already shown her skill by scoring 
the highest amount of points in almost half of the games. 



128 



Ji 




By: Lauren Dailey, 
junior Staff 



Sophomore Quinyotta Pettaway was not far behind though, with 
the highest amount of points and rebounds in several games. 
The Lady Tigers show a strong bond on and oft the court, whii 
is c\ ident in their passionate game play^^^ 

Head Coach Itoro Coleman was back for her second season 
here at Clemson University with the same positive attitude 
she brought to the team and overall program last year. Coach 
Coleman has made an impact not only on the Lady Tigers' 
basketball team, but also on the student body. She has been 
successful in publicizing the season's games and encouraging 
students to come support the team. Clemson Athletics even 
created a bobblehead doll representing Coach Coleman that 
was given away to 1,000 lucky fans at the Georgia Tech game on 
January 29th. 



TAKING A TIMEOUT 

The ladies huddle together during a timeout in order 

to figure out their next move. 

AVOIDING A BLOCK 

Chancie Dunn handles the ball in an expert manner tc 

avoid being blocked by a member of the other team. 



SCOREBOARD 





US 


THEM 


Virginia Tech 


33 


55 


Florida State 


47 


59 


Virginia 


47 


54 


N. Carolina 


52 


47 


NC State 


46 


62 


Wake Forest 


65 


94 


Duke 


37 


81 


Georgia Tech 


54 


63 


Virginia Tech 


55 


51 


Miami 


47 


68 


Maryland 


61 


91 


Virginia 


36 


68 


Boston College 


53 


56 


Wake Forest 


51 


63 


Florida State 


52 


64 


Georgia Tech 


50 


62 



Women's Basketball 




STAYING ON HER TOES 
Succeeding at basketball is all about 
making sure you stay alert and ready to 
make that crucial shot. 

Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 





OFFENSE ALL THE WAY 
Freshman Kelly Gramlich focuses on getting 
past NC State's defense in order to score. 
Photo by Taylor hSaquin 

NOTHING BUT NET 

Nikki Dixon gains momentum and air to make a slam 

dunk while the other wait on the edge of their seats. 

Photo by Courtney Jones 



Women's Basketball I ■ 129 



L 




DETERMINED SPIRIT 
Making sure to keep the ball 
away from his opponent, mid- 
fielder Alex Stockinger looks up 
the field tor a teammate. 



SCOREBOARD 



Swe 



raping the 
C>ompetition 



us 

UAB 1 

South Carolina 2 

Wake Forest 1 

Duke 2 

Charlotte 1 

NC State 2 

Gardner-Webb 2 

Virgina 

North Carolina 

Elon 

Boston College 2 

Furman 2 

Adelphi 2 

ETSU 1 

Maryland 2 
Wofford 1 

Virginia Tech 2 



After a difficult 2010-2011 season, 
men's soccer coach Mike Noonan was 
dedicated to preparing the young team for 
tough competition this year. While they faced 
some injuries at the beginning of the season, 
the men were able to integrate many of the 
freshmen and play as a team. They won both 
of their exhibition games against Davidson and 
Winthrop to start the season. Following the First 
Friday parade, the Tigers took on the Gamecocks 
in front of a record-breaking crowd of 7,423 
fans at Historic Riggs Field and were able to 
beat South Carolina with a score of 2-0. While 
several of the players had a successful season, 
freshman forward Brynjar Benediktsson was able 
to gain national recognition by being chosen 



By: Katherine Williams 

Greeks & Organizations Editor 

as an ACC Men's Soccer Player of the Week, 

and a National Soccer Coaches Association of 

America (NSCAA) National Player of the Week. 

The Clemson men's soccer program is on the 

rise after winning several games this year and 

finishing the year at .500. It is the team's first 

overall record of .500 or better since 2006. Also, 

the four ACC victories were the Tigers' most 

since 2000. While the men's team was eligible 

for the 2012 NCAA tournament, they were not 

selected to play. Coach Mike Noonan noted that 

while it was a disappointment to not be invited 

to play in this year's tournament, the young team 

can use that as motivation for the upcoming 

seasons. 



THEM 
2 

2 
5 
3 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 

3 
1 
1 
1 

1 






130 



Men's Soccer 




GOAL-BOUND 
Freshman defensive player, Phanuel 
Kavita makes sure to keep the hall 
on the other side of the field. 

Photo In Joshua Kelly 



CCWe have had a 
lot of adversity 
to overcome 
this year and 
our team has 
become closer 
because of it. yy 

- Bo Godwin 



Men's Soccer 



u 



131 




HEAD IN THE GAME 

Clemson makes a header in 
their game against USC. 
Photo by Jesse Von Fange 



SCOREBOARD 




ike 



amm 



Clemson women's soccer was established 
in 1994 and has consistently been among 
the best. Tracey Leone, a former U.S. National 
player, coached the first team which was ranked 
11th in the nation. The team plays on Riggs 
Field, which is seen by many as the premiere 
soccer stadium in the country. 

Women's soccer is undergoing a rebuilding year 
in the hopes that they will soon come back in 
the game as strong as ever. This year, the team 
gained ten newcomers and welcomed back 
eight starters. Freshman Liska Dobberstein 
was named to the 2011 ACC All-Freshmen 
Women's Soccer Team, and she is ranked 
second on the team in scoring. The team won 



By: Olivia Elswick 

junior Staff 



their first Senior Night since 2007 
victory against Francis Marion, and finished 
their season 6-12. "In this league, there are no 
easy games. You have to show up to compete. 
And you have to play well, and you have to play 
smart," Coach Eddie Radwanski states. 

Despite their rough record, the Tigers showed 
their skill and talent on the field. The Tigers 
will say goodbye to three seniors, Ashlynne 
Bass, Rachel Hurd, and Sarah Jacobs. The 
team has the passion and potential for great 
things, and with a bit more experience working 
together as a team, the women's soccer program 
is expected to accomplish great things in the 
near future. 






US 


THEM 


SC State 


7 


1 


Citadel 


1 





Presbyterian 


8 





App. State 


1 





Northeastern 


2 


1 


Miami 


2 


3 


Florida State 


2 


6 


Duke 





2 


Maryland 


1 


2 


Boston College 





4 


North Carolina 





2 


Virginia Tech 





3 


Virginia 





3 


NC State 


1 


2 


Wake Forest 





4 


Francis Marion 


4 






132 



a 



Women's Soccer 





BLOCKAGE 

Clemson maintains a strong defense to 

stay ahead in the game. 

A RUSH TO THE HEAD 
It takes gteat skill to control the 
hall using only one's head, and the 
women's soccer team definitely has 
that skill. 




always look 
for effort in my 
players, and 
this senior class 
always displayed *» 
tremendous effort. 

-Coach 
Radwanski 



,' 



Women's Soccer 



L 



133 



**G 





rtto 
ove 



By: Katie Guest 
Junior Staff 



/'""> lemson University's men's tennis started their season 
^^on Clemson turf on January 15th against College of 
Charleston with a win of 4-3. Clemson hosted nine home 
matches in total this season. The tennis team received good 
news this year about the expansion of the tennis facilities. In the 
next five years Clemson University is adding two indoor courts, 
revamping the two entrances to the outdoor courts, as well as 
building a new fan section, which will include a roof to cover all 
seating. This new project will cost approximately $5.1 million. 
The team also gained the renovation of the Duckworth Pavillion. 
The new building consists of a viewing deck to be used for social 
events and watching matches, as well as a kitchen and team 
meeting facilities on the first floor. 

Those on the team this year not only had national experience, 



but many had competed internationally in the past as well giving 
a leg up on the competition. Four starters and seven letter 
winners returned to the team this season. Returning players 
included Wes Moran, Yannick Maden, Zachary Rigsby, Gerardo 
Meza, Dominique Maden, and Aryton Wibowo under the 
direction of Head Coach Chuck McCuen and Assistant Coach 
John Boesch. Freshman Hunter Harrington from Spartanburg, 
SC and Cedric Willems from Hague, Netherlands joined the 
team, proving to be very strong assets. Not only did the team 
itself do well this season, but the team's former member Derek 
Difazio is currently training to be a professional tennis player 
after graduating in December '11, proving that Clemson's Men's 
Tennis maintains its success after graduation. 



GOING FOR IT 

It is important to make sure the bal 
does not get away from you. 

DOUBLE TROUBLE 

Doubles matches can be fun if you 
have enough coordination and skill. 




.ERVE-US! 

vu» • jfl One of the most crucial 
™ moments of the game is 
the serve at the beginning 
of the match. 
Photo b} Dawson Powers 



Men's Tennis 



L 



135 



*m 



core. Even 
some of the 
best teams 
I have ever 

had. yy 




136 



SMASH THAT 

The Lady Tigers crushed 

their opponent with a 

forehand winner. 
Photo by Cody Whitlock 



Women's Tennis 





SOLID ACES 

The Tigers aced their 
competition with their solid 
ground-strokes. 
Photo by Cody Whitlock 



SCOREBOARD 



Orda; on the 
Oourt 



By: Olivia Elswick 

Junior Staff 






US 


THEM 


Florida Int'l 


6 


1 


Cot C 


5 


2 


Winthrop 


6 


1 


UNC Wilmington 


4 





Purdue 


4 


2 


Furman 


7 





Michigan 





4 


Mississippi 


4 





Texas 


3 


4 



The woman's tennis ream plays at the Sloan 
Tennis Center, which has 4 indoor courts 
ind 21 outdoor hard courts that can host 700 
pectators. For the past eight seasons, Nancy 
darris, the women's head coach, has had 
inparalleled success on the court which included 
wo Final Fours, five straight NCAA appearances, 
he nation's number-one ranked singles player 
tnd doubles team, and two ACC titles. Clemson's 
op four singles players all returned from last 
eason and were joined by a great group t.^ 
inderclassmen. The three freshmen were key to 
)oth singles and doubles play. 

Seniors Josipa Bek and Keri Wong have also 
eached unmatched excellence for the past three 
easons. Combined they have won 178 singles 
natches and 204 doubles matches. Bek has been 



Ail-American in singles and doubles for the last 
season, becoming the tirst six-time All-American in 
school history. The two girls have the most wins of 
any doubles team in Clemson history. 

Nelly Ciolkowski entered her third season with 
a terrific record while representing her home 
country of France in the World University 
Games. Coach Harris tells, "She's playing the best 
tennis I've ever seen her play." Sophomore Klara 
Vyskocilova returned to the team following 21 
singles wins and 20 doubles wins. 

The team had one of the toughest schedules in the 
nation and faced seven ACC teams that are ranked 
in the top 17 nationally. Despite this, the Tigers 
were successful in having one of their best seasons 
yet and look forward to another great year. 



Women's Tennis 



L 



137 




"I'VE GOT IT!" 

Way to spike! Natalie Patzin was 
named one of the 2011 Atlantic 

Coast Conference Volleyna 
Conference Individual Leaders 




CC We're so excited about this 

treshman class. They're great 

athletes and very talented 

volleyball players. They have a 

legitimate opportunity to get 

on the court right away. 55 
- Coach Jordan Hoover 



138 



Volleyball 



ft 




By: 



Cansu Ozdemir returned for the 2011 
starting lineup. The Tigers also returned two 
veteran middle hitters: junior Alexa Rand, 
a 2009 ACC All-Freshman team member, 
and junior Sandra Adeleye, another 2009 
ACC All-Freshman team member and 2010 
All-ACC selection. The Tigers returned four 
sophomores from last year's freshman class, 
including All-ACC freshman Mo Simmons 
and Hannah Brenner. All of the setters for 
the Tigers have the opportunity to be led by 
first-year assistant coach Kelsey Murphy, a 
former four-year starter for the Tigers and the 
only player in ACC history to record 5,000 
assists, 1,000 digs, and 400 blocks in a career. 



Averie Wood 
Junior Staff 

Coach Hoover also added three freshmen 
to the 2011 squad, including setter Kamryn 
Sherman, Karis Watson, and Kristin Faust, 
who enrolled at the University in January and 
participated in spring games with the Tigers. 
The team also welcomed a new manager, 
Jessica Hayes. 

The Tigers' 2011 schedule was a challenging 
one, as they took on teams like Southern 
California, a 2010 Final Four participant, 
Florida, the top overall seed in the 2010 
NCAA Tournament, and took trips to NCAA 
participants Miami, Florida State, Virginia 
Tech, and North Carolina. 




BUMP, SET. 

Yaz spikes the ball to the other team to score for the 

Tigers. 

Photo frv Joshua Kelly 



SCOREBOARD 




US 


THEM 


Furman 


3 





Georgia Tech. 


3 





Wake Forest 


3 


1 


Duke 


2 


3 


North Carolina 


2 


3 


NC State 


3 


2 


Boston College 


3 


1 


Maryland 


3 


2 


Miami 





3 


Florida State 





3 


Virginia 


3 


1 


Virginia Tech 


2 


3 


Duke 


2 





Wake Forest 


3 


1 


Maryland 


3 


1 


Boston College 


3 


1 



Volleyball 



139 



w 




A GROUP EFFORT 

Rowers must work as a team if they 

want to come out on top with a win 

for Clemson. 

Photo by Courtney Jones 

PHOTO FINISH 

Races are often very close, with boats 

right next to each other. 

Photo by Courtney Jones 




cc 




Many of the participants are 
looking forward to the next time we 
host a ieam-to-row event. It was a 
fantastic community wide event, 
and a great joint venture between 
the Club and Varsity programs at 
Clemson. }} 

- Robbie Tenenbaum 



Kowing 



RovvUhat 

oat 




By: Kelsey Lundstrom 
Athletics Editor 



The women's rowing team hosted five 
regattas on Lake Hartwell this past season. 
Led by coach Robbie Tenenbaum, the women's 
team had a full schedule ahead of them with 
a young team overall. The Tigers opened their 
season on March 3rd as they hosted Eastern 
Michigan in the first of four straight home 
regattas. The team competed against big 
college names such as Purdue, Cornell, Boston 
University, and Notre Dame. 

With easy access to Lake Hartwell, the women's 
rowing team was always practicing between 
events and traveling. The team also had the 
honor of hosting the ACC Championship for 
the third straight season. Back in 2009, the 



women's rowing team captured the conference 
crown and had high hopes for similar success 
in following years. Aside from the sport itself, 
the team also hosted other events within the 
community. 

This past year, the Clemson rowing team 
hosted its first ever "Learn-to-Row" day on 
Lake Hartwell. The event was a hit and over 60 
participants joined the team for a morning on 
the lake. Not only did participants learn about 
the sport of rowing, they also raised over $1,000 
in memory of a senior rower's brother who was 
a victim of the tornados in Alabama. The team 
worked hard, gave back to the community, and 
had a great time doing it. 




HEAVY LOAD 

Preparation for races and packing up afterwards can 
he difficult, hut there are still fun times to be had. 
Photo b} Courtney Jones 

THE FINISH LINE 

It takes a lot of energy to complete a race, so rowers 
are very glad to see that they are nearing the end. 
Photo b^ Courtney Jones 




Rowing 



**e 




Coaches with 
C^haracter 



By: Kelsey Lundstrom 
Athletics Editor 



Bowl. The swimming and diving team celebrated its last year as 
a varsity sport at Clemson, which was very nostalgic for both 
the students and the coaches. The high academic standard held 
at Clemson is applied in the classroom as well as in the locker 
room. Coaches make sure that their players are keeping their 
nly have a history ot lead ins,' their teams to victory but also have minds sharp and focusing on their studies, which in turn can 



oaches can make a world of difference when it comes to 
the success of a team. Whether it is on the court or off, 
caches stand by their players and help them achieve greatness 
:hletically, academically, and socially. Clemson University is 
>rtuna££j:o have a great deal of outstanding coaches that not 



great deal of character. At the same time, the job can be very 
ressful and quite challenging. There is a lot of pressure to win 
lmes and earn notariety for both the team and the University, 
rom the training and practice sessions to the actual games 
lemsleves, these mem and women are very busy all year long 
rid it is not hard to see why their team members, the students 
f Clemson University, and the tans admire them. This year, 
ead football coach Dabo Swinney lead the football team all the 
ay to the ACC Championship and after a win, to the Orange 




help them on the field. Moral and ethical values are also instilled 
in each of the players by the coaches. Thus Clemson athletes 
leave the University as well-rounded and learned individuals, as 
well as talented swimmers, runners, volleyball players, etc. This 
process of molding student athletes into successful members of 
society is due in large part to the coaches and their dedication 
to their players. They show that Clemson athletics is not just 
definied by the number of games the teams win, but by the 
character ot the players and coaches. 

SWIMMING FOR SUCCESS 

The swim team relied on their coach 
during their last game before the 
program ended. 

HEAD IN THE GAME 

Men's basketball coach Brad Brownell 
keeps his players in the right mindset. 




** 




Fabulous 
Aacilities 



By: Olivia Elswick 
Junior Staff 



The facilities at Clemson University provide students with a courts are available for use in Fike, lake Hartwell is prime 

plethora of opportunites to become better athletes. Some rowing territory, and the intramural fields located on campus 

acilities have been around for decades, such as Death Valley and allow students to earn their reputation as some of the most 

liggs Field, and continue to serve the students by providing a athletic students in the nation. It is quite obvious by looking at 

jlace to practice as well as a place to host intense matches against the grounds of Clemson that the University takes pride in the 



)ther schools. Recently, Clemson began a series of renovations 
ind additions to the athletic facitiles, including a new set ot 
living platforms and a renovated pool in the Fike Recreation 
Center, a new golf facility and clubhouse, and new locker 
ooms for the football team. This year the University has put 
lot of effort into renovating old athletic facilities and adding 
lew ones, to ensure that no student with a passion for sports is 
eft wanting more. While the biddings, fields, and equipment 
ss-ociated with the varsity sports are very impressive, the club 
nd intramural facilities are no less outstanding. Five basketball 




students' fervor for athletics, and it makes sure that all needs are 
met (and then some). The sand volleyball courts located outside 
of Fike anel even next to Lightsey Bridge apartments provide a 
place for students to not only compete in club an intramural 
competitions, but also to relax and have fun with frienels. The 
same is true for the other athletic facilities. The basketball fields 
of Fike are often useel for entertainment purposes for students 
who enjoy a game of "hoops" every now anei then. Relay for Life 
was also held on the intramural fields. The facilities on campus 
are truly a wonderful addition to the Clemson experience. 

THE MASTERS AT CLEMSON. 7 

The newly constructed golf facility 
provides an atmosphere similar to that 
of the Augusta National Golf Course. 

THE OPEN WATER 
Students can come to the Fike 
Recreation Center to enjoy a relaxing 
swim or a hard-core workout. 




CLASSIC CLEMSON 

Riggs Field has been a part of Clemson 

University for decades and continues to 

play host to a variety ot sporting events. 

Photo by Courtney Jones 



Foditie 



*. 



145 



"W 




CLEMSON ORANGE 

The Tigers celebrate the ACC win by decorating 

the statue of Thomas G. Clemson with oranges in 

preparation for the Orange Bowl. 

Photo by Courtney Jones 




ALL ABOUT LOYALTY 

Loyal tiger fans travel to Miami, 

FL to cheer on their Tigers in the 

Orange Bowl. 

Photo fry Anna Lauren Meeks 



146 



Jl 



ACC Championship and Orange Bowl 




ACC^pnd Solid 

range 




By: Courtney Jones 
junior Staff 



"^ tepping out of the tunnel with the Carolina Panther 
^J Stadium rising up around you and a record breaking 
lumber of fans all screaming their heads off is an experience 
ike no other. The ACC Championship game against Virginia 
~ech brought a sea of orange to Charlotte, NC. Excitement 
vzs something you could literally teel surrounding you in the 
tadium. Even President Barker came to support his Tigers, and 
le started the game off by singing the national anthem with a 
ootball field sized American flag spread across the field held 
)y hundreds of Boy Scouts. The excitement grew to an extreme 
s our Tigers sprinted out of the tunnel through fire on either 
ide, and onto the field ready for a victory. Tajh Boyd threw 
ompleted passes left and right, leading to the offense making 
ouchdown after touchdown. The defense also did a spectacular 
pb, only allowing Virginia Tech to score one touchdown. With a 



resulting score of 38-10, the team and the fans were insane with 
joy. Oranges were being thrown from the stands onto the field, 
crates of oranges were everywhere, the players were all biting into 
oranges as they celebrated. With the smell of oranges strong in 
the air, the team hoisted Coach Dabo onto their shoulders and 
proudly held up the ACC Championship trophy. After the win, 
students prepared for the Orange Bowl in Miami, FL by filling 
the campus with oranges. From Bowman field to the statue of 
Thomas G. Clemson, the whole campus smelled like oranges. CJ 
Spiller even traveled down to Miami to be with the team on the 
big day. Nothing could be better than loyal Tiger fans celebrating 
in Miami. The team played their hardest, and even though the 
end was not what we hoped for, the fans will remain loyal Tigers 
for life. And, as Coach Dabo would say, "You can tweet that." 




CELEBRATE GOOD TIMES 
The players celebrate with Coach 
Dabo Swinney by lifting their proud 
coach onto their shoulders. 

A MOMENT TO REMEMBER 
Coach Dabo yells encouraging words 
to his team during the Orange Bowl. 

TRUE CHAMPIONS 

The Tigers enthusiastically celebrate as 
they accept the ACC Championship 
trophy. 




ACC Championship and Orange Bowl 



** 




GO TIGERS 

Clemson golfers show their spirit 
with Clemson Tiger clubs 

HIT IT HARD 

A muddy turf creates 
obstacles for goiters 



EYE ON THE PRIZE 

The players decide which club should be used 

at each hole 

Photo courtesy of IPTAY 



Coach Larry Penley 






it up! 



By: Keelia Faber, 
Athletics Editor 



For the first time in nearly ten years, Clemson 
University's Men's Golf Team did not include 
any senior players. Nevertheless, the players ranked 
high in all of the tournaments they played on both 
individual and overall team levels. 

The fall 2010 season began with a great 
performance at the Carpet Classic, where the team 
was ranked 3rd of 12 teams. Jacob Burger played 
an individual best round of seven under par and 
David Dannelly finished a round five under par 67. 

Clemson's golfers continued their season at 
courses in Georgia, Oklahoma, Florida, North 
Carolina, and Puerto Rico. The team came in first 
place at the Furman Invitational, where they were 
16 under par. 



One outstanding achievement made by Clemson's 
team in 2011 was placing 3rd in the 58th annual 
ACC Men's Golf Championship. Clemson 
finished under par by three, with Crawford 
Reeves setting a career best round of five under 
par 67. Upon entering the tournament, the team 
was ranked 6th in the ACC, but placed ahead of 
Virginia, NC State, and Wake Forest, which were 
all higher-ranked teams. 

In May of 2011, after such a successful year, the 
team was invited to play in the NCAA South 
Central Regional in Erie, CO at the Colorado 
National Course. Here they finished five under par 
and ranked 7th oi 13. Overall the tigers had a very 
successful season. 




TAKING A SWING 

Concentration is key to 
a successful swing 
Photo courtesy of IPTAY 



SCOREBOARD 




FINISH 


Carpet Classic 


3rd of 12th 


Ping Preview 


13th of 15th 


The Brickyard 


7th of 15th 


US Collegiate 


12th of 15th 


Jacksonville Invitational 


5th of 15th 


Puerto Rico Classic 


9th of 15th 


USCA Cleveland Classic 


6th of 18th 


Furman Invitational 


1st of 22nd 


Insperiry Augusta 


3rd of 17th 


State Invitational 




ACC Tournament 


3rd of 11th 


NCAA S. Central 


7th of 13th 


Regional 





Golf 



149 



*w? 




Spreading the 
Spirit 



By: Alix Drye 

Junior Staff 



LEADERS OF SPIRIT 
The cheerleaders perform 
stunts to excite the crowd at 
a football game. 
Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 




One of the things that makes Clemson such a 
special place is the school spirit. Most students 
go all out in supporting our sports teams, but a 
select few take it a step further. The Clemson 
cheerleaders dedicate most of their time to 
pumping up the crowd so that they can help 
our teams play their very best. As student 
athletes, a lot of their time is taken up by extra 
practices and preparing for games, leaving little 
free time for social activities, but they remain 
deciicated to promoting school spirit. 

Between practice during the week and games 
on the weekends, the cheerleaders' main goal 
is "to promote fan participation and keep the 
fans energetic," says sophomore Trent James. 
"That way the players are pumped for the game 



and perform better." Although most schools 
have a cheerleading squad to help lead them to 
victory, Clemson's squad is different in that it 
"not only cheers for football but we also cheer 
for other small teams that don't always have as 
many attendees, like volleyball and women's 
basketball," says James. 

If the fans begin to lose faith when the Tigers 
aren't playing as expected, the cheerleaders 
are always there to reignite the passion and 
excitement. Although Clemson's fans are 
incredibly dedicated and passionate, it is safe to 
say that sporting events would not be the same 
without the Clemson cheerleaders helping to 
energize the crowd. With spirit abound, they 
certainly know how to spread the excitement. 



150 



Cheerleading 





DEVOTION TO SPIRIT 

The cheerleaders are a vital part of 
the energetic atmosphere at Clemson 
basketball games. 

OUTSIDE THE STADIUM 
Walking in parades to promote school 
spirit is just one of the many activities 
cheerleaders participate in. 



CC| chose to cheer 
for Clemson 
because 
Clemson has 
been my dream 
school since I was 
younger and I 



love to tumble 
- Trent James 



» 



Cheerleading 



151 



mz 




SPREADING SPIRIT 

The Rally Cats pump up the fans at 

the men's basketball game. 

TEARING UP THE FIELD 

The girls perform one of their 

signature daces for the football 

crowd. 




TIGER RAG 

The Rally Cats perform to "Tiger 
Rag," as is their tradition at every 
home game. 
Photo by Fatema Hakimji 




^fclemson Rally Cats placed 5th in 
Daytona, Florida at NDA Collegiate 
Nationals! It has been a great year with 
14 amazing girls. While we always hate 
to see our seniors graduate, we look 
forward to seeing what new taleent we 
will add to our team. >) 

- The Clemson Rally Cats 






Rally Cats 





Just 
Z^ance 



By: 



Clemson's official all-girl dance team is 
known as the Rally Cats. The Rally Cats 
attend and perform at many of Clemson's spirit 
and athletic events, which include basketball 
games, football games, Tigerama, and pep 
rallies. The dancers are skilled in modern hip 
hop, pom style dancing and jazz. 

In order to prepare for the upcoming Clemson 
events and football season, the Rally Cats 
attend training camp before the fall semester 
begins. They also participate in multiple weekly 
practices and attend morning workouts two 
days a week with an athletic strength and 
conditioning trainer. The Rally Cats work hard, 
to nor only stay in prime physical shape, but to 




Devin Gibson 
Junior Staff 



also stay on top of their academic lifestyle. They 
attend study hours each week and have access 
to tutors. 

When these girls perform at Clemson's 
spirited events, they are no doubt the center 
of attention. Their purple pants and orange 
sequin outfits are eye catching and scream 
Clemson pride. One of the main traditions 
the Rally Cats are known for is performing 
to "Tiger Rag" between the third and fourth 
quarters of every football game right in front of 
"The Hill." 

These talented girls are a favorite of students 
and fans alike, and their spirit, as well as their 
talent, increases Clemson pride. 



JUST DANCE 

The Rally Cats do a jazz routine for the excited 

basketball spectators. 

Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 

SHAKE IT UP 

The girls pertorm at one of their annual dance 

competitions. 

Photo by Courtney Jones 




Rally Cats 



m 




TALENTED TIGERS 

One Tiger Twirler member juggles 

three batons at once during the 

halftime performance. 




**The focus of every performance is 
to represent ourselves, the band, 
and the university with class, 
dignity, and respect by performing 
rehearsed and choreographed 
material to the best of our ability. » 

- The Tiger Dancers and Twirlers 



154 BBiH Twirlers and Dancers 



-*k. 



1 




Clemson shakes and 
3pins 



By: Lauren Beretich 
Junior Staff 



The field lit up when Clemson's twirlers 
and dancers took the field during the 
2011 season. Clemson University is known for 
having "the hand that shakes the Southland," 
hut that title did not only come from the talent 
of the marching hand's musicians. Although 
Clemson fans everywhere couldn't take their 
eyes oft the plays, during halt-time all eyes 
were on Clemson's Tiger Twirlers and Tiger 
Dancers. These performers composed two- 
thirds ot the Tiger Band Auxiliary. They worked 
with the Tiger Band to enhance the visual 
appeal of their performance. The Tiger Twirlers 
and Tiger Dancers performed anytime the full 
hand performed: at pep rallies, parades, and 
home football games. They even took part in 



the First Friday Parade. 

Although Tiger Twirlers and Tiger Dancers 
both perform with the Tiger Band, these groups 
are very different. Tiger Twirlers combine dance 
with one or more batons in their routines. 
Tiger Dancers use dance and poms in their 
routines. These talented ladies dedicated over 
15 hours each week to practice. For a pre- 
game performance alone, these women were 
responsible tor knowing routines to Tiger 
Fanfare, Sock It To 'Em, Tiger Rag, Eye ot the 
Tiger, Modified Sock It To 'Em, and Short 
Rag. These hard-working women made each 
Clemson halt-time show just as memorable as 
the Clemson football game itselt. 




ON THE FIELD 

Tiger Twirler member shines in 

the spotlight during the Orange 

Bowl halt-rime performance. 

Photo rrv Anna Lauren Meeks 



Twirlers and Dancers 



L 



155 



*m 





156 



Ji 




in' the 
eat 



By: Lauren Dailey 
Junior Staff 



Tiger Band is the marching band for 
Clemson University. The band consisted 
of students playing both wind instruments 
and percussion instruments. There were also 
auxiliary units that included the color guard, 
twirlers, and dancers. Students in the band 
are from a diverse range of backgrounds 
and majors. As the "Band that Shakes the 
Southland," no Clemson football game would 
have been complete without Tiger Band's 
performances during every play, pass, and 
touchdown, as well as before the game and at 
halftime. The band did not let away games get 
in the way of their school spirit, as they were 
one of the few in the country that traveled with 
the football team. 



The 2011-2012 Tiger Band was led by band 
directors Dr. Spede, Mr. Hurlburt, Dr. Buyer, 
and Mr. Kent. The band began practice before 
the first week of school in August to be fully 
prepared for the first game. Students showed 
their hard work during rehearsals that were 
held on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays 
from 4 to 6 pm, and Saturday mornings before 
home football games. 

Tiger Band is a vital component of school spirit 
that everyone looks forward to at University 
events. "Tiger Rag," a Clemson tradition since 
1942, is always a favorite that gets fans pumped 
up and cheering for the "most exciting 25 
seconds of college football." 



Tiger Band 





TIC.ER BAND AUXILIARY 
The dancers, twirlers, and guard work 
with the hand to add to the visual 
appeal to the performances. 

READY TO PERFORM 
Tiger Band has to be ready to perform 
in front of crowds of up to 80,000 in 
Death Valley. 




ON THE FIELD 

Band members ran to their 
positions on the field in 
preparation of the haltime show 
Pfioto hy Anna Lauren Mecks 



This year's motto 
was "Guardians 
of the Clemson 
Spirit" and that's 
exactly what 
we did at every 
football game. ^ 



Dr. Spede 



Tiger Band 



L 



157 



wm 



CLEMSON SPIRIT 

The Pershing Rifles begin the 

football game traditions with the 

marching of the colors. 

Photo by Courtney ]ones 



HARD WORK PAYS OFF 

The group is all-smiles after 

winning the National Drill 

Competition. 

Photo try Pershing Rifles 



eeping history 

aj I \ / ^ By: Kellie Hawkins 
H V W Junior Staff 



Since 1939, Company C-4 of the Pershing Rifles is a 
professional military fraternity that works hard to keep 
the military history of Clemson University alive. Commanded 
by Captain Jesse Mahn, the team participates in different 
activities on campus and throughout the Clemson community 
in order to honor our heritage. 

The Company performs as the color guard at football, baseball, 
and basketball games, while also participating in celebrations 
on campus such as Tigerama and Veteran's Day. They also 
participate in 21-gun salutes, funerals, and other ceremonies 
throughout the community. 

One thing that the Pershing Rifles take great pride in is 
competing at the General John Joseph Pershing National Drill 
Competition every spring. They have won 6 times within the 
last 7 years, and they plan to continue this streak. Their hard 
work pays off, and they continue to keep our history alive. 





COLORING THE FIELD 

Company C-4 marches onto the 

field to present our flags before 

the football game. 

PKoto courtesy of Pershing Rifles 



Pershing Rifles 



THE MOTIVATOR 
When you are told to do push- 
ups by a person yelling and also 
doing push-ups, it is hard not to 
be motivated. 
Photo by Anna Lauren Meelcs 




OnUcthe strong 
jSurvive 



By: Katie Guest 
Junior Staff 



Clemson's ROTC has been very busy this year. They 
completed their CWST lab (Combat Water Survival 
Training) in which they completed several exercises, including 
a 10-minute swim, 5-minute tread water, and the 10-meter 
combat swim, which consists of swimming the Fike pool in 
their uniform. There was also a 3-meter water entry where 
cadets jumped oft the high dive blind-folded with Ml 6 rifles 
and then had to remove the blindfold upon entering the 
water, and then swim to the side, all while keeping track of all 
their equipment. 

The next lab completed taught cadets basic tactics, such as 
traveling techniques within different size elements. Land 
navigation was also taught during the lab, where cadets were 
given grid coordinates and had to plot their points on a map. 
Then they had to navigate through the woods in order to find 
points, using only a protractor and a compass. 



INSPIRATION 
The Tiger mascot inspires the 
ROTC to continue doing push- 
ups before a cheering crowd. 

Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 




TIGER TRADITION 
The Tiger mascot does a number 
ot push-ups equivalent to 
Clemson's football score. 
Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 



ROTC 



159 



m* 



PLAYING FOR CLEMSON 

Volleyball gets serious when 

students are defending the honor 

of their Alma Mater. 



SETTING IT UP 

Clemson players set the ball up 

for a spike as they play against 

Furman University 





for the 



By: Brittany Bundrick 

Managing Editor 



Bump, set, spike! The men's club volleyball team at 
Clemson did just that. This year, the interest was so large 
they had to hold tryouts. After narrowing the team down 
to the 12 best guys, they got to work. They practiced two or 
three days a week for two hours. During practice, the guys ran 
various drills giving all players the ability to work on improving 
their strengths and weaknesses, whether it's serving, passing, 
setting, or spiking skills. They also held scrimmages to practice 
their offensive and defensive plays. 

The team participated in one or two tournaments a month, 
stretching from South Carolina to Tennessee to Florida. 
In October, they played in a local tournament at Furman 
University in Greenville, SC. The guys placed first, defeating 
the University of South Carolina, Furman, and Presbyterian 
College. This year, the team elected sophomore Sam Nadler 
as their club president. In November, he said he was very 
pleased with the athleticism and the enthusiasm of the team 
this year and optimistic about the upcoming years. 





TRUE SKILI 

Quick reflexes and genuii 

athletic ability is needed 

succeed in these volleyball gamt 



Men's Club Volleyball 



HARDCORE 

The women playing club 
volleyball ar Clemson do nor rake 
rhe game lightley. 
Photo courtesy of Morgan Cross 




JTpike it 



By: Olivia Elswick 
Junior Staff 



Clemson's women's club volleyball team allowed female 
Clemson students to play volleyball on a competitive 
level with othet players who shared their passion. Combining 
friendship, competition, and teamwork, the team's dedication 
showed on and off the court. The club played against other 
college club teams in tournament style play. This past fall, 
the team came in 3rd place out of nine teams at Vanderbilt. 
The two evenly matched teams practiced each Tuesday and 
Thursday at Fikc. 

Each tall and spring the team hosts tournaments at Clemson 
University. The tall tournament featured teams such as 
Auburn, University ot South Carolina, College of Charleston, 
Furman, and Presbyterian College. Freshman Angele 
Drouihet said, "It's really fun to play volleyball with people 
that truly love volleyball. It's pretty relaxed but it's really fun 
because it's just us girls. We don't have a coach, but we coach 
ourselves." 



JUMPING FOR IT 

The ball is launched into rhe 

air to prepare tor a quick and 

accurate spike. 

Photo courtesy of Morgan Cross 




IT'S A WIN 

Players celehrare afrer a well 
deserved win at demon's own 
Fike Recrearion Center. 
Photo courtesy of Morgan Cross 



Women's Club Volleyball | | 161 



PITCHING TO WIN 

A great deal of concentration is 

needed to pitch the ball in such a 

way as to earn a strike. 

Photo by Courtney ]ones 



With the game on the line, Evan 

Andert steps up to hat hoping for 

that epic homerun. 

Photo (ry Courtney ]ones 



£ 



xpenence 



is key 




Clemson's club baseball beam has always had a major 
presence in club sports play in the Southeast. They face 
teams from all over the country, including the University of 
South Carolina, Georgia, and Connecticut. 

As the team was preparing for their 2012 season, freshman 
and new arrival to the team, Kelan Drake-Lavelle, had a very 
positive outlook on how the year would turn out for the revved 
up players. He said, "the majority of the team that went 20-5 
a year ago is returning. We should have a talented team with 
plenty of experience, and our team chemistry and hard work 
will hopefully take us to regionals and further." 

The experience of the returning players had indeed already 
paid off with the team's first outing against Ohio University. 
They took the series and moved on to face the rest of their 
exciting schedule that lay ahead. 




READY FOR ANYTH INC 

One never knows what might b 

coming during the game, so th 

catcher must be prepared 

Photo by Courtney Jone 



Club Baseball 



DRAW YOUR SWORD 
Club Fencers are now 
implementing and using 
knowledge of all three weapons 
one can use in the sport-foil, 
epee and sabre. 
Courtesy of Club Fencing 






on your 
uard 



By: Katie Simmons 
Layout Editor 



En garde is an expression used in fencing for the 
opponents to face one another and assume a ready 
stance. Consequently, it is no wonder as to why this particular 
expression is the one that enters into a person's mind most 
often when thinking oi the sport. However, there is so much 
more to it than that. 

Clemson's own fencer's club is an officially recognized sports 
club as well as one of the largest in the state. Most of" the 
members also belong to the U.S. Fencing Association, which 
provides the club with good practice as they compete in 
tournaments on all levels, from local to international. Club 
members teach one another basic principles of the sport and 
practice in order to improve their skills. Their hard work 
pays off, as they place high in their tournaments, like the 
32nd Annual Collegiate Temple Open, which was held in 
Philadelphia, PA in November. 



RACKING UP POINTS 
A Clemson fencer scores a point 
during a tournament by striking 
her opponent in the correct place 
and with good form. 
Courtesy of Club Fencing 



LEAN ON ME 
Members still find time to spend 
time with friends as well as each 
other. Enjoying a good laugh or 
talking about non-club events is a 
great way to release stress, tension 
and anxiety, and to pass the time 
until their turn to compete. 
Courtesy of Club Fencing 



■ 



Club F 



enctng 



L 



163 



PURE ADRENALINE 

Nothing screams adrenaline 

junky like an actual scream 

as you jump out of a moving 

airplane. 

Photo courtesy of the Skydiving Club 



HOLD ON! 

Clemson skydivers know that 

true friendships are forged while 

falling to the earth with nothing 

but a parachute and each other. 

Photo courtesy of the Skydiving Club 



High in the 



By: Alec Gibson 
Editor in Chief 




The members of the Clemson University skydiving club 
are known as the Dixie Skydivers. Operating out of their 
own dropzone, the Flying Tigers Sport and Parachute Center, 
the Dixie Skydivers are a sight to see. Students often marvel 
at their acrobatics and seemingly non-existent fear of heights. 
Student skydivers have a true passion for the sport and are 
constantly recruiting new members and teaching others 
to skydive with great ease. One can often see them as they 
parachute to the ground, and visitors always seem to enjoy 
watching them in action. However, one cannot simply join 
the club and begin skydiving. To become a Dixie Skydiver, 
one must first practice with a static line jump, during which 
the parachute is released immediately after jumping from the 
plane. After five static line jumps and three practice ripcord 
pulls it is time to fly into air, strap on all of the gear, and jump 
into the blue skies above Clemson University. 



THE VIEW FROM UP HERE 

Skydiving at Clemson gives students 

a unique oportunity to view Clemson 

(and the world) from a perspective 

that few get to experience. 

Photo courtesy of the Skydiving Club 



164 



Jl 



Club Skydiving 



DANGEROUS TERRITORY 
Students must be careful as they 
raft down dangerous rivers and over 
waterfalls, both very large and very small. 
Photo courtesy of the WWR Club 





d the river 
end 



By: Alec Gibson 
Editor in Chief 



Whitewater rafting is not an easy endeavor, and the 
students that choose to undertake this task certainly 
have their work cut out for them. At the same time, it can 
be one of the most thrilling and enjoyable experiences at 
Clemson. Students practice in the safety of a pool before going 
out onto the open river and experiencing first-hand what 
the sport entails. Club whitewater rafting gives individuals 
opportunities to ride the rapids of various rivers across the 
upstate of South Carolina. This not only provdes exciting 
adventure but also yields some of the most beautiful scenery 
in the entire state. Honing one's skills at whitewater rafting 
is not an easy task, but the club allows students to practice 
and learn various aspects of the sport, including terminology, 
sattely guidelines, and rescue techniques. The abilities gained 
through the club are able to be carried with students long 
after they graduate from Clemson. 




ROCK BOTTOM 

Rocks pose a significant threat 

to rafters. Fortunately, the club 

provides students with the skills 

to deal with them. 

Photo courtesy of the WWR Club 



TRULY BEAUTIFUL 

Members of Club Whitewater 
Rafting are given the opportunity 
to see the amazing beauty of 
South Carolina. 
Photo courtesy of the WWR Cluh 



Club Whitewater Rafting 



6m 



165 



PROTECTION 

Keepting the hall away from the 

opponent is essential. 

Photo provided by the Men's Team 



TO THE OTHER SIDE 

Clemson gains possesion of the 

ball, now it is just a matter of 

getting it to the opposing goal. 

Photo provided by the Men's Team 




Mo\Apg down the 



ield 



By: Lauren Dailey 
Junior Staff 



The Clemson men's club soccer team is comprised of about 
forty players with both undergraduate and graduate 
students. The team is also proud to have many international 
players. Funded by the Clemson Office of Campus Recreation 
as well as player dues and fundraisers, the men's club soccer 
team is completely student-run. 

They compete against club teams from universities in the 
ACC, SEC, and other schools in the region. They also 
participate in several tournaments, such as Soctoberfest and 
Spring Shindig, and each semester, Clemson hosts its own 
tournament. Doing well in regional tournaments gives the 
players the chance to compete at the national level, which is 
based on rankings by the National Intramural Recreational 
Sports Association. The team is also part of the Southeast 
Collegiate Soccer Alliance which is a new league created to 
allow for more competitive play. 




A WIN IN SIGHT 

Number 7 Ryan Fielden prepares to head 

towards the goal in an attempt to score for 

Clemson and his team. 

Photo provided by Men's Club Soccer Team 



Men's Club Soccer 



SWEEPING THE COMPETITION 
This defensive player concentrates on 
keeping the ball away from her goal. 
, Photo by Joshua Kelly 





!!i!lii 



ing off the 
ompetition 

By: Katherine Williams 
Greeks & Organizations Editor 

With nationals in mind, the women's club soccer team 
practiced three nights a week for months and traveled 
within the southeast region to compete with a number of 
universities and colleges. "Being on the women's club soccer 
team is a blast! I love the competitiveness of our team and 
how we all strive to do our best. It is a big time commitment, 
but I wouldn't have it any other way," says sophomore 
Madeline Fellaborn. This year's team consisted of twenty one 
girls, ten of which were new to the club team, and Coach 
Caitlin Brougham made sure to prepare the young group for 
competition. Following last year's winning season, the girls 
took second place at the annual Socctoberfest tournament 
hosted by the Clemson University men's and women's club 
soccer teams. The girls played in the regional tournament in 
Rock Hill, South Carolina in October, and hope to travel to 
Phoenix, Arizona to compete at nationals. 



PROTECTING THE GOAL 

Making sure to stop the hall from 
reaching the goal line, the goalie 
makes sure to stay low. 

Photo by Joshua Kelly 




WHAT A KICK 
The women of the Club Soccer 
team really know how to kick the 
competition to the curb. 
Photo by Joshua Kelly 



Women's Club Soccer 



L 



167 



PRACTICE MAKES 

PERFECT 

The team warms up before the 

big game. 

Photo r>\ Joshua Kelh 



EXCEPTIONAL SPEED 

The Clemson players have to be 

quick and efficient to escape the 

other team when taking the ball 

down the field. 

Photo by Joshua Kelly 




Rusljing down the 
ield 



t\ 



By: Kellie Hawkins 

Junior Staff 



Club sports are the perfect way to get involved at Clemson. 
One of the more popular sports is men's club rugby, 
which was founded in 1967. According to team member 
Lennon Murphy, "Rugby is a great way to meet a lot of new 
people and have a blast. It also provides a great chance to 
compete with other schools and represent Clemson well." 
The team is open to any males who want to play the sport, 
regardless of experience. 

This year's team, coached by Justin Hickey, was very dedicated 
and practiced every day of the week. Matches were held on 
Fridays during the fall semester, and the team played in 
the Atlantic Coast Rugby League during the spring, which 
allowed them to compete against other ACC schools. The 
boys were very competitive as they put all of their hard work 
into creating a successful team. Anyone who wants to stay 
active and become involved is strongly encouraged to try out. 




STRIVING FOR A GOAL 

Clemson gains possession of the 

ball and rushes to make a goal. 

Photo by Joshua Kelly 



Men's Rugby 



MUSICAL MOTIVATION 

Lil' Wayne's quote "Train all year to be 

the enemy's misery," has grown to be the 

club's motto of domination. 

Photo by Cody White lode 






uck and Roll 



By: Olivia Elswick 

Junior Staff 



Clemson's women's club rugby team has been kicking 
it since 1995, when Frank Graziano, coach of the 
men's team, was interested in forming a women's team. The 
team had a slow start in the spring of 1996 when they had 
few members and only one organized match. By fall 1996, 
however, Clemson's women's club rugby had a full team and 
full game schedule. They finished the semester with a winning 
season and have continued this every season since. The team 
practices three days a week and is constantly recruiting new 
members. Sophomore member Samantha Paris says that in 
practice, "Generally, we will do two cardio drills to improve 
our fitness, a few tackling drills, and we will also split up and 
work on position specific skills." Their dedication and hard 
work can be seen on and off the pitch, leading the team to 
consistently be one of the best teams in the South. 




ALWAYS ON GUARD 

Protecting the goal is essential if 

the Tigers want to earn a win. 

Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 



ON THE MOVE 

Lacrosse players are constantly 

in motion, running around the 

field trying to get the ball. 

Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 




Nothjna but 
/Yet 



By: Alix Drye 

Junior Staff 



Not every athletic student can play on a varsity sports 
team at Clemson. Some simply don't have the time 
and others don't want to make such a large commitment. For 
these students, Clemson University offers cluh sports. One of 
the more popular club sports available to Clemson students is 
lacrosse. There are both women's and men's lacrosse teams, 
and both are a great way to connect with people that have a 
love for the game. Sophomore AH Johnson says that she loves 
"the excitement and exhilaration that you get when you're 
running down the field with the ball or you just make a great 
play. It's the best feeling in the whole world." Students on club 
teams travel to compete with other colleges, and club lacrosse 
has a very busy schedule. "The best part about playing a club 
sport is the bond that you create with all the girls. We are all 
there because we love to play lacrosse and it really connects us 
and brings us together," says Johnson. 





ALMOST GOT IT! 

This lacrosse player attempts to 

catch the ball as it comes flying 

toward him. 

Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 



Club Lacrosse 



J 



A. QUICK EYE 

When playing paintball you have 
to keep your eyes alert at all times 
if you want that perfect shot. 
Photo courtesy of the Paintball Club 




7\/~* 



Tiger 
3pots 



By: Kelsey Lundstrom 

Athletics Editor 



Paintball is a unique club sport here at Clemson 
University 7 . The team played their first tournament of 
the season on September 24th, 2011 in Greenville, South 
Carolina. The team played Western Kentucky in the playoffs 
and rallied to eliminate all five of the Kentucky players in 
the second point. Despite the comeback, the point was 
ruled a tie because a Clemson player did not get checked 
by a referee before leaving the field. Overall, Clemson 
placed fifth out of the fourteen teams in the tournament. 

For home tournaments, the team plays at the PBC Paintball 
Park, which is also located in Greenville. Tournaments take 
place all over the area in places such as Chattanooga, Tennessee 
and Greensboro, North Carolina. Weekly meetings are held 
at 8 pm every Thursday and the team is always looking to add 
new members. 



THE RUN AROUND 
Paintball players have to run 
around quite a lot during a 
typical game. 
Photo courtesy of the Paintball Clul 



THE DIVE 

Players will do just about 

anything to avoid being hit, 

including diving head-first onto 

the ground. 

Photo courtesy of the Paintball Club 



Club Paintball I I 171 



TEAM BONDING 

The sailing team stops for a pose 

on one o{ their boats during a 

team practice. 

Photo by Spencer Kohn 



LINING UP 

Several members start to line up 

at their boats before setting sail 

on the water. 

Photo by Spencer Kohn 



J>et Sai 




Located in the midst of several beautiful lakes, Clemson 
offers many club sports that utilize these aquatic 
surroundings. The sailing club has a beautiful clubhouse 
located on Lake Hartwell, just minutes away from campus. 
Newcomers can attend classes at this clubhouse to get them 
more acquainted. If they pass the competency tests, they are 
given the code to the equipment room and are allowed out 
on the lake. Many students are attracted to this club because 
of the appeal of being out on the water with fellow students. 

Each year, nearly 100 members take advantage of this club. 
Some join to learn more about sailing and others join for 
the camaraderie. More experienced members participate in 
intercollegiate regattas across the Southeast while others take 
learn to sail classes. Regardless of a student's reason to join 
the club, there is always room for more and a guaranteed good 
time out on the water! 




SUNSET SAI LINK 

Spencer Kohn enjoys an evenin 

out on the water with a nice vie' 

of the lake behind hin 

Photo by Anna Lauren Meel 



Club Soiling 



WHAT A GREAT BUNCH 
Six of the team's fantastic 
members take a picture break 
after their meet. 
Photo by Cody Whitlock 





Bend it to 



Mr 



in it! 



By: Averie Wood 
junior Staff 



t; 



he Clemson co-ed club gymnastics team was established 
in September 2006 by Ngaire Mitchell and Stefanie 
Taphouse to help bring gymnastics to Tiger Town. The team 
competes yearly at the National Association of Intercollegiate 
Gymnastics Clubs (NAIGC) and is the only club gymnastics 
team in South Carolina. Members range in skill from beginner 
to expert and anyone is welcome to join. The club is a great 
opportunity for college students to continue or take up the art 
of gymnastics in a fun and relaxed atmosphere. The 2011-2012 
president Corey Meenan does a great job at making the club 
activities and competitions run smoothly. Each year, money is 
put into a fund that will be used for scholarships. The team 
practices up to four days a week at Upstate Gymnastics Center 
in Pendleton, SC, about ten minutes away. 




TAKING A STANCE 
Mellisa Kerwin takes the floor. 
Photo by Cody Whitlock 

IN IT TO WIN IT! 

A successful completion o( a 

high-bar routine is good news for 

the Clemson gymnasts. 

Photo by Cody Whitlock 



Club Gymnastic 






173 



SHOWING OFF 

Clemson's Equestrian team 

placed in several events at 

Barry College. 

Photo by Courtney Jones 



RIDING HIGH 

CUET members cheered 

on their teammates at a 

competition. 

Photo by Amanda Mauro 





howing 
Talent 



By: Olivia Elswick 
Junior Staff 



Clemson University's Equestrian Team, or CUET, 
welcomes all members of the Clemson University 
community to participate in the club. The team traveled to 
other schools in the region, where the host school supplied 
horses and tack for Clemson's riders. The team was coached 
by Kristi Smith of Tiger Brook Stables in Seneca, South 
Carolina, who used a personalized approach to lessons to 
ensure that each student gained as much as possible from 
each lesson. "It's a really good opportunity for riders of all 
skill levels to get together and show. People of all levels with 
different experience come together to compete. It's a lot of 
fun with minimal costs and is a great experience to be able 
to continue riding in college. Not a lot of other schools have 
equestrian teams and we are really fortunate," says sophomore 
Victoria Drechio. "We also have a large team. Our team is 
probably two to ten times as big as other school's teams." 





HORSE FACE 
Each rider and their horse can 
compete in up to two events in 
each show. 
Photo bj Courtney Jones 



Club Equestrian 



Jl 



GETTING KICKED INTO SHAP 
Melissa Dunphy and Travis Roberts 
practice their roundhouse kicks. 
Photo courtesy of Julien Boyon 





Camaraderie 



• through 
'cks 



J^c 



By: Anna Lauren Meeks 

Photography Editor 



The Clemson Tae Kwon Do Club was established in 1967 by 
Master Billy Hong. Celebrating its 45th year ot existence, 
the Tae Kwon Do club is one of the oldest clubs of the university. 
The purpose of the club is to otter university students and faculty 
an opportunity to receive traditional training in the Korean art of 
self-defense. The students that are a part of the club derive many 
benefits from their training, both mentally and physically. Tae 
Kwon Do originated in Korea over 2000 years ago. "Tae" means to 
kick or smash with the toot: "Kwon" means to strike with the hand 
or tist: 'Wo" means the >kill> ot blocking, dodging, toot sweeps, and 
joint locks to form a very effective style ot selt-detense. Throughout 
any given semester, the students train tor different kinds ot events 
Mich as tournaments, demonstrations, and the end-ot-semester belt 
test. Today, the club is taught by Clark Macon and Justin Burgess. 
The Clemson Tae Kwon Do club provides a great place for students 
to not only exercise, but introduces them to friends that are kept 
tor life. 



THROUGH THE AIR 
True skill is being able to deliver 
a power kick mid-air. 
Photo courtesy of Julien Boyon 



A STRONG HOLD 
Instructor, Clark Macon, 
demonstrates the correct way to 
grab arms in one ot the moves. 
Photo courtesy of julien Boyon 






Club Sportscar 



175 



TAILGRAB 








One wakehoarder shows off his 








skills by demonstrating a tailgrah. 








Photo courtesy of Wakeboarding Club 


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Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 




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JThredding 



water 



By: Anna Lauren Meeks 
Photography Editor 



Wakeboarding is a wet and wild pasttime for some 
Clemson students. With Lake Hartwell conveniently 
located right on Clemson's campus, many students take 
advantage of having such a club to enjoy. One student, Luke 
Stofan, remarks, "I joined the club because I really love to 
wakeboard and spend time on the water. Also, all of the 
people in the club are cool people and we all push each other 
to do better every time we go out. There is nothing better than 
being out on the water with your friends on a really hot day." 
This club is active in both the spring and fall, allowing students 
to sign up for different time slots beginning at 6:00am and 
ending at sunset. The members have two boats to play with 
but typically bring their own ropes and boards to the water. 
From the bridges crossing Hartwell, wakeboarders can be seen 
jumping wakes from either side of the boat, and sometimes 
doing tricks such as flipping or dragging two boarders at once. 






IT'S TRICiq 

Some do call wakeboarding a teari 

sport. Two members of the team sho\ 

of their teamwork on the watei 

Photo courtesy of Wakeboarding Clu 






Club Wakeboarding 



BATTLING IT OUT 
Two female players fight for the 
hockey ball during practice on 
the intramural field. 
Photo by Joshua Kelly 



Jdick it 




By: Kelsey Lundstrom 

Athletics Editor 



Hockey is certainly not a sport that is normally associated 
with the South. However, Clemson University does 
have a recognized club field hockey team tor both men and 
women. The team is a full member of the National Field 
Hockey League, the governing body tor club field hockey. The 
purpose of their club is to be a tun and competitive team 
where students can play field hockey at a collegiate level. It is 
a student-run club that competes against other teams in the 
Southern Division of the National Field Hockey League. Some 
of these teams included colleges such as Coastal Carolina and 
High Point University. Members of the club team practiced 
on the intramural fields during the tall months until they 
started participating in tournaments. The season included 
.1 combination of tournaments, traveling, and home games. 
Not only did the team participate in athletic events, they also 
participated in a variety of fundraising and philanthropies. 



COIN' FOR THE GOAL 

One of the club field hockey 
players dribbles the ball up the 
field to rake a shot on the goalie. 
Photo by Joshua Kelly 



PLAYING DEFENSE 

Two players go bead to bead on 
the field as they battle it out for 
possession of the ball. 
Photo by Joshua Kelly 



Club Hockey 



U 



177 



CANT TOUCH THIS 

Great skill, speed, and focus are 

showcased during each game of 

the 5v5 intramural basketball 

games-skills essential to win. 

Photo by Andre Friedman 



SHOOT IT! 

Accuracy is key when it comes to 

landing that perfect shot. Here, 

one player makes the shot to win 

the game. 

Photo by Andre Friedman 




Mo^iqg down the 
Oourt 



The 5v5 basketball intramural team consists of five players 
on each team during a game, although one may begin 
with a minimum of four. Both men and women are able 
to join and even compete head-to-head. Being a part of the 
5v5 basketball team was a great way for students to be team 
players, to create friendships that otherwise may not have 
been formed and to improve their skills within the sport while 
just having fun. 

Many of the members also competed on co-rec teams, and 
intramural basketball was a great way for students and faculty 
to socialize and get some exercise as well. The 5v5 intramural 
basketball team was given breaks during halftimes in order 
to grab some water and tweak their game plans. It is popular 
among many of the campus fraternities, some even showcasing 
creative and outlandish names, which becomes a way to 
illustrate just how much fun the intramural sport truly is. 



178 



A 



TRUE TEAMWORK! 

Players have to work together tc 

earn a win for their team 

Photo by Andre Friedman 



Intramural 5 vs 5 Basketball 



IN THE AIR 

Players show that Clemson 

students can indeed jump if the 

game is on the line. 

Photo fry Fatema Hakimji 





Nottiirx) but 




By: Olivia Elswick 

]nnior Staff 



Clemson University hosts a variety of intramural sports 
each season for students to participate in. 3v3 basketball 
is a co-ed intramural sport played between two teams of two 
or three players. Each tall, students compose their own teams 
for competition, and anyone and everyone is allowed to 
participate. It differs from other variations of the game it is 
played on only halt the court. Games are played to twenty- 
one in a bc>t ot three series. 3v3 basketball allows students 
to play socially while building on inmo\ sportsmanship and 
teamwork. The competitive games are complete with cheering 
fans and spectators who come out to watch in Fike Recreation 
('enter. Several Greek fraternities have teams, as well as other 
campus organizations. Some club sports, such as club tennis, 
use intramural basketball for footwork and reflex training. No 
matter your skill level or expertise, intramural 3v3 basketball 
is bound to leave players wanting to play more. 



EVES ON THE PRIZE 

It the players want to win, they 

have to remain focused and keep 

their opponents at hay. 

Photo by Fatema Hakimji 




BLOCKAGE 
Keeping the other team from 
scoring is essential it one wants 
to earn a win. 

Photo r>\ Fatema Hakimji 



Intramural 3 vs 3 Basketball 



L 



179 



PRACTICE MAKES 

PERFECT 

These two players try to grab 

the frisbee to give their team the 

advantage. 

Photo by Jesse Von Fange 



ALL IN 

One Clemson student catches 

the frisbee for her team during 

practice. 

Photo r>\ Jesse Von Fange 




Letting off 
vJTtea 



pp| By:AlixDrye 

Junior Staff 



Clemson has always been big on athletics, but not everyone 
can run down the hill beside Dabo Swinney in Death 
Valley or score the winning basket in Littlejohn. Although 
our school is full of avid fans that are more than willing to 
cheer our teams to victory, for some, being on the sidelines 
isn't enough. Intramural sports are offered at Clemson for 
students that want to participate in sports as more of a hobby 
than a career. One of the most popular intramural sports that 
Clemson offers is intramural ultimate frisbee. 

Intramural ultimate frisbee involves men and women only 
teams, as well as co-rec teams. Single gender teams have seven 
players while co-rec teams are composed of eight. There are 
two goals at either end of the field and just like with any other 
sport, there are defensive and offensive players. The players 
may have to dive, jump, or slide in order to catch some of the 
throws, making it a very exciting alternative to varsity sports. 





DEFENDING THE 

OPPONENT 

A defender tries to stop the othe- 

team from making a catch 

Photo by Jesse Von Fangi 



Intramural Ultimate Frisbee 



BOYS BEING BOYS 
Two of the men's flag footba 
reams played each other under 
rhe lights on the intramural field. 
Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 




Grab that 
/"lag 



By: Kelsey Lundstrom 

Junior Staff 



Flag football is rhe ideal intramural sport for anyone who 
loves the game of football. Both males and females are 
able to make teams with their friends or play together on a 
co-ed team. Therefore, it you like the sport there is no reason 
not to get involved. Students themselves referee the games 
hut they do take it seriously. Games take place once a week 
and teams face each other from whichever Bracket they are 
in. Students like to come up with creative team names which 
keeps things interesting and humorous. 

At the Beginning of each game, the team captains talk to the 
referees about the rules and remind everyone to have tun. 
Each team is a different color to create unison and separate 
them from their opposing team. No matter which side you 
are on, there is always ^o<>k\ sportsmanship Between all. 
Intramural sports are a tun way for students to stay athletic 
while rememhering to not take the games too seriously. 




Intramural Flag Football 



A BALANCING ACT 

Careful coordination is needed if 

one is to play well, otherwise it is 

hard to avoid awkward positions. 

Photo fry Courtney Jones 

STAMINA 

Indoor soccer can be tricky and 

taxing at times, which is why you 

need true stamina to succeed. 

Photo b} Courtney Jones 



Kickin '/it to 




IV~\ By: Grace Bache-Wiig 
! : : Junior Staff 




Intramural indoor soccer is like normal soccer on steroids. 
It is a game in which the ball and the feet of the players 
never stop moving. The rules of the game are fairly similar 
to normal soccer: 5 players on the floor from each team, the 
goalies are the only players who can use their hands and tie 
games end in a shoot-out. But, there is one minor difference: 
in indoor soccer, there is no off-sides. The players can receive 
the ball from anywhere on the field. This makes the rate 
of game play much faster. There are 5 different leagues of 
intramural indoor soccer, two coed leagues, two men's leagues 
and one women's league. Teams in these leagues range from 
fraternities and sororities to ranciomly organized groups of 
friends. Each team can have up to 15 players and with over 
seventy teams, there is a spot for everyone in intramural 
indoor soccer. With names like Swift like Taylor, Bi-polar 
Bears, and Scorpion Commando Squad, these teams came 
not only to play but also to have fun. 




POWER BLOCK 

This soccer player knows how 
to block the opponent. He has 
had his eye on the intramural 
championship for a while. 
Photo by Courtney Jones 



Intramural Soccer 



EYES ON THE PRIZE 
\ player waits for the ball to 
come her way and prepares to 
volley tor her team. 
Photo by Fatema Hakimji 




Playipg in the 
JSand 



By: Keelia Faber 
Athletics Editor 



Students who participate in Clemson's intramural sports 
have the chance to show off their skills without the 
commitment to a varsity level sport. One of Clemson's tall 
2011 intramural sports was sand volleyball. There were 64 
teams across five divisions competing in weekly matches. 
These divisions were made up of two co-ed leagues, two men's 
leagues and one women's league. 

One tun part of intramural sports is that the players get to be 
very creative with their team names, with Tiger Spike, Shake 
and Bake, and Hot Shots as some examples. Throughout the 
semester, teams hoped to move up in the bracket and become 
league champions. 

Another meat part of intramural sports is that anyone can 
start a team. Students don't have to be particularly athletic in 
order to play, so many consider this as a great way tor friends 
to get together and have some tun during the school week. 



GETTING ASSISTANCE 
The volleyball is hit to a 
teammate for an assist 
Photo In Fatema Hakimji 




OVER THE NET 

A player is prepared tor the bal 
to come her way. 
Photo r>)> Fatema Hakimji 



Intramural Sand Volleyball 



L 



183 



HUDDLE UP 

The team gathers tor a huddle 

before the start of another hig 

game. 

Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 



CALL IT 

A team member calls out 

possession of the next bump. 

Photo h^ Anna Lauren Meeks 




Setting up for a 
V ictory 



By: Kellie Hawkins 
Junior Staff 



One of the best ways for students to get involved at 
Clemson is to participate in intramural sports. One 
that popular sport is intramural volleyball. The teams consist 
of all males, all females, or a combination of the two, known as 
co-rec. The sport is played in the fall, with the championships 
taking place at the end of October. 

Each team has six players, with the number oi men and 
women distributed evenly on the co-rec teams. In order to 
win a match, the teams play to see who can win the best two 
out of three games. 

The teams have a great time bonding with each other. Part 
of the bonding experience involves creating a team name, 
such as "Spike the Punch" or "Sets on the Beach," as well as 
designing unique jerseys in which they paint their numbers 
on the back. Intramural volleyball is a great way for students 
to let loose and have fun. 




*.> ; £>--,-. ^.V^B*?*^ 



SUN NT SANE 

Members of a team break for 

photo in the midst of a practice 

on the sand courts 

Photo by ]esse Von Fang 



Intramural Volleyball 



I'VE GOT IT! 

Two players work well together in 

order to ensure that the ball goes 

over the net. 

Photo by Anna Lauren Meeks 











1 1 


SPIKE IT 










A spike is a difficult technique 






Ik 




to master, but once you do it can 








change the game. 

Photo r>\ Anna Lauren Meeks 






* M 




HERE IT COMES 

When the ball is about to come 
flying down everyone is sure to 




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^^^^^^^^H ^^^ * 


get out of the way. 
Photo by Jesse Von Fange 




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Intramural Volleyball 



- 



185 



ACE 

A Clemson student prepares to 

serve the hall to his opponent. 

Photo {ry Courtney Jones 



PRACTICE MAKES 

PERFECT 

A group of Clemson students 

gather to practice playing ping 

pong together and relieve stress. 

Photo by Courtney Jones 




PinchPonq 
Pros 



By: Jodi Williams 
Junior Staff 



Competitive table tennis is not an especially well known 
intramural sport at Clemson, however most people 
don't realize that table tennis was actually created in England 
in the 1880s. Predominantly popular in Asia and Europe, 
table tennis has recently become more frequently played in 
the United States as well, and has been an Olympic sport 
in the summer games since 1988. All Clemson students are 
welcome to sign up for the sport in the fall, and play proceeds 
like any other intramural. Matches are the best of five games, 
each game goes to eleven points and the winner must win by 
two. After every two points the players must switch servers 
until the game is over. The game can be played in singles or 
doubles. So far, the U.S. has never had an athlete medal in the 
Olympics or be inducted into the International Table Tennis 
Federation Hall of Fame. So who knows, start playing today, 
and you could be the first! 





STUDY BREAK 

Graduate student Peng Xie takes some 

time away from his studies to participate 

in a friendly game of ping pong. 

Photo by Courtney Jones 



Intramural Toble Tennis 



WEET VICTORY 

Members celebrate their 
ictory in Hilton Head with 
ome group bonding time. 
5 hoto r>\ Olnia Elsuick 




TheSwing of 
/ yhings 



By: Olivia Elswick 
Junior Staff 



Clemson club tennis had a great year on and off the court. 
The team traveled to Charleston, SC in the fall, where they 
took on the College of Charleston and the University of South 
Carolina. Clemson's B Team placed second against the eight 
other participating teams. The team also aced their competition 
at the regional competition in Hilton Head Island, SC, where 
they competed against nearly forty other teams from around the 
nation. Clemson's placement gave the team an automatic bid to 
the sectional tournament at Auburn University in March. 

Not only did the team play other schools, butthey hosted a variety 
of inter-club tournaments. These events gave members a unique 
chance to play competitively against their teammates. The club 
met Monday through Thursday for practice, which included 
drills and games. Friday afternoons were an opportunity tor 
members to improve footwork, and the members would meet 
up to play basketball or soccer. 



EAMILYTREE 

Ben Wood joins brother and 
sister mixed-doubles team Maddie 
and Nathan Wood, to form the 
team's so called "triplets." 
Photo r>\' Olivia Elswick 



A TRUE TEAM 
Allie Wasilko and Chase Lyles 
cheer on the team at Nationals. 
Photo r>\ Olnia Elsuick 



Intramural Racquetball 



- 



187 




bioengineering 



A 



ddition B ^ eiiie "» k - 

Junior Staff 



On the week of December 5, 2011, Clemson 
University opened up a new bioengineering lab 
on the Patewood campus at Greenville Hospital 
System University Medical Center. This new 
development has allowed over 100 faculty, staff 
and students to conduct research in order to make 
improvements in health care. 

One main project that is currently being worked 
on involves studying joint replacements that have 
already been used and taken out of patients. 
This research will help scientists discover ways to 
improve the longevity of joint replacements so 
that patients will not have to have them replaced 
as often. The university is very excited to have this 
new laboratory in Greenville that will improve 
different areas of the health care industry. 



new building on the 




ock 



By: Matthew Bickford 
junior Staff 




ft* 



CAFLS kids rejoice! In the parking lot behind the Poole 
Agriculture Center, the new Life Science Building is slowly taking 
shape. Following a construction delay that postponed all 95,000 
square feet, the new building is set to open its doors next spring. 
While creating local jobs, the project also promises to enrich the 
education of all majors. Packed to the brim with labs and offices, 
the new complex will soon be broadening the research horizons 
of undergrads and graduates alike. The building will connect to 
its older counterpart, the P&A building, through a three-story 
walkway. 

"The new Life Science Building will provide much needed 
research labs and teaching labs to enhance the student 
experiences for all majors, and especially for majors in biological 
sciences, pre-med and pre-vet, which are growing in student 
demand," according to the CAFLS newsletter. 



Clemson News 



success at the 



Renter 



By: Matthew Bickford 
Junior Staff 



Thanks to the class of 1956, there is a new center for success! The 
new Academic Success Center provides classrooms and extra space 
for tutoring, workshops, and SI sessions. The Academic Success 
Center was formerly housed in the Cooper Library, with the base 
of operations being small cubicles and desks. Not anymore! On 
April 12, 2012 the center was officially dedicated and opened tor 
student use. The enormous facility provides new study space Kir 
students who find the library a little to crowded or possibly a little 
too quiet. The building will also allow SI leaders (who run tutoring 
programs for students in various classes) to have designated place 
to hold their review sessions. Overall it is an excellent investment 
in the education of Clemson students, tor what better way is there 
to enrich education than by providing a buiding specifically tor 
active learning? 



innovative 

/p nHprQ By: Amber Day 
//^ ^ ^ ^ ' ° Copy Editor 

During the 2011-2012 school year, Clemson began 
the search for a new Vice Provost and Dean of the 
Graduate School. According to the announcement 
tor the search, "The University seeks an innovative 
and dynamic leader with administrative experience 
in graduate education, strong interpersonal skills, 
a strong research and reaching background, and 
an ability to direct planned growth in graduate 
education." The three finalists tor the position came 
to campus during January of this year, and open 
forums were held in which students, faculty, and 
staff could meet and hear from each prospective 
candidate. To date, the search committee has not 
yet made a selection tor the new position. However, 
with such promising candidates, Clemson's graduate 
school is sure to be in good hands no matter who 
the chosen person may be. 




Clemson News I I 



determined 




JTpirits 



By: Amber Day 
Copy Editor 



In 2010, Clemson University launched its Will to Lead campaign, 
which set a goal of raising $600 million to support students and 
faculty by July 2012. So tar, funds from the campaign total $575 
million and have been used to create 305 scholarships/fellowships 
tor students, as well as endowed chair and professorship positions 
for 95 members of the Clemson faculty. This past year, Clemson 
administrators and trustees made big plans for other parts of the 
donations raised so far, including a $12 3.5 million plan for a student 
housing and activity "hub" to be built on the east side of campus. 
The Board of Trustees hopes to begin construction on this new set 
of buildings, which will include housing for upperclassmen and 
graduate students as well as students who participate in the Bridge 
to Clemson transfer program, in 2013 with a completion date of 
2015. Several events are held throughout the year to recognize the 
generous donors who support the students, faculty, and the future 
of this beloved University. 




spreading the 



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By: Alec Gibson 
Editor-in-Chief 



On April 16th, 2012 Clemson University announced that it will launch a new magazine 
designed to give thousands of readers a look behind the scenes of a major research 
university 7 . The magazine, titled glimpse, not only will cover scientific research, but 
scholarship and creative achievement campuswide, according to Gerald Sonnenfeld, vice 
president for research. "We want to share Clemson's culture of discovery with people 
everywhere, to give them a glimpse of what we do," Sonnenfeld said. The magazine, which 
will be printed twice a year, also appears online in a format accessible by computer or other 
digital devices. The first issue's cover story, "Of Seeds and the River," describes the human 
and technical hurdles of an ambitious project that will use hundreds of high-tech buoys to 
monitor the health of the Savannah River ecosystem. "With this magazine, Clemson will 
assert itself nationally as a research university creating knowledge the public can use," said 
Neil Caudle, the magazine's editor. Caudle said that the demise of science journalism in 
the independent media has opened new opportunities for institutions such as Clemson 
to fill the void. "Our goal is help readers share in the thrill of discovery," Caudle said. 
Sonnenfeld said that public universities like Clemson have a responsibility to ensure that 
information about valuable discoveries go out to meet the public. 



190 ■ I Clemson N. 



emson iNews 



a year for 
protection 



By: Angela Nixon 
Media Relations 



The Clemson University Police Department has been named an Agency of the Year by 
the South Carolina Department of Public Safety. The public safety department recognizes 
officers and agencies tor their work to uphold DUI laws and their efforts to remove 
impaired drivers from South Carolina roads. The university department was named the 
Agency of the Year in its size category: 26 to 50 officers. The department made 66 arrests 
relating to DUI violations in 201 1, a 53.4 percent increase from the previous year. 

The police department otters advanced training to any officer who wants to participate in 
programs related to DUI case preparation and prosecution. It also participates in public 
education programs about the impaired driving and DUI, as well as presenting Alive at 
25 programs. "We are honored to receive this recognition," Chief of Police Johnson Link 
said. "We have worked hard in this area of enforcement and to be recognized tor our 
efforts is very rewarding. The men and women of CUPD are to be congratulated tor their 
efforts." The protection provided by CUPD allows students to feel sate at all times while 
on campus and ensures that security and the law will be enforced tor everyone at Clemson 
University. 



reaching for the 

fpj rC By: Allison Kenn; 
1 ^ ' ° Student Life Edi 



S 



namer 
tor 



In line with the rest of the world's interest with space exploration 
in the 1960's Clemson furnished Kinard Laboratory with the 
university's first planetarium in 1961. Since its installation the 
technology- that was used to construct and run the facility had 
become outdated and needed to be revamped to keep up with the 
rapid growth in projection and viewing quality. So in January o\ 
2012 the planetarium staff was excited to reopen their doors to the 
student body, faculty, and public with state-of-the-art equipment. 

The new Digistar 4 projection system gave operators the ease 
of using its advanced computer program with "point-and-click" 
interfaces. With a user friendly setup like this students were 
even given the opportunity to lead several of the presentations 
tor visitors. All of the renovations were huge improvements to 
an already exciting attraction and served to enhance observer 
experience. 





J 



Clemson Nev 



191 




picking up the 



P 



I ^^ /"* £i C By: Katie Simmons 



Friday, July 22, 201 1 marked a day of tragedy for inhabitants 
of Norway and their families. A car bomb detonated in the 
nation's capital, Oslo, killing eight people and wounding 
15 others. Anders Behring Breivik, the man accused of the 
bombing, then boarded a ferry to Utoya, a small island a 
short distance away where a Labor Party youth camp was 
being held. Dressed as a policeman, Breivik lured the young 
campers in and opened fire, killing over 68 people. That 
weekend, more than 100,000 people gathered for a flower 
vigil in Oslo to remember the victims and to lend support. 




a move towards 



^quality 



By: Alec Gibson 
Editor-in-Chief 



Supporters of same-sex marraige had much to celebrate this year, 
as several states passed legislation approving the issue of marriage 
licenses to same-sex couples. On February 13, 2012 Washington 
signed into law legislation providing marriage equality to all 
individuals this year, meaning seven states, in addition to the District 
of Columbia now issue marriage licenses to both homosexual and 
heterosexual couples (Connecticut, Iowa, Massachusetts, New 
Hampshire, New York, Vermont, and Washington). With a new 
Gallup poll showing that a majority of Americans approve of same- 
sex marriage, it seems like only a matter of time before marriage 
equality is achieved on a national level. 




death of a 
> 2^ictator 



By: Amber Day 

Copy Editor 



On Dec. 11, 2011, North Korean government officials announced that th< 
dictator of their country, Kim Jong-il, had died two days earlier of a hear 
attack. For a country already in tumult, this death send shockwaves througr 
the nation, as well as the rest of the world. Members of North Korea's larges 
political party, the Worker's Party, announced that Jong-il's successor would 
be his youngest son, Kim Jong-un. In the months since Jong-il's death, botl 
American and Asian government officials have anxiously watched Nortt 
Korea move closer and closer toward becoming a nuclear weaponized state 
which could have major implications for the entire world. 



■ I World News 




stop Joseph 



By: Carson Kohler 
junior Staff 



Not many people knew who Joseph Kony was until the 
film, Kony 2012, spread vi rally within Jays of its release on 
March 5, 2012. By March 30, the film had over 86 million 
views on YouTuhe. The film promotes a movement to stop 
Joseph Kony, an International Criminal Court fugitive who 
practices brutal guerilla warfare in northern Uganda, the 
Democratic Republic of the Congo, and South Sudan in 
order to maintain his power. Jason Russell, the director or 
the film, aims to have Kony arrested by December 2012, the 
time when the campaign expires. 




the war is 



o 



X/f^f By: Alec Gibson 



Editor-in-Chief 



On December 15, 2011 President Barack Obama accomplished 
another goal set during his campaign: to officially end the war in Iraq. A 
military ceremony formally ended the war, while the announcement 
to end the war was made on October 21. 500 American troops left 
Iraq during the night and under strict secrecy, and most were able 
to arrive home tor New Years Eve. However, approximately 4,000 
troops still remain in Kuwait and will be stationed there until May 
31, 2012. The United States Embassy will continue to operate in 
Iraq, and President Obama has outlined a broad agenda for post-war 
operations in Iraq (including peaceful negotiations with the Prime 
Minister of Iraq, Nouri al-Maliki). 




a change of 



P 



ower 



By: Alec Gibson 
Editor-in-Chief 



On October 20, 2011 it was announced that the Lybian dictator Moammar 
Gadhafi was killed by rebel fighters after many months of violence. Gadhafi 
had been the President of Lybia since 1979 and ruled the nation with an 
iron fist through a totalitarian and oppresive (ovent violent) government. 
His regime refused. to back down and challenged the Lybian rebels at every 
turn, often utilizing its military strength in an attempt to wipe out the rebels. 
However, with the aid of NATO forces (led by the British, French, and 
American militaries) the rebels were able to finally overthrow the government. 
Gadhafi was found in a drain pipe and was quickly executed by rebel forces. 



World News 



L 



193 




"happy hunger 




ames... 



By: Katie Simmons 

Layout Editor 



...and may the odds he ever in your favor." The odds were certainly in the favor of the 
biggest blockbuster of the year: The Hunger Games. Earning over $200 million in box 
office sales, this movie certainly demonstrated its popularity among individuals of all 
ages. The Hunger Games was transformed from a highly popular novel into a world-wide 
phenomenon, earning it the record of being the third all time best opening weekend and 
best opening weekend ever for a non sequel. The plot is set in a futuristic, totalitarian 
world in which the 12 districts of the country Panem are forced every year to each send 
two tributes to participate in a fight do the death from which only one can survive. The 
heroine in this story is a 16-year-old Katniss Everdeen, who volunteers as a tribute so save 
her younger sister. People all over the world lined the streets outside of movie theaters in 
anticipation of the film, making people recall the events surrounding the Harry Potter 
and Twilight films. Indeed, The Hunger Games made its mark the world this year, and 
there is no doubt that the sequals to the novel will also be made into movies. Whether 
these movies are as successful as The Hunger Games has yet to be seen, but judging by the 
enthusiasm with which people have read the novels and flocked to theaters, it is safe to 
assume they will be huge hits. 



new to 




eievision 



By: Alec Gibson 
Editor-in-Chief 



2011 and 2012 marked a series of renovations for the big four 
television networks, namely NBC, CBS, ABC, and FOX. With 
ratings down and more viewers turning to the internet to satisfy their 
need for visual and auditory stimulation, the networks decided it 
was time to clean house and bring in a new batch of shows. Enter 
programs like Smash, a show about the trials and tribulations of 
putting together a successful Broadway performance, Awake, a 
drama about a man who is living two separate lives and cannot 
figure out which one is a dream and which one is reality, Touch, a 
show about a young boy who has a gift for working with numbers 
and his father who figures out the meaning of that gift, and Don't 
Trust the B— in Apartment 23, a comedy that has censors on the 
edges of their seats with its crass yet witty humor. With so many 
new shows, viewers have a lot to choose from, the only question is 
whether or not the money put into these shows will translate into 
high ratings. 



194 



Jl 




Entertainment News 




blast from the 



P 



f~] C + By: Alec Gibson 



Editor-in-Chief 



This year the winner tor the Best Picture Academy Award did not go to an 
action tilm with copious amounts ot explosions and fighting, nor did it 
go to a dramatic film in which lovers are torn appart and reunited in the 
end. Instead, the winner was The Artist, a romantic comedy drama that was 
devoid not only or color but also sound. The film, written and directed by 
Michel Hazanavicius and staring Jean Dujardin and Berenice Bejo, takes 
place in Hollywood during the early 1900s as two actors fall in kwe during 
the decline ot the silent film. This movie is a reminder of "Old Hollywood" 
and truly stood out amongst the other movies made this year. A well deserved 
Oscar made this movie a treasure in a world ot "New Hollywood." 



a world in three 
> 2^imensions 



By: Alec Gibson 
Editor-in-Chief 



The '70s are coming back in a hi<_: way, thi^ time with 3D movies. The latest craze 
has Americans flocking to theater-- to see movies, both new and old, in a unique 
light. A majority of new tiling now haw both a 2D and a 3D version, with many 
older films being re-released with "eye-popping" new twist. The 1997 tilm Titanic 
had the 3D touch added to it and opened once again on April 2, 2012. Because 
of a growing audience and a shortening of attention spans, Hollywood needed a 
way to get people back into the reclining seats of the movie theater rather than at 
home on their computers. Judging by the popularity o\ the 3D and IMAX films, 
it would seem that the plan i> working quire well. 





rollina in the 







By: Amber Day 
Copy Editor 



"First of all, 1 just want to say: Mum, your girl did good!" Adele was 
sure to thank her mom, among many others, during her acceptance 
speech at the 54th Annual Grammy Awards, the culmination 
of her 2012 achievements. The 23-year old British crooner took 
home six Grammys, including Album ot the Year tor her top- 
selling album 21. Her soulful love songs have charmed Americans 
and Brits alike, and she attributes her attinity tor poetic lyrics to 
inspiration trom singers like Jill Scott and Karen Dalton. Adele 
is undoubtedly just beginning a long career of success, and she is 
admired by the masses tor her role as a strong female entertainer. 

1- 

Entertainment News | M I 



195 




getting Olympic 



^ 



eady 



By: Alec Gibson 
Editor-in-Chief 



Preparations have been underway for quite some time in London, 
England. There has been a great deal of construction and hard 
labor, not to mention publicity, all to get the city ready to host 
the 2012 summer Olympics. One of the biggest milestones 
reached was the completion of the Olympic stadium, as well 
as the athletic facilities including the aquatic center, basketball 
stadium, and Velodrome. Contracts totalling approximately 5 
billion pounds have been given out to over 1,500 businesses in 
the United Kingdom, which is doing wonders for the economy. 
In addition, athletes from all over the world have been training 
hard in order to get themselves "gold medal worthy." Soon the 
worlds greatest athletes will come to London and show the world 
exactly what they can do. 



end of an 



ra 




By: Alec Gibson 
Editor-in-Chief 



2012 was marked by the news that cyclist Lance 
Armstrong would be retire at age 39. Armstrong 
skyrocketed to popularity after beating life- 
threatening testicular cancer and going on to win 
a record seven Tour de France titles. After several 
dissapointing finishes in recent races, Armstrong 
decided that it was time to quit the profession 
for good and focus on his family life. There is 
no doubt that Armstrong has had an enormous 
impact on the sport and on society in general. Not 
only has he served as an inspiration for countless 
cyclists throughout the world but he has also 
raised an enormous amount of money for cancer 
research, something that is very near and dear to 
his heart. Recently, Armstrong began battling 
against accusations that he used performance- 
enhancing drugs. Armstrongs numerous tests have 
always come up clean and he continues to deny 
any use of such drugs. 



Sports News 



"who dot" bonus 



f 



^j [ By: Allison Kennamer 
Student Life Editor 



In 2010 it was claimed that the New Orleans Saints 
football team had been rewarding its players with 
"bonues" if they injured members of the opposing 
team. But it was not until the following year that 
an investigation into this accusation against the 
program was launched. Investigators found that 
indeed some of the players and even former defensive 
coordinator, Gregg Williams, had been paying into 
a fund that paid members of the Saints team who 
delibrately injured the other team's players. These 
'performance bonuses' were in clear violation of the 
NFL's consitution that fobids the paying of non- 
contracted bonuses. It was also confirmed that there 
had been an attempt made to cover up the scandal 
by then head coach Sean Payton. 



the Penn State 

JC* C*\ O rH (^\ I Q B Y : Kelsey Lundstrom 
^ — ^ — ^ ■ I ^J ^J I O Athletics Editor 

In November of 2011, scandal broke out as Jerry Sandusky's 
shocking past was finally publicly exposed. 67-year-old Sandusky 
was a former Penn State assistant football coach with close ties 
to the legendary, longtime Penn State head coach, Joe Paterno. 
Sandusky was charged with sexually abusing eight boys over a 15 
year time period. Several grown men have spoken out since the 
scandal claiming that they too were victims of sexual abuse by 
Sandusky. These men stated that they were victimized right on 
Penn State's football facilities, an area where Sandusky once had 
easy access to. Joe Paterno, although not directly involved in the 
sexual abuse, was chastised for not doing enough to try and stop 
the suspected abuse over the years. Not only was Paterno accused 
of having a role in the scandal, but the Penn State President, 
Graham Spanier, was also blamed for his passive role in the 
situation when he could have stopped what was going on but he 
instead turned his head. 





Sports News ■■ 197 



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Senior Portraits 



■1203 



Seniors 



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Hfl 



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Senior Portraits 



1207 



Seniors 



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208 



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Senior Portraits 



wA 



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Walter Harper Marion, SC 

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Richard James Harvey Isle Of Palms, SC 

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Sarah Elizabeth Henderson Mount Pleasant, SC 

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Thomas Butler Herlong Simpsonville, SC 

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Louis Wayne Hill Timmonsville, SC 

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Marketing 
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Marketing 






Senior Portraits 



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211 



Seniors 



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Psychology 

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Nursing 

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Nursing 



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Senior Portraits 





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Psychology 

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Mechanical Engineering 

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Thomas Mcleod Jones Marion, SC 

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William Douglas Jones Niceville, FL 

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Whitney Grace Jordan Summerville, SC 

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Jessica Anne Justice Springfield, SC 

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Elizabeth Willa Kahney Finksburg, MD 

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Sophie Lena Karnas Honeoye Falls, NY 

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Melissa Dawn Karraker Anderson, SC 

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Anne Elizabeth Kelly Spartanburg, SC 

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Tabitha Blu-Lynn Kelly Belton, SC 

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Ashley Faire Kennedy Greenville, SC 

Special Education 

Carlisle Evans Kennedy Leesville, SC 

Finance / Accounting 

Dantzler Antley Kennerly Lilburn, GA 

Forest Resource Management 



Senior Portraits 



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213 



Seniors 



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Management Supply Chain Emphasis 

Haley Elizabeth Kernell Travelers Rest, SC 

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Ryan Nicole King Elgin, SC 

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Stephanie Elizabeth King Greer, SC 

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Thomas Edward Kizer Moncks Corner, SC 

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Thomas Autrey Koch Chatham, NJ 

Accounting 

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Economics 

Scott Richard Kwarsick Greenwood, SC 

Chemical Engineering 

Paul Ryan Lagarenne Glen Gardner, NJ 

Biological Sciences 

Lindsey Christine Lambrakos Folly Beach, SC 

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Jennifer Lynn Lance Campobello, SC 

Marketing 

Amber Rose Landrum Easley, SC 

Management 

Andrew Michael Lane Cary, IL 

Finance 
Suzanna Jean Langworthy Flower Mound, TX 

Bioengineering 

Monica Renee Laux Springfield, VA 

Secondary Education English 

Garrett Alexander Lay Columbia, SC 

Communication Studies 




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Senior Portraits 




Peter Christner Leahy Simpsonville, SC 

History 

Whitney Carolyn Leamy Wilmington, DE 

Elementary Education 

Jeffrey Michael Lear Rockwell, NC 

Civil Engineering 

Jordan Allison Lee Charlotte, NC 

Marketing 

Jennifer Anne Leggette Belmont, NC 

Computer Information Systems 

Stefano Leghissa Central, SC 

Economics 

Anna Jordan Lindsey Spartanburg, SC 

Marketing 

Margaret Rose Livingston Irmo, SC 

Microbiology /Biomedicine 

Richard Lewis Livingston Orangeburg, SC 

Biological Sciences 

Melissa Lo Bue Wayne, NJ 

Nursing 

Jocelyn Kayse Long Greenville, SC 

Secondary Education 

Taylor Allmond Long Wilmington, DE 

Marketing 

Jayme Nicole Looper ... West Columbia, SC 

Bioengineering 

Winston Levi Lord Atlanta, GA 

Audio Technology / Performing Arts 
Sarah Elizabeth Louderback Hagerstown, MD 

Marketing 

Raymond Jon Loveland Mount Pleasant, SC 

Financial Management 



Stephanie Michelle Lowell .. Ellicott City, MD 

Psychology 

Rice Jensen Lund Anderson, SC 

Civil Engineering 

Kelsey Ruth Lundstrom Turnersville, NJ 

English 

Brittany Nicole Lusk Anderson, SC 

Construction Science & Management 

Michelle Christine Lyles Lexington, SC 

Graphic Communications 

Amanda Keri Lyons-Archambault 

North Charleston, SC 
Philosophy 

Julia Walker Mack Mount Pleasant, SC 

Animal & Vererinary Sciences 

Richard George Mack Davidson, NC 

Mechanical Engineering 



Senior Portraits 



im 



215 



Seniors 



Alexander James Mackenzie Dunwoody, GA 

Marketing 

Tim Macko Greer, SC 

Supply Chain Management 

Evan Dane Maddox Lexington, KY 

Civil Engineering 

Jarrett Evan Maffett Saluda, SC 

Sociology 

Lauren Mckenzie Maggs Roswell, GA 

Marketing 

Taylor Magusiak Griffin, GA 

Graphic Communications 

Jonathan Reid Maney Lexington, SC 

Management 

Charnise Nicole Mangle Simpsonville, SC 

Secondary Education History 

Kimberly Elaine Manos Gaston, SC 

Biological Sciences 

Michael Sean Mansmann Anderson, SC 

Business Management 

Kori Elizabeth Manson Aiken, SC 

Psychology 

Michelle Ann Markham Summerville, SC 

Early Childhood Education 

Bryce David Martin Greer, SC 

Civil Engineering 

Corbin Michael Martin Greer, SC 

Civil Engineering 

Daniel Paul Martin Asheville, NC 

Wildlife And Fisheries Biology 

Tyler James Martin Seneca, SC 

Industrial Engineering 

Sean Michael Marusich Simpsonville, SC 

Electrical Engineering 

Benjamin Jeremy Ryan Masters... Easley, SC 

Computer Science 

Ryan Stephen Mattfeld Simpsonville, SC 

Electrical Engineering 

Kathryn Layne Mauldin Rock Hill, SC 

Production Studies In The Performing Arts 

Barbara Jillyn Mayer Pomaria. SC 

Psychology 

Olivia Joan Mays Fair Play, SC 

Nursing 

Lauren Glenn McCarter Hopkins, SC 

Sport Management 

Nicole Renee McCaskill Mc Bee, SC 

Wildlife & Fisheries Biology 




216 



A 



Senior Portraits 




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Sara McCutchen Leesville, SC 

Graphic Communication 
Andrew Watson McDowell Winston Salem, NC 

Political Science 
Courtney Elizabeth McElveen. Beaufort, SC 

Management 

Sara Elizabeth McGee Greenwood, SC 

Comm Studies 

Rachel Christine McGonigal . Great Falls, VA 

Spanish 

Christopher Lee McKee Florence, SC 

Biological Sciences 

David Stewart McKeeman Celebration, FL 

Construction Science And Management 

Berkeley Ann McKeown Columbia, SC 

Financial Management 

Stahler McKinney Raleigh, NC 

Business Management 

Stacy Noelle McKinnis Tobaccoville, NC 

Animal & Veterinary Sciences 
Laura Meredith McLachlan Orangeburg, SC 

Nursing 
Christin Elizabeth McMasters Winston Salem, NC 

Political Science 

Leah Elise McMillion Hopkins, SC 

Health Science 

Olivia Jayne McNeil Aiken, SC 

Mathematics Teaching 

Kelley Elizabeth McQueeney Gaston, SC 

Biochemistry 

Molly Joan McWhirter Columbia, SC 

Parks, Recreation. Tourism Management - 
Therapeutic Recreation 

Spencer Paul Mead Bonita Springs, FL 

Electrical Engineering 

Stefan Michael Meagher Gainesville, GA 

Construction Science And Management 

Gabriella Lizette Medina San Antonio, TX 

Graphic Communications 

Anna Lauren Meeks Myrtle Beach, SC 

Language And International Trade 

Bryan Joseph Menghini Piedmont, SC 

Financial Management 

Carlie Erwin Metzger Columbia, SC 

Civil Engineering 

Melissa Moore Meyer Chesterfield, MO 

Health Science 

Steffanie Leigh Meyer Chicopee, MA 

Biological Sciences Toxicology Emphasis 



Senior Portraits 



tm 



217 






Seniors 



Nathan Thomas Milam Greenville, SC 

Performing Arts 

Morgan Osborne Milano Cincinnati, OH 

Marketing 

Harry Ward Miley Columbia, SC 

Accounting 

Justin Keith Miller Clemson, SC 

Electrical Engineering 

Melanie Joy Miller Aiken, SC 

Economics 

Sarah Davis Miller Greenville, SC 

Prtm-Tr 
Kendall Jamaal Millhouse... Summerville, SC 

Sociology 

Elizabeth Barrett Mills Duluth, GA 

History 

Sarah Theresa Milz Clemson, SC 

Nursing 

Jamie Nicole Minick Columbia, SC 

Biological Sciences 

Morgann Jhanee Mitchell Peachtree City, GA 

Communication Studies 

Wesley Warton Mitchell Taylors, SC 

Psychology 

Julie Anne Mobley Clemson, SC 

Spanish 

Andrew Robert Moore Clemson, SC 

Parks, Recreation, Tourism Management 

Caitlynn Ella Moore Simpsonville, SC 

English-Wps 

Mary Elizabeth Moravec Simpsonville, SC 

Financial Management 

Brian Alexander Morris Greenville, SC 

Business Management B S 

Esther Elizabeth Morrison... Spartanburg, SC 

Language & International Trade 

Laura Kristen Morton Simpsonville, SC 

Communication Studies 

Rebecca Kathleen Moseley Central, SC 

Psychology 

Carson Nicholas Mosso Columbia, SC 

Physics 

Katherine Lee Mostertz Clemson, SC 

Psychology 

Benjamin Manning Muller... Johns Island, SC 

Wildlife And Fisheries Biology 

Cassandra Avery Munson Moore, SC 

Political Science 




218 



Ji 



Senior Portraits 



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Thomas Weldon Munson Woodstock, GA 

Computer Science 

Melissa Joan Murgas Snellville, GA 

Nursing 

Bradley Johnathan Murphy Fountain Inn, SC 

Mechanical Engineering 

Darius Edward Murphy Edgemoor, SC 

Jurfgrass 

Kaitlyn Megan Murray Dunkirk, MD 

Biosystems Eng 

Matthew John Nadler Chappaqua, NY 

Marketing 

Joshua Daniel Nalley Easley, SC 

Business Management 

Kelsey Rae Nash Summerville, SC 

Biological Sciences 

Ryan Frederick Need Cornelius, NC 

Ceramics & Material Engineering 

Simone Neuhoff Sinnpsonville, SC 

Mechanical Engineering 

William Tyler Newton Lexington, KY 

Biological Sciences 

Kaitlin Erin Nichols Windermere, FL 

Sociology 

Aubrey James Noller Simpsonville, SC 

Food Science 

Jason Ryan Norris Pilesgrove, NJ 

Biological Sciences 

Kelsey Nicole Norton Hartsville, SC 

Nursing 
Christopher Lane Nossokoff .... Lexington, KY 

Accounting 



Bates Mccauley Nunamaker Greenwood, SC 

Management 

Kristin Nicole Nunnenkamp Waxhaw, NC 

Elementary Education 

Sandra Katherine O'Dell Ware Shoals, SC 

History 

Mariah Frances O'Toole Clemson, SC 

English 

Erica Ekene Okwuazi Central, SC 

Micro Biology W/ Bio Medicine 

Genna Blair Felicia Opatut Seneca, SC 

Management 

Javier Edgardo Orellana Greer, SC 

Mechanical Engineer 

Michael Owen Ouzts Manning, SC 

Biological Sciences 



Senior Portraits 



u 



219 



Seniors 



James Andrew Owens Liberty, SC 

Wildlife & Fisheries Biology 

Amanda Lea Padgett Summerville, SC 

Psychology 

Kasey Elizabeth Padgett Simpsonville, SC 

Elementary Education 

Kaitlyn Anne Pahel Greensboro, NC 

Architecture 

Ruth Joy Parker Easley, SC 

Marketing 

Brittany Parrish Aiken, SC 

Sociology 

Mack Oneal Partee Marvin, NC 

Turfgrass Science 

Helena Peace Clemson, SC 

Professional Communication 

Matthew Joel Pearson Anderson, SC 

Mechanical Engineering 

Justin Lloyd Peebles Summerville, SC 

Forest Resource Management 

Mac Doctor Pega Goose Creek, SC 

Mechanical Engineering 

Eric Lawrence Peoples Hockessin, DE 

Secondary Education-Social Studies 

Alexandra Evelin Perez Taylors, SC 

International Management 

Marjorie Perez Clemson, SC 

International Management 

Steven Perry Mclean, VA 

Communications Studies 

Aaron Jeffrey Peter Greer, SC 

Architecture 

Caroline Grace Peters Hilton Head Island, SC 
Elementary Education 

Susannah Leigh Peters Clemson, SC 

Elementary Education 

Adrian Nicole Peterson Spartanburg, SC 

Civil Engineering 

Kathryn Ann Peterson Fort Mill, SC 

Microbiology-Biomedicine 

Bradley Wright Phillips Greenville, SC 

Architecture 

Ryne Chamberlain Phillips Cheraw, SC 

Agricultural Mechanization & Engineering 

Tyler Franklin Phillips Greenville, SC 

History 

Andrew Jeremy Pittman Easley, SC 

Biological Sciences 




220 



Senior Portraits 




Ryan Stephen Polsinelli Savannah, GA 

Psychology 

Hannah Louise Ponder Greer, SC 

Nursing 

Nicole Courtney Poston Johnsonville, SC 

Animal & Veterinary Science 
Pre-Vet Concentration 

Lauren Margaret Powell Marlton, NJ 

Nursing 

Jessica Renae Powers Hemingway, SC 

Biological Science 

Christopher Mark Prescop Central, SC 

Civil Engineering 

Kayla Wynne Prevatte Georgetown, SC 

Elementary Education 

Geoffrey Edward Pritchett Woodruff, SC 

Mechanical Engineering 

Sara Hastings Provost Summerville, SC 

Community Recreation, Sport, 
Camp Management 

Ronald Thomas Pruitt Spartanburg, SC 

Financial Management 
Breanne Therese Przestrzelski Swannanoa, NC 

Bioengineering 

Kelley Jordan Puckett Orangeburg, SC 

Health Science 

Amanda Lynn Qiu Greenville, SC 

Pre-Pharmacy 

Kanika Harshad Raja Anderson, SC 

Biological Sciences 

Karrin Nicole Reed Inman, SC 

Psychology 

Thomas Allen Reeder Camden, SC 

Turfgrass 

Rhett Ricard Pomaria, SC 

Chemistry & History 
Abigail Elizabeth Mabel Richardson. Clemson, SC 

Civil Engineering 

Alexander Ryan Richardson North Augusta, SC 

Mechanical Engineering 

Alison Emily Richman Plainsboro, NJ 

Communication Studies 

Jason Keith Richmond Central, SC 

Mechanical Engineering 

Scott Warner Rickard Landenberg, PA 

Graphic Communications 

Alexander Matthias Rike Clemson, SC 

Economics 

Samuel David Ring Novato, CA 

Language & International Trade 



Senior Portraits 



u 



221 



Seniors 



Brittany Rae Robinson Greenville, SC 

Electrical Engineering 

Jeffrey Craig Robinson Piedmont, SC 

Industrial Engineering 

Sarah Helen Rochester Piedmont, SC 

Mathematics Teaching 

David William Rodatz Easley, SC 

English-Writing & Publications 

Cecily Mecole Rodgers Clemson, SC 

Biological Science 

Tyler Jennings Rodrigue Greer, SC 

Management 

Margaret Abigail Rogers Anderson, SC 

Marketing 

Logan Nicole Roof Rock Hill, SC 

Microbiology-Biomedicine 



Stacey Holbrook Rosenlund Midlothian, VA 

Marketing 

Teal Meredith Rosenlund ...Spartanburg, SC 

Early Childhood Education 

Ellen Suzanne Ross Florence, SC 

Graphic Communications 

James Richard Rubel Spartanburg, SC 

Mechanical Engineering 

Ashlyn Ellen Ruczko Chapin, SC 

Health Science 

Hope Russell Vestavia, AL 

Psychology 

Sarah Katelyn Rutland Ward, SC 

Health Sciences 

Jenna Michelle Saine Marietta, GA 

Spanish & International Trade 

Thomas Blake Sanders Simpsonville, SC 

Biological Sciences 

Samantha Gayle Sardone Cherry Hill, NJ 

Special Education 

Lauren Elizabeth Sarson Bedford, MA 

Language & International Trade 
Alex Jeffrey Sato Wilton, CT 

Marketing 

Heather Ashley Satterfield Anderson, SC 

Mechanical Engineering 
Wade Neely Robinson. Savant Winter Haven, FL 

History 

Ashleigh Marie Scheidler .... Liberty Twp, OH 

Biological Sciences 

Daniel Ingram Schellinger . . Clifton Park, NY 

Mechanical Engineering 




222 



Ji 



Senior Portraits 



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Adam Joel Schiller Tipp City, OH 

Accounting 

Eric Jeffrey Schmieler Canonsburg, PA 

Biological Sciences / Spanish (Minor 

Christopher Scott Schultz Pendleton, SC 

Ciivil Engineering 

Kristy Marie Schweighardt Jupiter, FL 

Health Science 

Dylan Wade Scurry Florence, SC 

Biological Sciences 

Jillian Marie Sealy Forest Acres, SC 

Biological Sciences/Psychology 

John William Searcy Summerville, SC 

Visual Arts 

Claire Elizabeth Sellers Landrum, SC 

Health Science 

Whitney Michele Sewell Ridgeland, SC 

Nursing 
Beck Chandler Shadinger.. Douglasville, GA 

English 

Jonathan Kevin Sharpe Aiken, SC 

Biological Sciences 

Katherine Irene Sharpe Greer, SC 

Early Childhood Education 

Allison Ann Shaw Newberry, SC 

Food Science 

Brandi Skye Sherbert Simpsonville, SC 

Biological Sciences 

Ashley Carrie Sheridan Easley, SC 

Management 

William Robert Shipes Williston, SC 

Mathematical Sciences 

Ryan Edward Shiverdecker... Cincinnati, OH 

Economics 

Justin Richard Simmons Mount Airy, NC 

Electrical Engineering 

Kathryn Elizabeth Simmons Swansea, SC 

English (Writing & Publication Studies) 

Katie Marie Skinner Ravenel, SC 

Industrial Engineering 

Kathlyn Deeann Sloan Dallas, TX 

Biological Sciences/Spanish 
Jennifer Alyssa Smetana.. Huntingtown, MD 

Architecture 

Anna Lauren Smith Camden, SC 

Special Education 

Austin Gardner Smith Hendersonville, TN 

Mechanical Engineering 



Senior Portraits 



tm 



223 



Seniors 






Blair Louise Smith Summerville, SC 

Health Science 

Caroline O'Connor Smith Conway, SC 

Psychology (Ba 

Kandace Cheree Smith Easley, SC 

Animal And Veterinary Science 

Kendra Renee Smith Longview, TX 

Political Science 

Nicole Deborah Smith Matthews, NC 

Electrical Engineering 

Shelley Lynn Smith Clemson, SC 

Secondary Education History 

Tyler Davisson Smith Oakton, VA 

Chemical Engineering 

Lauren Hope Snipes Camaen, SC 

Communication Studies 

Philip Taylor Sobash Irmo, SC 

Biological Sciences 

Allison Nicole Sowell North Augusta, SC 

Pre Rehabilitation Sciences 

James Gray Sparks Clemson, SC 

Financial Management 
Michael Peterson Spitz.. Mount Pleasant, SC 

Finance 

Lauren Elizabeth Spivey Pinopolis, SC 

Early Childhood Education 

Jordan Richard Spivy Summerville, SC 

History 

Justin Brett Stackhouse Greenwood, SC 

Electrical Engineering 

Andrew Thomas Stanton Clemson, SC 

Civil Engineering 

Rebecca Elizabeth Stenger Murrells Inlet, SC 

Nursing 

Patrick Riley Stephens Grayson, GA 

Communication/Political Science 
Thomas Michael Stephens .. Simpsonville, SC 

Performing Arts 

Lane Joseph Stevens Camden, SC 

Graphic Communications 

Caroline Redmond Stoddard. Greenville, SC 

Biochemistry 

Elizabeth Schilling Stone Johnston, SC 

Accounting 

Jessie Coker Strickland Florence, SC 

Psychology 

Sarah Marie Strickland Lexington, SC 

Nursing 




224 



a 



Senior Portraits 




Thomas Dabney Strickland Greer, SC 

Applied Economics 

Davian Jamal Strother Irmo. SC 

Business Management 

Ronesha Lynn Strozier Conley, GA 

Environmental & Natural Resources 

Mary Knight Stuckey Hartsville, SC 

Health Science 

James Patrick Sturgis Greenville, SC 

History 

Melissa Susan Sudol Clover, SC 

Financial Management 

Brannon Elizabeth Sulka Bluffton, SC 

History 

Daniel Lee Sullivan East Brunswick, NJ 

Psychology 

Blake Edward Summer Irmo, SC 

Mechanical Engineering 

Carly Frances Summers Lewes, DE 

Wildlife & Fisheries Biology 

Samantha Kay Sutton Rock Hill, SC 

Political Science 

Kelly Hyatt Suydam Columbia. SC 

Nursing 

Lindsay Swan Central, SC 

English 

Hannah Marie Swank Seneca, SC 

History/Sociology 

Garrett Swann Georgetown, SC 

Animal & Vetetinary Sciences 

Fred Skyler Switzer IV Seneca, SC 

Physics 

Lauren Michelle Talboom South Bend, IN 

Political Science 

Page Davis Tarleton Greenville, SC 

Construction Science & Management 

Jennifer Lee Templeton Simpsonville, SC 

Prtm 

John Maxwell Thomas Belton, SC 

Sociology 

Nancy Elizabeth Thomas Beaufort, SC 

Biological Sciences 

Nicole Lauren Thomas Sunrise, FL 

English 

Adam Sheppard Thompson... Tega Cay, SC 

Environmental Geology 

Clayton Andrew Thompson Simpsonville, SC 

Construction Science, Management 



Senior Portraits 



- 



225 



Seniors 



William Russell Tindal Moncks Corner, SC 

Civil Engineering 

Laura Frances Todd Clemson, SC 

Electrical Engineering 

Zachary Boyce Todd Chapin, SC 

Mechanical Engineering 

Danielle Marie Tom Idaho Falls, ID 

Genetics 

Margaret Paulling Tompkins... Columbia, SC 

Marketing 

William Daniel Traber Easley, SC 

Management 

HuuHoangTran Rock Hill, SC 

Genetics 

Jillian Elizabeth Traver Hilton Head Island, SC 

L & It French /Political Science 

Todd Allen Trotter Liberty, SC 

Environmental Natural Resources 
Management 

Annsley Marie Troxell Anderson, SC 

Biological Sciences 

Sarah M. Truckenbrodt Greenville, SC 

Mechanical Engineering 

Amanda Nicole Truesdale Lancaster, SC 

Biological Sciences / Pre-Pharmacy 

Jordan Anthony Truesdale Saint Stephen, SC 
Constuction Science & Management 

Cathleen Taylor Tupper Summerville, SC 

Psychology 

Janey Harrison Tupper Summerville, SC 

L&lh 

Alexandra Lauren Turnage Walhalla, SC 

Psychology 

Dillon Brent Turner Chapin, SC 

Civil Engineering 

Hugo Louis Turra Greer, SC 

Marketing 

Samuel Joseph Van Gieson Greer, SC 

Marketing 

Joel Robert Vandevrede Charlotte, NC 

Computer Information Systems 

Nicole Gabriela Vanegas Winnsboro, SC 

Psychology 

Katherine Martha Velten Bolton, MA 

English 

John David Vogelzang Belle Mead, NJ 

Accounting / Finance Management 

Dylan Elizabeth Wallace Westfield, NJ 

Sociology 




226 



a 



Senior Portraits 




Ii4 





Taylor Garnet Wallace Rock Hill, SC 

Civil Engineering 

Yi Jie Wang Myrtle Beach. SC 

Microbiology 

Elizabeth Ward Nashville, TN 

Marketing 

Grayson Paul Ward Columbia, SC 

Packaging Sciences 

Jordan Marie Ward Effingham, SC 

Food Science - Nutrition 

Charles Nicholas Wardlaw Anderson, SC 

Political Science 

Rachel Dyan Wasylyk Waxhaw, NC 

Biological Sciences 

Shane Cleveland Watford Hartsville, SC 

Packaging Science 

Anna Grace Watkins Cheraw, SC 

Psychology 

James Easton Burns Watkins Rock Hill, SC 

Management 

Brittany Nichole Watson Hemingway, SC 

Nursing 

Caitlin Mari Weatherwax Clemson, SC 

Early Childhood Education 

Christopher Weber Fort Mill, SC 

Economics 

Jeremy Weinberg Clemson, SC 

Accounting 

Lindsay Ann Welker Tifton, GA 

Health Science 

Christopher Michael West Greer, SC 

Mechanical Engineering 

Virginia Anne West Clemson, SC 

Food Science & Technology 

Ashbin Jamal White Hemingway, SC 

Electrical Engineering 

Megan Brooke Whitehead Forsyth, GA 

Health Science 

Jared Richard Wicker Prosperity, SC 

Biological Sciences 

Rebecca Faith Wiener Dresher, PA 

Psychology 

Tucker James Wigington Matthews, NC 

Parks & Conservation Area Management 

James Wilbanks Central, SC 

Mechanical Engineering 

Elizabeth Price Wilkes Greenville, SC 

Special Education 



Senior Portraits 



1227 



Seniors 



Christine Evelyn Wilkins Greer. SC 

Accounting 
Ashley Danielle Williams .. Travelers Rest, SC 

Nursing 

Carter Ellis Williams Greenville, SC 

Health Science 

Joanna Elizabeth Williams... Huntersville, NC 

Secondary Education-History 

Katherine Ann Williams Asheboro, NC 

Marketing 

Kelsey Elaine Williams Cincinnati, OH 

Health Sciences 

Megan Elizabeth Williams Greer, SC 

Early Childhood Education 

Natasha Shantell Williams Atlanta, GA 

Microbiology - Biomedicine 

Sheliah Quishanna Williams... Anderson, SC 

Accounting 

Denton Williamson Columbia, SC 

Transportation Systems 

James Reed Williamson Crestview, SC 

Biological Sciences 

Melissa Gail Willis Anderson, SC 

Health Science 

Molly Elizabeth Willison Vienna, VA 

Accounting 

Joshua Thomas Willoughby ... Columbia, SC 

Financial Management 

Kathryn Dianne Wilson Seneca, SC 

Early Childhood Education 
Krystine Danielle Wilson... Basking Ridge, NJ 

Accounting 



Thomas Christopher Wilson Spartanburg, SC 

Electrical Engineering 

Catharine Paxson Wingate .... Columbia, SC 

Health Sciences 

Katherine Branham Wood Lexington, SC 

Psychology 

Megan Woodard Clemson, SC 

Bio-Sci 

Lance Austin Worley Roswell, GA 

Marketing 

Lakeshia Shante Worthy Rock Hill, SC 

Packaging Science 
Louanne Melanie Woznicki... Wallingford, CT 
Financial Management And Political Science 

David Gunnar Wray Bethesda, MD 

Mechanical Engineering 




228 



Ji 



Senior Portraits 




Collin Davis Wright Summerville, SC 

Biological Sciences 
Lindsay Michelle Wright Mount Pleasant, SC 

Biochemistry 

Daniel Andrew Wurst Anaerson, SC 

Chemical Engineering 

Benjamin Andrew Wyszynski Aiken, SC 

Architecture 

Morgan Elizabeth Yarborough. West Columbia, SC 

Nursing 

Jennifer Lynne Yenawine Fayetteville, AR 

Civil Engineering 

Leah Suzanne Yokel Greenville, SC 

Marketing 

Eliana Zamora Tercero Seneca, SC 

Language/International Trade/French 

Miguel Angel Zayas Greer, SC 

Biological Sciences (Pre-Pharmacy) 
Erin Jeanne Zepp.. Montgomery Village, MD 

Genetics 

Henry Simon Zhang York, SC 

Biological Sciences 

Daniel Steven Zimmerman Rock Hill, SC 

Management 



Senior Portraits H'-^H229 



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Underclassmen 



Arianna Paige Aaron 2015 

Lafayette Hill, PA 

Anna Katherine Abbott 2014 

Fountain Inn, SC 

Ash Newman Abel 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Julia Ann Abraham 2015 

North Charleston, SC 

James Crafton Acker 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Alisha Michelle Ackerman 2015 

North Charleston, SC 

Anne Miller Adams 2015 

Kingstree, SC 

Lauren Ashley Adams 2015 

Irmo, SC 

William Taylor Adams 2015 

Florence, SC 

Kelsey Elizabeth Adamson 2015 

Charlotte, NC 

Morgan Rebecca Adcock 2015 

Chapin, SC 

Kevin Gerard Addison 2015 

Holly Hill, SC 

Parker William Adkins 2015 

Lexington. SC 

Arik Edward Adrian 2015 

Charlotte, NC 

Salman Sayed Alam 2015 

Clemson, SC 

Alvero Alamada 2014 

Central, SC 

Amy Leeanne Albrecht 2015 

Woodbine, MD 

Sara Mae Albritton 2015 

Fort Worth, TX 

Tyler William Allan 2015 

Stafford, VA 

Zachary Sawyer Alley 2015 

Charlotte, NC 

Chelsia Margaret Allison 2015 

Piedmont, SC 

Mary Rose Amoresano 2015 

Hasbrouck Heights, NJ 

Ashley Anderson 2014 

Easley, SC 

Denzel Mandez Anderson 2015 

Greenwood, SC 




232 



Underclassman Portraits 




Jeffrey Antonio Anderson 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Jennifer Kristin Anderson 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Matthew Perry Anderson 2015 

Irmo, SC 

Patrick Connor Andrews 2015 

Hilton Head, SC 

Rachel Andrews 2014 

Greenville, SC 

Rachel Lynn Annese 2015 

Billerica, MA 

Brian Scott Anthony 2015 

Yorba Linda, CA 

Joseph Wilson Apple 2013 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Katherine Grey Apple 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 
Mitchell David Appleby 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 
Emily Christine Armstrong 2015 

Spartanburg, SC 
Katherine Lynn Armstrong 2015 

Spartanburg, SC 



Underclassman Portraits I I 233 



- 



Underclassmen 



Grace Christine Arney 2015 

Huntsville, AL 

Evan Arriaza 2015 

Taylors, SC 

Jeremy William Arvay 2015 

Columbia SC 

Amber Kelsey Arvia 2015 

Dublin, OH 

Lauren Elizabeth Ashe 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Tony Ghassan Ashy 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Nia Monet Avila 2015 

Holly Hill, SC 

Brittany Anne Avin 2015 

Greenville, NC 

Brent James Ayers 2015 

Greer, SC 
Jacob Lee Ayers 2015 

Columbia, SC 
Michelle Nicole Azzarello 2015 

Matthews, NC 
Grace Caroline Bachewiig 2015 

Plymouth, MN 



234 



a 



Underclassman Portraits 





Jordan Philipp Baer 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Daniel Tucker Bagbey 2015 

Richmond, VA 

Andrea Katherine Bagley 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Julia Scott Bagnal 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Caleb Michael Bailey 2015 

Six Mile, SC 

Elliot Andrew Bailey 2015 

Greer, SC 

James Patrick Bailey 2015 

Raleigh, NC 

Kyle Bradley Bailey 2015 

Milton, GA 

Preston Ernest Bailey 2015 

Greer, SC 

Scott Bailey 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Andrew Zachary Baker 2015 

Awendaw, SC 

Ethan Thomas Baker 2015 

Summerville, SC 

Marshall Boggs Baker 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Ricky Orville Baker 2015 

Goose Creek, SC 

Shannon Paige Baker 2014 

Columbia. SC 

Wilson Reginald Baker 2013 

Townville, SC 

Doug Baldwin 2014 

Aiken, SC 

Jessica Leigh Baldwin 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Hudson Marie Ballenger 2015 

Spartanburg, SC 

William Justin Ballentine 2015 

Summerville, SC 

Francesco Noelle Banaag 2015 

Lincoln Park, NJ 

Preston Bruce Bankson 2015 

Florence, SC 

Matthew Scott Barclay 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Haley Elizabeth Barefoot 2015 

Raleigh, NC 



Underclassman Portraits 



L 



235 



Underclassmen 



Allen Jackson Barnes 2015 

Sumter, SC 

Benjamin Barnes 2014 

Port Royal, SC 

Gabriella Christina Barnes 2015 

Blythewood, SC 

Sarah Anne Barnes 2015 

Blythewood, SC 

Hayes Austin Barnett 2013 

Greer, SC 

William Campbell Barnett 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Alex Houston Barrett 2015 

Taylors, SC 

Christian Geddings Barrineau 2015 

Sumter, SC 

Julian Kendall Barringer 2015 

Aiken. SC 

Brett Barry 2014 

Newtown, PA 

Sarah Victoria Barry 2015 

Cranford, NJ 

Garrett Benjamin Basil 2015 

Lawrenceville, GA 

Brantley Jordan Bass 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Brandon Daniel Boston 2015 

Cumming, GA 

Timothy James Bate 2015 

Central, SC 

Ian Russell Bateman 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Austin Alphonso Baten 2013 

Greenwood, SC 

Michael Harrison Bates 2015 

Alpharetta, GA 

Olivia Lenoir Batson 2015 

Pickens, SC 

Marcus Todd Baxley 2013 

Marion, SC 

Breanna Marie Beck 2014 

Goose Creek, SC 

Kelly Maria Becker 2015 

Cockeysville, MD 

Jordan Beckman 2014 

Columbia, SC 

Rebecca Leigh Bedford 2015 

Hillsborough, CA 




fc 



236 



a 



Underclassman Portraits 




Sadaris Dante Benjamin 2015 

Gadsden, SC 

Anna Alexandra Bennett 2015 

Port Monmouth, NJ 

Hayes Mayfield Bennett 2015 

Conway, SC 

Jeffrey Thomas Bennett 2015 

Roebuck, SC 

Anna Louise Bensch 2015 

Bluffton. SC 

Wayne Carl Benson 2015 

Windsor, SC 

Brittany Komisar Bentz 2015 

Wayne, PA 

Kyle Anthony Berger 2015 

Saint Stephen, SC 

Laura Ashlyn Berglind 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Anjali Jenna Bergren 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Alexis Jordan Berry 2014 

Chapin, SC 

Jamison Victor Berry 2015 

North Myrtle Beach, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



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Underclassmen 



Dustin Joseph Bertelsen 2015 

Charlotte, NC 

Dean Michael Bessette 2015 

Sumter, SC 

Joshua William Beste 2015 

Bluffton, SC 

Megan Rae Betzel 2015 

Landrum, SC 

Brian Marshall Beuerman 2015 

Goose Creek, SC 

Matthew Wade Bickford 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Alexander Steven Bickley 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Adam Anthony Bidwell 2015 

Orangeburg, SC 

Alexandra Lang Billhardt 2015 

Monkton, MD 

Alexander Edward Bischoff 2015 

Hilton Head, SC 

Trey Cameron Black 2015 

Walterboro, SC 

Thomas Alexander Blackwell 2015 

Charlotte, NC 




238 



Underclassman Portraits 




Mikayla Leigh Bladow 2015 

Fort Collins, CO 
Katelyn Marie Blair 2015 

Bel Air, MD 
Robert Mason Blair 2013 

Sharon, SC 
Roneisha Tearre Blakeney 2015 

Shelby, NC 

Brittany Elaine Blanchard 2015 

Lorton, VA 

Clinton Shaquille Blanding 2015 

Jownville, SC 

Walker Mcrae Blanding 2015 

Sumter, SC 

Andrew James Blanton 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Brianna Addison Blanton 2015 

Summerville, SC 

James William Blanton 2015 

Gaffney, SC 

Taylor Vivian Blanton 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Blake Thomas Blasingame 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Garret Carl Blount 2015 

Piscataway, NJ 

Mary Elizabeth Blum 2014 

Simpsonville, SC 

Emily Norris Blumer 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Harriet Greneker Boatwright 2015 

Mt Pleasant, SC 

David Bruce Boerma 2013 

Greenville, SC 

Katelyn Elise Bond 2015 

Moncks Corner, SC 

Joshua Spence Borczak 2015 

Fayetteville, GA 

William Tyler Boswell 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Bryndle Laine Bottoms 2014 

Fort Mill, SC 

Clay Goodman Bowden 2015 

Greer, SC 

Ellyn Rebecca Bowen 2015 

Lawrenceville, GA 

Christine Elizabeth Bowers 2015 

Daniel Island, SC 



_ 



Underclassman Portraits 



1239 



Underclassmen 



Jack Edward Bowling 2015 

New Orleans, LA 

Adrienne Marie Boyd 2015 

Loris, SC 

Grea Elizabeth Boyd 2015 

Fort Mill. SC 

Margaret Spencer Boyd 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Shemeka Boyd 2014 

Rock Hill, SC 

Whitney Logan Boyd 2015 

Blackstock, SC 

Katharine Bailey Brackett 2015 

Pawleys Island, SC 

Clayton Wayne Bradshaw 2015 

Boiling Springs, SC 

Sarah Elizabeth Bragg 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Harrison Edward Bramlette 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Kathleen Brand 2013 

Lugoff, SC 

Caelin Gabrielle Brannen 2015 

Taylors, SC 

Kelly Dakota Branton 2015 

Lincolnton, NC 

John Patrick Brennan 2015 

Kensington, MD 

Joshua Davis Brewton 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Douglas Alexander Bridgeman 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Michael Jarrod Bridges 2015 

Darlington, SC 

Patricia Caroline Britt 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Megan Arlene Broadwater 2015 

Chapin, SC 

Brittany Broome 2015 

Taylors, SC 

Tunisia Danielle Broome 2015 

Ridgeway, SC 

Megan Marie Brovan 2015 

Columbia, SC 

James Carlton Brown 2015 

Walterboro, SC 

Katherine Grace Brown 2015 

Port Royal, SC 




240 



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Underclassman Portraits 




Kristina Brown 2014 

Greenville, SC 

Lauren Elizabeth Brown 2013 

Florence, SC 

Megan Michelle Brown 2014 

Lake City, SC 

Tianna Terrell Brown 2015 

Gadsden, SC 

William Powell Browning 2015 

Potomac, MD 

Emmett William Bruffey 2015 

Summerville, SC 

Trent Brunson 2014 

Irmo, SC 

Kathryn Tiernan Bryan 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Rosaria Caroline Bryan 2015 

Sumter, SC 

Stewart Alexander Bryant 2015 

Florence, SC 

Benjamin Paul Bryla 2015 

Bethesda, MD 

Brenton Clay Buckner 2015 

Blacksburg, SC 



Underclassman Portrait: 



L 



241 



Underclassmen 



Jeremy Thomas Buff 2015 

Greer, SC 
Sarah Buff 2014 

Piedmont, SC 
Victoria Jayne Bujak 2015 

Columbia, SC 
Calvin Kafer Bultz 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Bradford Lee Buncomb 2015 

North Augusta SC 

Courtney Danielle Bunton 2015 

Smooks, SC 

Celina Joann Burchett 2015 

Sarasota, FL 

Lucille Lorick Burckhalter 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Heather Deanne Burdette 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Grayson Hunter Burdine 2015 

Easley, SC 

Dusti Caitlyn Burgess 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Jonathan Jay Burgiel 2015 

Orlando, FL 




242 



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Underclassman Portraits 









Nicole Elise Burkart 2015 

Great Falls, VA 

Caroline Marie Burke 2015 

Naples, FL 

Emily Marie Burke 2015 

Chapel Hill, NC 

Shannon Haley Burkhalter 2015 

Easley, SC 

Nicole Reed Burkhart 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Abigail Lee Burnette 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Elizabeth Leary Burns 2015 

Sandwich, MA 

Jeffrey Burns 2014 

Sumter, SC 

Margaret Cairy Burns 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Morgan Elizabeth Burns 2015 

Moore, SC 

Kylie Marie Burts 2015 

Greer, SC 

Matthew Clay Buse 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Madison Ann Butler 2015 

Shamong, NJ 

Jabria Keiswonna Byers 2015 

Gaffney, SC 

William Brock Byers 2015 

Shelby, NC 

Alex Bylenga 2014 

Greenville, SC 

Dylan Spenser Byrd 2015 

Lake Wylie, SC 

Matthew James Byrd 2015 

Greer, SC 

Wayne Byrd 2014 

Florence, SC 

Leslie Anne Cade 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Jordan Walker Caiola 2015 

Bolton, CT 

John Charles Callanan 2015 

Needham, MA 

Jonathan Campbell 2014 

Chapin, SC 

Scott Edward Campbell 2014 

Silver Spring, MD 



Underclassman Portraits 



- 



243 



Underclassmen 



Christopher Louis Campione 2015 

Edison, NJ 

Anna Logan Cantrell 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Nicholas Matthew Cappola 2015 

Pompono Beach, FL 

Lisa Anne Car 2015 

Fort Mill, SC 

Ashlee Renee Carbone 2015 

Ladson, SC 

William Walter Carlson 2015 

Boonton Township, NJ 

Ariel Rhea Carpenter 2015 

Goose Creek, SC 

Kristen Mae Carpenter 2015 

Mooresville, NC 

Kyle Gary Carpenter 2015 

Frederick, MD 

Kaitlynn Nicole Carraway 2015 

Goose Creek, SC 

Elizabeth Johanna Carroll 2015 

Daniel Island, SC 

Jessica Scott Carroll 2015 

Easley, SC 

Kyle Gregory Carroll 2015 

Norway, SC 

Lydia M. Cartagena 2015 

Jackson, NJ 

Cameron Reed Carter 2015 

Summerville, SC 

Gary Scott Carter 2015 

North Charleston, SC 

Lauren Elizabeth Carter 2015 

Spartanburg, SC 

Margarette Ann Carter 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Mary Margaret Carter 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Sam Reiser Caruso 2015 

Kildeer, IL 

Yasrian Devonne Carvey 2015 

Upper Marlboro, MD 

Wesley Cason Carwile 2015 

Abbeville, SC 

Nicole Barbour Cary 2015 

Mechanic Falls, ME 

Leigh Ann Casaceli 2015 A 

Hudson, MA m 



244 



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Underclassman Portraits 





Charlotte Emma Case 2015 

Newton, NJ 

Michael Wesley Cash 2015 

Greer. SC 

Michael James Cassibry 2015 

Columbia SC 

John Paul Cassil 2013 

State Road, NC 

Matthew Raymond Castello 2015 

Greer, SC 

Charles Guy Castles 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Christopher O'Neal Caudle 2015 

Weldon, NC 

Gregory Thomas Caulfield 2015 

Irmo, SC 

John Mcintosh Chapman 2015 

Hartsville, SC 
Christopher Jay Chaudhary 2015 

Anderson, SC 
Lauren Elizabeth Chavis 2015 

Charlotte, NC 
Franklin Harmon Cheeks 2015 

Prosperity, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



1245 



Underclassmen 



Wesley Kenneth Cheung 2015 

Medfield, MA 

Matthew Paul Chicky 2015 

Greer, SC 

Lauren Frances Childers 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Jonathan David Childes 2015 

Greer, SC 

Stephanie Rueih Jyun Chiu 2015 

Greer, SC 

Claire Lindsay Church 2015 

Atlanta GA 

Shelli Francesco Ciandella 2015 

Mt Pleasant SC 

Katherine Judith Ciardi 2015 

Myrtle Beach, SC 

Arianna Cipollone 2015 

Windham, NH 

Chadd Austen Clark 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Christina Clark 2014 

Central, SC 

Colleen Jenna Clark 2015 

Hilton Head Island, SC 

Devin Lee Clark 2015 

Chapin, SC 

Kelsey Clausman 2014 

Frederick, MD 

Antwyone Markise Clayborne 2015 

Winnsboro, SC 

Barrett Weston Clayton 2015 

Greer, SC 

Valerie Lynn Clements 2015 

Central, SC 

Collin Andrew demons 2015 

Canton, Ml 

Jillian Leigh Clinton 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Christopher Coats 2014 

Kershaw, SC 

Andrew Lehron Cobb 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Leonard James Cochrane 2015 

Piedmont, SC 

Charl Coetser 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Nicholas Thomas Coffer 2015 

Union, SC 



246 



J 



Underclassman Portraits 








Carolyn Lenore Coffey 2015 

Deland, FL 

Joseph Taylor Cole 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Meredith Patricia Cole 2015 

Mills River, NC 

Alexander Mat Coleman 2015 

Saluda, SC 

Jacob Coleman 2013 

Seneca, SC 

Bradford Scott Collins 2015 

Beaufort, SC 

Daniel Bartlett Collins 2015 

Silver Spring, MD 

Matthew Brian Collins 2015 

Mansfield, MA 

Molly Brianna Collins 2013 

Abbeville, SC 

Sean William Collins 2015 

Easley. SC 

Tatiara Caibrett Collins 2015 

Beaufort, SC 

Tommy Collins 2014 

Murrells Inlet, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



1247 



Raymond Scott Collison 2013 

Gainesville, GA 

Christopher Kessler Colnitis 2015 

Baldwin, MD 

Rivers Colyer 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Thomas Frazer Comer 2015 

Aiken, SC 

John Matthew Compton 2015 

Piedmont, SC 

Austin Keith Condict 2015 

Athens, GA 

Nicholas Adam Cone 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Kevin Thomas Conley 2015 

Salem, SC 

Cole Edwards Connor 2015 

Dalzell, SC 

Lindsey Kate Contella 2015 

York, ME 

Anna Elizabeth Cook 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Ivy Elizabeth Cook 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 



Underclassmen 




fclllASOH 



248 



a 



Underclassman Portraits 




Wallace Saxon Cook 2015 

Seneca SC 

Caroline Hope Cooper 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Jabian Mon'Tell Cooper 2015 

Lake City, SC 

Kelly Lynn Cooper 2014 

Winnsboro, SC 

Madison Breanne Cooper 2015 

Georgetown, SC 

Austin Jay Cope 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Jennifer Marie Copley 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Krystal Lynn Corasio 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Patrick Mcnary Corley 2015 

Duluth, GA 

Langston Hagan Corn 2015 

Piedmont, SC 

Christopher Alexander Cornejo 201 5 

Woodstock, GA 

Devon Marquis Cornelius 2015 

Denmark, SC 

Caitlin Ruth Corrigan 2015 

Alexandria, VA 

Tara Leighanne Cothran 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Turner Lee Cotterman 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Car/ Kathleen Cottrell 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Robert Thomas Coughlin 2015 

Sparta, NJ 

Kennedy Sims Coulter 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Corinne Taylor Cowan 2015 

Germantown, TN 

Brandon Lee Cox 2015 

Dalzell, SC 

Caleb Reed Cox 2014 

Taylors, SC 

Elise Danae Cox 2015 

Taylors, SC 

Haden Tyler Cox 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Steven Matthew Cox 2013 

Charleston, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



■1249 



Underclassmen 



Dorsey Elizabeth Craft 2013 

Orangeburg, SC 

Dru Lane Craft 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Matthew Douglas Craig 2015 

Ambler, PA 

Kirby Caroline Cranford 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Emily Hope Cranston 2015 

Hilton Head Island, SC 

Christina Marie Craven 2015 

Greer, SC 

Caitlin Colby Crawford 2015 

Boca Raton, FL 

Katie Lee Crawford 2015 

Hilton Head Island, SC 

Elizabeth Leigh Creel 2014 

Fair Play, SC 

Casey Jean Cresbaugh 2015 

Sparta, NJ 

Haley Elizabeth Cribb 2015 

Marion, SC 

Matthew Lynn Crisp 2015 

Rowesville, SC 

Aaron Ray Crocker 2015 

Anderson, SC 

George Parker Cromley 2015 

Pawleys Island, SC 

Morgan Elizabeth Cross 2015 

Long Valley, NJ 

Callie Crowder 2014 

Bensalem, PA 

Carrie Crowder 2014 

Aiken, SC 

Christopher Ryan Crumley 2014 

Jackson, SC 

Alison Nicole Cucci 2015 

Melville. NY 

TjCullum 2014 

Mt Pleasant, SC 

Timothy John Cunningham 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Matthew Irby Cureton 2014 

Cumming, GA 

Tyler Ladd Cushman 2015 

Pendleton, SC 

Kevin Michael Czajka 2015 

Mauldin, SC 




250 



Ji 



Underclassman Portraits 




Sarah D'Amico 2014 

Fort Mill, SC 

Jeremy Gabriel Dale 2015 

Woolwich Township, NJ 

Molly Christine Dalva 2015 

Mount Pleasant SC 

Dove Stefi Dario 2015 

Warren, Rl 

Christin Michelle Darling 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Christopher Robert Datko 2015 

Fort Mill, SC 

Kathryn Lynne Dougherty 2015 

Yorktown, VA 

Grant Garner Davidson 2015 

Bishopville, SC 

Hannah Kay Davie 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Ashley Meree Davis 2015 

Neeses, SC 

Courtney Davis 2014 

Florence, SC 

Kathryn Davis 2014 

Batesburg, SC 



Underclassman Portraits ^*^B 251 



L 



Underclassmen 



Lauren Celeste Davis 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Logan Derek Davis 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Andrew Keith Davisson 2013 

Anderson, SC 

Griftin Van Buren Day 2015 

Shady Side, MD 

Jessica Taylor Day 2015 

Hilton Head Island, SC 
DaneDe Bar 2014 

Mt Pleasant, SC 
Alana De Klerk 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 
Cody Mitchell Deas 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Justin Alexander Dees 2015 

Greer, SC 

Alexandra Defore 2014 

Seneca, SC 

John Marshall Deke 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Danielle Lavina Demario 2015 

Great River, NY 




252 



Underclassman Portraits 



- 




Joshua Paul Dempsey 2015 

Central, SC 

Dev Kanak Desai 2015 

Fort Mill, SC 

Austin Sean Desjardin 2015 

Merrit Island, FL 

Armand James Desollar 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Cassandra Lowana Devol 20 1 5 

Clemson, SC 
Michael William Devon 2015 

Greenville, SC 
Olivia Vaigneur Devore 2013 

Greenville, SC 
Kristen Lynn Devries 2015 

Lincolnshire, IL 

Sarah Lyne Dickenson 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Kelsey Dickman 2014 

York, SC 

Bria Noelle Dillard 2015 

Taylors, SC 

Nicholas Paul Dimatteo 2015 

Fort Mill. SC 

William Gage Dingeldein 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Luke Alexander Dipietro 2015 

Easley, SC 

Delaney Lee Disher 2015 

Austin, TX 

May Ngoc Do 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Melissa Dockins 2013 

Anderson, SC 

Emily Kate Dodgins 2015 

Seneca SC 

Jardin Nolandra Dogan 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

William Clark Dolfi 2015 

Pittsburgh, PA 

Tyler Matthew Donohue 2015 

Piedmont, SC 

Hannah Brooks Douglas 2015 

//•mo, SC 

Zachary Lee Doyle 2015 

York, SC 

Kensley Lee Drake 2015 

Greenville, SC 



A* , 



Underclassman Portraits 



■0253 



Underclassmen 



Nateisha Lashelle Drayton 2015 

Hollywood, SC 

Brittany Danielle Dreibrodt 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Ashley Drew 2014 

Simpsonville. SC 

April Marie Driscoll 2015 

Duncan, SC 

David Alan Druin 2015 

Greer, SC 

Andrew Curtis Dubose 2015 

Taylors, SC 

John William Dueck 2015 

Highlands Ranch, CO 

Henry Louis Duffie 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Brittany Anne Duffy 2015 

Mt Pleasant, SC 

Edward William Duffy 2015 

Sumter, SC 

James Duffy 2014 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Blaire Arlene Dugan 2015 

Marlton, NJ 

Courtney Morgan Dukes 2015 

Boiling Springs, SC 

David Eidson Dukes 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Vernetta Bianca Duncan 2015 

Garnett, SC 

Nicole Annette Dunham 2015 

Marietta, GA 

Katherine Gail Dunn 2014 

Greer, SC 

Rachel Rebecca Durant 2015 

Chapin, SC 

Sarah Cherry Dusenbury 2013 

Aynor, SC 

Paul David Dutkiewicz 2015 

Clemson, SC 

Andrew Edward Duvall 2015 

Basking Ridge, NJ 

Garrett Reid Brindisi Dwyre 2015 

Murrells Inlet, SC 

Timbra Dye 2014 

Irmo, SC 

Lullie Morgan Eason 2014 

Florence, SC 




254 



a 



Underclassman Portraits 




Margaret Virginia East 2013 

Rock Hill SC 
Schuyler Osbourn Easterling 2015 

Auxvasse, MO 
Elizabeth Nichole Eddings 2015 

Greenville, SC 
Adam Spencer Edge 2015 

Lake Wylie, SC 

Gregory Durst Edison 2015 

North Augusta, SC 
Cody Michael Edwards 2015 

Summerville, SC 
Katherine Ann Edwards 2015 

Orangeburg, SC 
Krista Elizabeth Edwards 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Collin James Eichhorn 2015 

Advance, NC 

Joseph Dale Elder 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Emily Grace Elliott 2015 

Charlotte, NC 

John Douglas Elliott 2015 

Columbia, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



■0255 



Underclassmen 



Margaret Maclaren Elliott 2015 

Beaufort, SC 

Allison Leigh Elrod 2014 

Anderson, SC 

Olivia Claudia Elswick 2013 

Myrtle Beach, SC 

Brandi Leigh Elvington 2015 

Florence, SC 

Lauren Elizabeth Embry 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Robert Keathley Emmett 2015 

Raleigh, NC 

Nicole Evelyn Engwall 2015 

Lancaster, PA 

Adrian Marie Eppley 2015 

Charlotte, NC 

Adrian Clarence Epps 2015 

Chesterfield, VA 

Jordan Philip Esposito 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Christopher Warren Essinger 2015 

Findlay, OH 

Jerusalem Estrada 2015 

Walhalla, SC 



256 



a 



Underclassman Portraits 





Elizabeth Ashlyn Ethridge 2015 

Marietta GA 

Daniel Harvey Evans 2015 

Columbia, MD 

Hillary Claire Evans 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Rebekah Lynn Evans 2015 

Easley, SC 

Austin Michael Evert 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Connor Jay Ex-Lubeskie 2015 

Goose Creek, SC 

Bethan Clare Fanning 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Andrew Nicholas Farmer 2015 

Pawleys Island, SC 

Sarah Morgan Farmer 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Kamairi Shantel Fayall 2015 

Saint Stephen, SC 

Vitaliy Fedonyuk 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Charles Alexander Fellers 2015 

Charlotte, NC 

Jessica Anne Feltracco 2015 

Cumming, GA 

Andrew David Ferguson 2015 

Greer, SC 

Christine Elizabeth Ferguson 2015 

Glen Allen, VA 

Charles Alfred Fernandez 2015 

Tampa, FL 

Jude Fernando 2013 

Pendleton, SC 
Pedro Rick Chaves Ferreira 2015 

Anderson, SC 
Kristen Fertig 2014 

Bonneau, SC 
Stephen Adair Fessler 2013 

Greenville, SC 

Andrew Joseph Fetty 2015 

Olney, MD 

Donna Lynn Fewell 2013 

Greenville, SC 

Carson A. Fields 2015 

Pewee Valley, KY 

Julia Elaine Filler 2015 

Windham, NH 



Underclassman Portraits 



mA 



Underclassmen 



Evan Alexander Finley 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Ellyn Frances Finney 2013 

Simpsonville, SC 

Peyton Taylor Fish 015 

Monson, MA 

William Barron Fishburne 2015 

Columbia. SC 

Brett Michael Fisher 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

George Fisher 2014 

Myrtle Beach, SC 

Kaitlin Rose Flack 2014 

Greenville, SC 

Zachary Wayne Flathmann 2015 

Fountain Inn, SC 

Leslie Ann Fleming 2015 

Mequon, Wl 

Morgan Elizabeth Fletcher 013 

North Augusta, SC 

Benjamin K. Floyd 2013 

Loris, SC 

Rebekah Gwinn Fogle 2015 

Easley, SC 

Sarah Ann Fogle 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Samuel Logan Foister 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Justin Prevost Ford 2015 

Pittsburgh, PA 

Katelyn Mae Forry 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Turner Jennings Fortner 2014 

Greenville, SC 

Brandon Allan Foster 2015 

Blythewood, SC 

Erika Ama Brago Aurel Fosu 2015 

Goose Creek, SC 

Michael Vincent Fotia 2015 

Hilton Head Island, SC 

Spencer Fotsch 2015 

Sausalito, CA 

Ernest Edward Fowler 2015 

Cowpens, SC 

Sarah Jane Fox 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

James Armand Fradette 2015 

Herndon, VA 




258 



a 



Underclassman Portraits 




William Marcus Franzreb 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Chase Kiner Freeman 2015 

Mount Pleasant SC 

Nicholas Freeman 2015 

Ponte Vedra Beach, FL 

Stephen Daniel Fry 2015 

Pendleton. SC 

Meining Catherine Fu 2015 

Greer, SC 

Shannon Marisa Fulk 2015 

Mechanicsville, VA 

Bryson Davis Fuller 2015 

Florence. SC 

Gary Lamont Fulmore Jr 2015 

Lake City, SC 

Trevor Stephen Funderburk 2015 

Myrtle Beach, SC 

Lindsay Kay Fugua 2015 

Greenwood, SC 

Richard Hamilton Gadsden 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Paige Lauren Gainey 2015 

Charleston, SC 



- 



**m 




Underclassman Portraits I ' H259 



- 



Underclassmen 



Kevin Patrick Gale 2015 

Alpharetfa, GA 

Vanessa Nancy Galeno 2015 

Pelzer, SC 

Christine Mary Galligan 2015 

Millersville. MD 

Kelsey Auburn Gallman 2015 

Greenwood. SC 

Jenifer Leigh Galloway 2014 

Walhalla SC 

Robert Brisbane Gambel 2015 

New Orleans, LA 

Chelsey Louise Gambrell 2015 

Pendleton, SC 

Christian Gantt 2014 

Gilbert, SC 

Cristina Raquel Garcia 2015 

North Potomac, MD 

Victoria Kathryn Gardner 2015 

North Augusta, SC 

Whitney Elizabeth Garland 2015 

Walhalla, SC 

Reena Gonzales Garma 2015 

Manning, SC 




260 



Underclassman Porrraits 




Hayden Todd Garrett 2015 

Easley, SC 

Ian Matthew Garrett 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Lillian Bartlett Garrison 2015 

Pendleton, SC 

William Matthew Garrison 2015 

Anderson, SC 

John Joseph Garstka 2014 

Springfield, VA 

Brian Harrison Gavin 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Ian Michael Gayman 2015 

Shippensburg, PA 

Caleb Michael George 2015 

Blythewood, SC 

Logan Germann 2014 

Bluffton. SC 

Alec Wilton Gibson 2013 

Greer. SC 

Devin Elizabeth Gibson 2015 

Greer, SC 

Timothy Curtis Gibson Jr 2015 

Sumter, SC 

Katherine Elizabeth Giles 2015 

Gilbert, SC 

Kevin Shaw Gillard 2015 

Gaithersburg, MD 

David Eugene Gillespie 2013 

Greer, SC 

Kathleen Gillespie 2014 

Greer, SC 

Kristen Michaela Gillette 2015 

North Charleston, SC 

Sara Catherine Gilliam 2014 

Spartanburg, SC 

Sarah Katherine Gilliam 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Michelle Elaine Gilroy 2015 

West Chester, PA 

Dante Anthony Giovagnoli 2015 

Murrells Inlet, SC 

Dominic Paul Giovagnoli 2015 

Murrells Inlet SC 

William Walter Glasgow 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Joshua Mcknight Glenn 2014 

Sumter, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



261 



Underclassmen 



Mike Glenn 2014 

The Woodlands, TX 

Benjamin Harry Glover 2015 

Eutawville, SC 

Michael James Glynn 2015 

Yard ley, PA 

Westley Clark Godfrey 2014 

Arden, NC 

Gina Nicole Goff 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Joseph Bentson Gollinger 2015 

Naperville, IL 

Martin Gonzalez 2015 

Summerville, SC 

Austin Christopher Goode 2015 

Florence, SC 

Brock Nicholas Goodling 2015 

Mount Union, PA 

Samuel Brooks Goodman 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Katelyn Elizabeth Goretzke 2015 

Dublin, OH 

Conrad James Gorman 2015 

Cary, NC 

Meegian Alicia Gossard 2014 

Aiken. SC 

Erin Michelle Gottlieb 2015 

Greenwood, SC 

Bricole Tysheema Graham 2015 

Lake City, SC 

Victoria Alexandrea Joyc Graham 2015 

Central, SC 

Kelly Frances Gramlich 2015 

Austin. TX 

William Nichols Granbery 2015 

Nashville, TN 

Daniel Conner Grant 2013 

Moncks Corner, SC 

Jacy Rochelle Grant 2015 

Easley, SC 

JaquanasC. Grant 2015 

Hampton, SC 

Caroline Gray 2015 

Liberty, SC 

Mabry Alexandra Gray 2014 

Myrtle Beach, SC 

Margaret Raye Greagan 2013 

Seneca SC 




262 



Ji 



Underclassman Portraits 




Frances Eugenia Green 2013 

Lynchburg, SC 

Katherine Renee Green 2015 

Columbia SC 

Michael Christian Green 2013 

Clemson, SC 

Joshua Harrison Greene 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Lee William Greene 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Katherine Jayne Greenslit 2015 

Summerville, SC 

Jesse Dylan Gregory 2015 

Seneca, SC 

David Wesley Griffith 2015 

Aiken. SC 

Kyle David Grissen 2015 

Potomac, MD 

Emily Lynn Groce 2015 

Houston. TX 

Emily Elena Grom 2015 

Charlotte, NC 

Megan Elizabeth Grosvenor 2015 

Moore, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



1263 



Underclassmen 



ColtGrunsky 2014 

Lexington, SC 

Benjamin Thomas Guerry 2013 

Mt Pleasant, SC 

Connor Daniel Guess 2015 

Denmark, SC 

Katelyn Paige Guest 2013 

Hamstead, NH 

Mallory Aren Guffey 2015 

Gastonia, NC 

Kayla Danielle Gulley 2015 

Pawleys island, SC 

Robert Steven Gunter 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Brandon Gwinn 2014 

Spartanburg, SC 

Jeanni Lynn Haas 2013 

Easley, SC 

Scott Daniel Haas 2015 

Longwood, FL 

Amber Lee Hackler 2015 

Western Springs, IL 

Whitney Rebecca Hafford 2013 

Sharon, CT 

Nicolai Sebastian Haftmann 2015 

Fredericksburg, VA 

Crosby Elizabeth Haile 2015 

Warrenton, VA 

Jonathan Lee Haines 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Nathaniel Austin Haines 2015 

Seneca SC 

Fatema Ayub Hakimji 2014 

West Columbia, SC 

Alexandra Elizabeth Hale 2015 A 

Greer, SC M 

Charles Tyler Hale 2015 £ 

Manning, SC ^K 

Ashley Lim Haley 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Garrett Joseph Hall 2015 

Smoaks, SC 

Michael George Hall 2015 

Mount Pleasant SC 

Sara Elizabeth Hall 2014 

Fort Mill, SC 

Benjamin Joseph Halula 2015 

Raleigh, NC 



264 



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Underclassman Portraits 





Travis Ham 2014 

Seneca, SC 

Jamora Anice Hamilton 2015 

Blythewood, SC 

Mark Tanner Hamilton 2015 

Brentwood, TN 

Ann Lawrence Hammond 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Emily Katherine Hammond 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Jason Andrew Hammond 2015 

North Charleston, SC 

Nicholas Walker Hammond 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Shaelyn Nicole Hammond 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Carl Wayne Hance 2013 

Blythewood, SC 

Chris William George Hance 2015 

Blythewood, SC 

Ryan Michael Haney 2015 

Houston, TX 

Ashley Nicole Hanna 2015 

Lake City, SC 

Michael John Hansen 2015 

Moore, SC 

Andrew Jay Hanson 2015 

Knoxville, TN 

Grace Alexandra Hanson 2015 

Fletcher, NC 

Randi Blair Hardin 2013 

Greenville, SC 

Kevin Christopher Hardjono 2015 

Decatur, GA 

Rayphael Sebastian Hardy 2015 

Chapin. SC 

Anne Keelan Harmon 2015 

Asheville, NC 

Ansley Marie Harmon 2015 

West Columbia, SC 

Nicholas Scott Harmon 2015 

Blythewood, SC 

Rebecca Ann Harmon 2013 

Goose Creek, SC 

Taylor Layne Harmon 2015 

Saluda, SC 

Drew Alexander Harper 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



■1265 



Underclassmen 



Julia Kristen Harper 2015 

Oviedo, FL 

Meredith Christine Harper 2013 

North Augusta SC 

Nicole Marie Harper 2015 

Scituate, MA 

Colleen Elizabeth Harris 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Jena Delane Harris 2015 

Graniteville, SC 

Joshua Obadiah Harrison 2015 

Rowlett, TX 

Michael John Harrison 2015 

Knoxville, TN 

Dion Tremain Harry 2015 

Lynchburg, SC 

Thomas Joseph Hastie 2015 

Myrtle Beach, SC 

Blake Carlisle Hawsey 2015 

Columbia SC 

Danielle Marie Hayden 2015 

Severna Park, MD 

Theodore Ogden Hays 2015 

Greenville, SC 




266 



■1 



Underclassman Portraits 




Katherine Lee Hazlewood 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Matthew Macfarlane Heacox 2015 

Spartanburg, SC 

Meredith Christina Head 2014 

Greenville, SC 

Rachel Suzanne Hebden 2015 

Annapolis, MD 

Michael Baily Heberton 2015 

Greer, SC 

Katharine Corianna Hehn 2015 

Summerville, SC 

Michaela Ryanne Heil 2015 

San Diego, CA 

Christopher Douglas Helber 2015 

Weston, FL 

Arthur Coleman Hellyer 2015 

Spartanburg, SC 

Zachary Evan Helmlinger 2015 

York, SC 

Lauren Emily Hemmingsen 2015 

Tega Cay, SC 

Jacob Henderson 2014 

Spartanburg, SC 

Katelyn Elizabeth Henry 2015 

Seneca SC 

Tori Amber Heritier 2015 

Destin, FL 

Courtney Downing Herlocker 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Jonathan Wilson Herlong 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Jessica Marie Heron 2015 

Irmo, SC 

Parker Marie Herring 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Coleman Matthew Heustess 2014 

Darlington, SC 

Callie Elizabeth Heyne 2015 

Mt Pleasant, SC 

Grace Katherine Heyne 2015 

Mt Pleasant, SC 

Robert Moffett Hie key 2015 

Atlanta, GA 

James Alexander Hicklin 2015 

Clemson, SC 

Shaquille Devon Hightower 2015 

Bath, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



1267 



Underclassmen 



Leah Marie Hildreth 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Andrew Powell Hill 2015 

Chapin, SC 

Jayla Jecol Hill 2015 

Spartanburg, SC 

Joshua Glen Hill 2015 

Pendleton, SC 

Patrick Glen Hill 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Michelle Eileen Hillenius 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Matthew Duncan Hilton 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Elizabeth Ann Himes 2015 

Okatie, SC 

Joy Guro Himmelsbach 2015 

Myrtle Beach, SC 

Akevian Hinton 2014 

Rock Hill, SC 

Tameshia Laderricka Hinton 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Stephen Brandon Hiott 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Kendal Kay Hobbs 2015 

Fort Mill, SC 

Annemarie Merrill Hodgson 2015 

Kensington, MD 

Ciara Michelle Hoehne 2015 

Johns Creek, GA 

Josef Lee Hofer 2015 

Coral Springs, FL 

Nicole Frances Hoffman 2013 

Myrtle Beach, SC 

Karli Melissa Hogsed 2013 

Central, SC 

Lauren Kelsey Holden 2015 

Johnson City, TN 

Linden Eve Holder 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Ryan Jeffrey Holdren 2015 

Westminster, SC 

Alexis Jane Holland 2015 

Lilburn, GA 

Kendrick Cullen Holland 2015 

Clemson, SC 

Mckenzie Holland 2014 

Saint Matthews, SC 




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Underclassman Portraits 




Craig Edward Holliday 2014 

Central, SC 

Chelsea Elizabeth Hopland 2015 

Johnson City, 77V 

Devante Aaron Home 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Nicole Lillian Horth 2015 

Sudbury, MA 

Timothy Luke Horton 2015 

Warwick, NY 

Ashleigh Nicole Hough 2015 

Kershaw, SC 

Charles Alexander Houston 2015 

Easley, SC 

Cody Dane Houston 2015 

Little River, SC 

Matthew Martin Houston 2015 

Summerville, SC 

Thomas Bradford Hovermale 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Michael Christopher Howard 2015 

Sarasota, FL 

Christopher James Howell 2015 

Hollywood, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



■0269 



Underclassmen 



MM. B. KELLER -GEN*L MDSE. 



Sherwin-Williams 
PAINTS 



James Howell 2014 

Johnsonville, SC 

Michael Howell 2014 

Florence, SC 

Shaun Jeffrey Hoyt 2015 

Largo, FL 

Amanda Rae Hrubesh 2013 

Lilburn, GA 

James Huckabee 2014 

Beaufort, SC 

Caroline Rigby Hudson 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Devon James Hudson 2015 

Graniteville, SC 

Kaitlyn Brooke Huffstetler 2015 

Gastonia, NC 

Haley Elizabeth Huggins 2015 

Bedford, MA 

Brian Michael Hughes 2015 

Liberty, SC 

Hannah Katherine Hughes 2015 

Roebuck, SC 

Lisa Mary Hughes 2013 

Daniel Island, SC 



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Underclassman Portraits 





Brendan Lawrence Hungerford 2015 

Albany, NY 
Carly Darlene Hunt 2015 

Springfield, IL 
James Coleman Hunter 2015 

Lexington, SC 
Mccready Ellen Hunter 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Austin Joseph Hurst 2015 

Vienna, VA 

Jake Hutchinson 2014 

Irmo, SC 

Theresa Burns Hutto 2015 

Sumter, SC 

Derek Robert Hutton 2014 

Cayce, SC 

Franklin Floyd Hyre 2015 

Alexandria, VA 

Jesse Daniel lassogna 2015 

Guilford, CT 

Alexander James Incao 2015 

Bridgewater, NJ 

Brooke Nichole Ingram 2015 

Fountain Inn, SC 

Carleigh Michelle Isbell 2015 

Knoxville, TN 

Casey Richard Izard 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Albert Jacks 2013 

Clinton, SC 

Isaac Leary Jacks 2015 

Clinton, SC 

Emma Grace Jackson 2015 

Upper Saddle River, NJ 

Hudson Taylor Jackson 2015 

Conway, SC 

Melissa Anne Jackson 2015 

Moncks Corner, SC 

Sarah Diane Jackson 2013 

Jacksonville, FL 

Joseph Carter Jacobs 2015 

Greenville, SC 

AmitJain 2015 

Charlotte, NC 

Nicholas Scott James 2015 

Greer, SC 

William Devant James 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



271 



Underclassmen 



Jennifer Anne Jameson 2013 

Columbia SC 

Colton Allen Jamieson 2015 

Greer, SC 

Jonathan Taylor Jamieson 2015 

Chapel Hill. NC 

Jane Danielle Jansen 2015 

Cornelius, NC 

Matthew Louis Jarrell 2015 

Inman, SC 

Kelly Lee Jeanes 2013 

Belton, SC 

Laura Justine Jegers-Hayes 2015 

Roswell, GA 

Charmaine Jenkins 2015 

Columbia. SC 

Joye Patrice Jenkins 2015 

Pamplico, SC 

David Bryan Jennings 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Emily Sarah Jensen 2015 

Vienna, VA 

Alixandra Faye Johns 2015 

Westminster, SC 

Amber Chenise Johnson 2015 

Kingstree, SC 

Casey Alexander Johnson 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Claire Boehmer Johnson 2015 

Florence, AL 

Margaret Hoke Johnson 2014 

Charlotte, NC 

Morgan Lee Johnson 2014 

Chapin, SC 

Rachel Emily Johnson 2015 

Kingsport, TN 

Tabitha Sue Johnson 2015 

Lebanon, TN 

William Boone Johnson 2014 

Athens, GA 

William Kenneth Johnson 2015 

Moncks Corner, SC 

Christopher Matthew Jolley 2015 

Matthews, NC 

Kara Michele Jolly 2015 

Merrimack, NH 

Courtney Nicole Jones 2015 

Summerville, SC 




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David Yates Jones 2015 

Niceville, FL 

Haley Ann Jones 2015 

Overland Park, KS 

Hannah Patricia Jones 2015 

York, SC 

Katherine Elizabeth Jones 2015 

Columbus, OH 

Randall Jones 2014 

Campobello, SC 

Samuel Mcdonald Jones 2015 

Florence, SC 

Jonathon Edward Josephson 2015 

Aiken. SC 

Jon Harrison Josey 2013 

Florence. SC 

Carson Lee Joye 2015 

Columbia. SC 

Emily Lynn Judd 2015 

Aiken. SC 

Katie Rachel Justice 2015 

Springfield, SC 

Jennifer Renee Kahler 2014 

Gilbert, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



1273 



Underclassmen 



Alyx Madison Kahn 2015 

Waxhaw, NC 

Alexis Hutnick Kaiser 2015 

Omaha, ME 

Frank Alex Kalany 2015 

Marietta, GA 

Erin Elizabeth Kaminsky 2015 

West Friendship, MD 

Ian Daniel Kaplan 2015 

Allendale, NJ 

Leif Andrew Kays 2015 

Gadsden, SC 

Olivia Anna Keane 2015 

Richmond, VA 

Connor Cloudman Keating 2015 

Herndon, VA 

Joseph Patrick Keightley 2015 

San Francisco, CA 
Christopher Nottingham Keith 20 1 5 

Campobello, SC 
Megan Page Kelley 2015 

Daniel Island, SC 
Jacob Sean Kelliher 2015 

Sammamish, WA 




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Underclassman Portraits 




Matthew Anthony Kelly 2015 

Pendleton, SC 

Lindsay Gray Kendall 2015 

San Diego, CA 

Sarah Elizabeth Kendrick 2013 

Aiken, SC 

Allison Rebecca Kennamer 2013 

Beech Island, SC 

Shannon Ruth Kenneally 2015 

Circleville, NY 

Sara Kennedy 2014 

Donalds, SC 

Shelly Elizabeth Kennerly 2015 

Williston, SC 

Heather Renee Keown 2015 

Canton, GA 

Jordan Nicole Kersse 2013 

Folly Beach, SC 

Taylor Steven Kimmett 2015 

Ridgeway, SC 

Allen Preston King 2014 

North Augusta, SC 

Elizabeth Grace King 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Georgia Leigh King 2014 

Raleigh, NC 

Amethyst Morgan Kipling 2015 

Greer, SC 

Michael Kirkendale-Haak 2014 

Seneca SC 

Brian Theodore Kirkland 2015 

Landenberg, PA 

Caid Mccullough Kirven 2015 

Darlington, SC 

Leland Joel Kleger 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Nadiya Klep 2015 

Liberty, SC 

Olivia Kay Kluesener 2015 

Spartanburg, SC 

Dalton Altas Knight 2015 

Union, SC 

Larissa Ann Knight 2015 

Tucson, AZ 

Maghan Rebekah Knight 2013 

Pageland. SC 

Matthew Christopher Koch 2015 

Cary, NC 



Underclassman Portraits 



1275 



Underclassmen 



Carson Ann Kohler 2014 

St Petersburg, FL 

Rebecca Jean Kohler 2015 

Easley, SC 

Taylor Alexander Koonts 2015 

Gaffney, SC 

Kaitlyn Elizabeth Kowalski 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Jacob Scott Kozacki 2015 

Florence, SC 

Stefan Jerome Kozacki 2015 

Florence, SC 

Marissa Jo Kozma 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Clarice Lynn Krause 2015 

Charlotte, NC 

Colin Andrew Kuserk 2015 

Derwood, MD 

Lawrence John Lacerte 2015 

Dallas, TX 

Ashli Nicol Lagaly 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Jake Stryker Laird 2015 

Mt Pleasant, SC 

Katherine Grace Lalla 2015 

Lancaster, SC 

William Greyson Land 2015 

Seneca SC 

Paul Nathanael Landeene 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Stephen Wayne Landeene 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Samuel Casey Landreth 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Rachel Glenna Lane 2015 

Inman, SC 

William David Lane 2015 

Florence, SC 

Faith Allison Langdale 2015 

Myrtle Beach, SC 

Mackenzie Brooks Langston 2015 

Greer, SC 

Patrick James Lannan 2015 

Columbus, IN 

Miguel Santiago Larrain 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Benjamin Elliott Lassiter 2015 

Florence, SC 




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Underclassman Portraits 




Deion Vanshelton Latimer 2015 

Belton, SC 

Ashley Caroline Lawson 2015 

Chapin, SC 

Christopher Chase Lawson 2014 

Windham, NH 

Evan Timothy Lawson 2015 

Spartanburg, SC 

Sarah Caroline Lawson 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Zachary David Lawton 2015 

Lake Wylie, SC 

William Michael Layden 2015 

Western Springs, IL 

Carolyn Louise Lazzari 2015 

Georgetown, SC 

Allison Brooke Leach 2015 

Greer, SC 

Britnee Nicole Leathers 2015 

Waldorf, MD 

William Alexander Lecompte 2015 

Evanston, IL 

Sterling Prescot Lecy 2015 

Lexington, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



wA 



Underclassmen 



Morris Branchell Lee 2015 

West Chester, PA 

Robin Olym Lee 2015 

Irmo, SC 

Wang Victor Lee 2015 

Clemson, SC 

Jamison Samuel Legrand 2015 

Irmo. SC 

William Gregory Lehne 2015 

Greer, SC 

Eric Jeffrey Lehr 2015 

Saint Louis, MO 

Allison Rebecca Leisgang 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Jillian Marie Leisgang 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Jeffrey Winston Leister 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Clayton William Lemasters 2015 

Maitland, FL 

Cameron David Lemere 2015 

Easley, SC 

Erin Michelle Leonard 2015 

Easley, SC 




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Underclassman Portraits 




Benjamin Tillman Leppard 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Grace Elizabeth Lewallen 2015 

Florence, SC 

Abby Terese Lewis 2015 

Tega Cay, SC 

Jason Charles Lewis 2015 

Venetia, PA 

Patrick Connor Lewis 2015 

Auburn, AL 

Rebecca Victoria Lewit 2015 

Redwood City, CA 

David Andrew Limbaugh 2015 

Fort Mill. SC 

Caitlin Alexandra Lindberg 2015 

Fort Mill, SC 

Nathan Lindler 2014 

South Glastonbury, CT 
Kyle Gainor Lindsey 2015 

Charlotte, NC 
Robert Lee Lipsey 2015 

Hanahan, SC 
Carter Cunningham Lister 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Caleb Reese Little 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Jennifer Paige Little 014 

Aiken. SC 

Katie Elizabeth Little 2015 

Mt Pleasant. SC 

Michael Jerome Littlejohn 2015 

Gaffney, SC 

Nicholas P. Liu 2015 

Lexington. SC 

Jordan Allan Livingston 2015 

Charleston. SC 

Mary Katherine Livingston 2015 

//•ma SC 

Lawson Thierolf Lloyd 2015 

Latta. SC 

Perry Jonathan Loftis 2015 

Starr. SC 

Eric Christopher Lollis 2015 

Lexington. VA 

Bryan London 2014 

Mt Pleasant. SC 

Kenneth William Long 2013 

Clover, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



1279 



Underclassmen 



Willis Long 2013 

Goose Creek, SC 

Averi Nandalyn Looper 2014 

Rock Hill, SC 

Sarah Catherine Looper 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Zia Argavon Loffi 2015 

Clemson, SC 

Inman Lee Love 2015 

Gaffney, SC 

Hayden William Lovette 2015 

Hilton Head Island, SC 

Whitney Michelle Lowery 2015 

Anderson. SC 

Danielle Cozette Lubin 2015 

Great Falls, VA 

Zane Alden Lycke 2015 

Mt Pleasant, SC 

Robert Jackson Lyerly 2015 

Destin, FL 

James Mabry 2014 

Spartanburg, SC 

Wallace Glenn Mack 2015 

Salters, SC 

Alyssa Marie Mackey 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Leila Margaret Mackie 2013 

Gastonia, NC 

Christopher Edward Macon 2015 

Towson, MD 

Susannah Paige Macon 2015 

Bolivar, TN 

Andrew Bennett Maddox 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Monica Maria Espia Magcalas 2015 

Ladson, SC 

Kara Kathleen Maher 2015 

Brentwood, TN 

Frank Weston Mahon 2015 

Florence, SC 

Julia Kathleen Malitoris 2015 

Raleigh. NC 

Katie Beth Mamanus 2013 

Greenwood, SC 

Sara Ann Manesiotis 2015 

Hilton Head Island, SC 

Robert Perry Mangum 2015 

Lexington, SC 




280 



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Underclassman Portraits 




Meghan Mcclain Manley 2015 

Southampton, NY 

Grace Elizabeth Mann 2015 

Charlotte, NC 

John Bennett Manna 2015 

Mullica Hill, NJ 

Elliott Dickson Mappus 2013 

Charleston, SC 

Marissa Ann Marinelli 2015 

Monroe Twp, NJ 

Kathryn Elizabeth Markferding 2014 

Florham Park, NJ 

Emily Rae Marks 2014 

Rock Hill, SC 

Kourtney Noel Maron 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Jesus Manuel Marguez 2015 

Blacksburg, SC 
Spencer Reid Marsh 2015 

Chapin, SC 
Cynthia Marie Marshall 2013 

Rock Hill. SC 
Michael Lee Marshall 2013 

Rock Hill, SC 



Underclassman Portraits I I 281 



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Underclassmen 



Sean Alejandro Marshall 2015 

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 

Chandler Marie Martin 2015 

Pamplico, SC 

Emmet Francis Martin 2015 

Taylors, SC 

Hayley Annette Martin 2015 

Pendleton, SC 

John Tyler Martin 2015 

Winston Salem, NC 

Justin William Martin 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Kevin Robert Martin 2015 

Youngsville, NC 

Kristen Elizabeth Martin 2013 

Wellington, FL 

Samantha Siena Martin 2015 

Cincinnati, OH 

Peter John Marvin 2015 

Fort Mill, SC 

Taylor Mason 2014 

Beaufort, SC 

Ryan Eric Massenburg 2013 

Statesville, NC 




282 



Underclassman Portraits 




Kacie Madison Match 2015 

Dublin, OH 

Meghan Ashley Matlack 2015 

Columbia SC 

Laura Lee Matney 2015 

Cayce, SC 

Gerard Paul Mattaliano 2015 

Marsh field, MA 

Corey Mark Matthews 2015 

Coward, SC 

Sumter Elizabeth Matthews 2015 

Blythewood, SC 

Wesley Hall Matthews 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Emily Grace Mattison 2015 

Spartanburg, SC 

Jocelyn Maturo 2015 

Wyckoff, NJ 
Carlie Danielle Maute 2014 

Charleston, SC 
Georgia Presley May 2015 

Tallahassee, FL 
Courtney Michell Mayer 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Tyson William Mayers 2015 

Rehoboth Beach, DE 

Creg Nathan McAda 2015 

Cleveland, SC 

Franklin Ott McAlhany 2015 

Branchville, SC 

Rustin Harry McAlister 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Justin Brett McAllister 2015 

Greenwood, SC 

Marissa Noelle McaAmis 2015 

Simpsonville. SC 

Cody Sheppard McArdle 2015 

Bluffton, SC 

Jacob Thomas McCanless 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Elizabeth Alden McCants 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Kellen Michael McClain 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Jeremy Ethan McClayton 2015 

Columbia, MD 

Patrick Scott McClelland 2015 

Columbia, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



1283 



Underclassmen 



Zachary Albert McClelland 2015 

Watkinsville, GA 

Kaitlin Yvonne McClure 2015 

Reevesville, SC 

Meredith Ann McConnell 2015 

Sandy Springs, GA 

Kathleen Elizabeth McCord 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Lauren Travea McCorkle 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Leah Suzanne McCormick 2015 

Franklin, 77V 

Delaney Brown McCraw 2015 

Gaffney, SC 

Maya Alexandria McCray 2015 

West Columbia, SC 

David Lelen McCullough 2015 

Whitmire, SC 

Matthew Copeland McCullough 2014 

Lyman, SC 

Kirstin Elizabeth McCutchan 20 1 5 

Blythewood, SC 

Katherine Lee McDaniel 2015 

Mt Pleasant, SC 



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Underclassman Portraits 




Fowler Scott McDonald 2013 

North Augusta, SC 

Kevin McDonald 2015 

Goose Creek, SC 

Meghan Elizabeth McDonough 2015 

Simpsonville. SC 

Larissa Lanise McDowell 2013 

Lake City, SC 

Shedonia Marlequaya McDowell-Curren.2014 

Gastonia, NC 

Ryan Gregory McElhannon 2014 

Honea Path, SC 

Jesse Adam McGee 2015 

Pageland, SC 

Sean James McGlumphy 2014 

Inman, SC 

Kevin Larkin McGowan 2015 

Shaker Heights, OH 

Joseph John McGrail 2015 

Downingtown, PA 

Kathleen Elizabeth McGreevey 2015 

Jonesborough. TN 

Alexander Michael McHale 2015 

Mount Pleasant. SC 

John Duncan Mcintosh 2015 

Berlin, MD 

Lauren Paige Mclntyre 2015 

Spartanburg, SC 

Allison Renee McKee 2015 

Greeneville, TN 

Alexander Seabrook McKellar 2015 

Mount Pleasant. SC 

Andrew Sanderson McKellar 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Kevin John McKeown 2015 

Baldwin, MD 

Tanner James McLellan 2015 

Columbia. SC 

Elizabeth Mae McLeod 2015 

Kinards. SC 

William Brockman McLeod 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Alexander Raymond McMillan 2015 

Myrtle Beach. SC 

William Maxwell McMullan 2015 

Salem. SC 

Erin Teresa McMurtry 2015 

Lutz, FL 



Underclassman Portraits 



1285 



Underclassmen 



Emily Harrison Mead 2015 

Mendham, NJ 

Pamela Sloane Medley 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

John David Meeder 2015 

Bluffton, SC 

Kevin Daniel Meeks 2014 

Myrtle Beach, SC 

Hannah Mercer 2014 

Fort Mill. SC 

Steven Mitchell Mets 2015 

Aiken. SC 

Jacob Charles Michaelis 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Katherine Elizabeth Mierek 2015 

Spartanburg, SC 

Makenzie Alexis Mikesell 2015 

Elkridge, MD 

Devin Tyler Miles 2015 

Sumter, SC 

Anna Kathryn Miller 2015 

Mukilteo, WA 

Richard Eugene Miller 2015 

Central, SC 

Sarah Rose Miller 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Taryn Marie Miller 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Taylor Stockton Miller 2015 

Fort Mill, SC 

Calley Anita Mills 2015 

Chesnee, SC 

Levi Thomas Mills 2015 

Watkinsville, GA 

Rachael Anna Mitchell 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Michael Charles Mitchem 2015 

Greenville, SC 

De'Harion Lee Mobley 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Deanna Theresa Mock 2015 

Sylvania, GA 

Nicole Modica 2015 

Marblehead, MA 

Austin Waddell Mogy 2015 

Florence, SC 

John Patrick Mohan 2015 

Marietta, GA 




286 



Underclassman Portraits 




Sandra Nicole Mokalled 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Coleman Sutton Monroe 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Patrick Devin Monroe 2015 

Summerville, SC 

Matthew Alan Monteith 2014 

Clover. SC 

William Brian Moody 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Conner Lee Moon 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Brandon Moore 2013 

Lancaster, SC 

Colin Michael Moore 2015 

Mt Pleasant, SC 

Kyle Allan Moore 2015 

Prosperity, SC 

Nekedra Sade Moore 2015 

Early Branch, SC 

Andrew Michael Morelli 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Michael Stephen Morgan 2013 

Pickens, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



1287 



Underclassmen 



Andrew Grayson Morris 2015 

Inman, SC 

Graham Robert Morris 2015 

Greer, SC 

Jacob Allen Morrison 2015 

Blyfhewood, SC 

MaCaulay Taylor Morrison 2015 

Winston Salem, NC 

Rachel Alena Morrison 2015 

Oak Ridge, TN 

Zachary Robert Moser 2013 

Trumbull, CT 

Timothy Patrick Moses 2015 

Laurens, SC 

Paul Matthews Mosher 2015 

Watkinsville, GA 

Dakota Heath Mosley 2015 

Varnville, SC 

Julia Lois Moss 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Aaron Brian Mosteller 2015 

Greer, SC 

Caroline Grace Mosteller 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 




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Underclassman Portraits 




Tessa Day Moxley 2015 

Mountain Rest, SC 

Savannah Leigh Mozingo 2015 

Mount Pleasant SC 

Casey Scott Mueller 2015 

Silver Spring, MD 

Mackenzie Lee-Ellen Mullikin 2015 

Pendleton, SC 

Laura Katherine Mullin 2015 

Brentwood, TN 

Gregory Robert Mumford 2015 

Haddonfield, NJ 

Stacy Marie Mundy 2015 

Abbeville, SC 

Cole Garner Murbach 2013 

Windermere, FL 

Kayla Dell Murdaugh 2014 

Smoaks, SC 
Douglas John O'Hagan Murphy 2015 

Alexandria, VA 
Jaelyn Briana Murphy 2015 

Indian Trail, NC 
Roy Murphy 2014 

Darlington, SC 

James Joseph Murray 2015 

Califon, NJ 

Lauren Michele Muscatell 2015 

Lake Wylie, SC 

Cary Lynn Nabors 2015 

Aiken. SC 

Taylor Naquin 2013 

Greenville, SC 

Mark Neese 2015 

Greer. SC 

Charles Edward Neidenbach 2015 

Spartanburg, SC 

John Matthew Nelson 2015 

Woodruff, SC 

Victoria Reid Nelson 2015 

Greer, SC 

Donald Robert Nesbitt 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Brandon Nettles 2014 

Hardeeville, SC 

Phelan Phillip Neumann 2015 

Ladson, SC 

Landen Marie Nevergoll 2015 

Columbia. SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



u 



289 



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Underclassmen 



Rebecca Grace Newman 2015 

Fort Mill, SC 

Brittany Newsome 2014 

Simpsonville, SC 

Christopher John Newton 2015 

Salem, SC 

Terrika Adaeze Ngobili 2015 

Piedmont, SC 

Haider Ali Niazi 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Alexander Morton Nickell 2015 

Mt Pleasant, SC 

Alexander Charles Nigro 2015 

Clemson, SC 

Jacob Michael Nix 2015 

Williston, SC 

Sarah Rebecca Nix 2015 

Gramling, SC 

Kemis Ann Noble 2013 

Manakin Sabot, VA 

Matthew Paul Noland 2015 

Orlando, FL 

Dylan Thomas Roddy Normandin 2015 

Rancho Santa Margarita, CA 

Kelly F. Norris 2015 

Far Hills, NJ 

Kelsey Anne Norris 2015 

Travelers Rest, SC 

Sommer Dawn Norris 2014 

Conway, SC 

Tyler James Notaro 2015 

Pittsford, NY 

Caitlin Elizabeth Null 2015 

Greensboro, NC 

Taylor Young Nunamaker 2013 

Greenwood, SC 

Cassandra Marie Nutini 2015 

Hoffman Estates, IL 

Jonathan Gardner Oakley 2015 

Woodruff, SC 

Kaitlyn Marie Oaks 2015 

Greer, SC 

Robert T. O'Brien 2014 

Goose Creek, SC 

Emily Katharine Oconnor 2015 

Myrtle Beach, SC 

Thurston Otto James Odom 2015 

Bamberg, SC 




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Underclassman Portraits 




Heather Gwendolyn Oliver 2015 

Hilton Head Island, SC 

Caroline Carrington Olson 2015 

Greensboro, NC 

Joshua Haines Olson 2015 

Greer, SC 

Natalie Susan Olson 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Chiderah Onyeukwu 2015 

Dacula, GA 

Rory O'Rourke 2015 

Manalapan, NJ 

Neal Joseph Osullivan 2015 

Hartsville, SC 

Kimberley Meghan Owen 2015 

Knoxville, TN 

Nicole Leanne Owens 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Ryan Aldridge Owens 2015 

Alpharetta, GA 

Tyler Kent Owens 2015 

Boiling Springs, SC 

Cody Alta Padget 2015 

Lynchburg, TN 



Underclassman Portraits I I 291 



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Underclassmen 



Joseph Francis Painter 2015 

Greer, SC 

Barrington Michael Pandy 2015 

Boiling Springs, SC 

Grayson Banks Panetti 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Blakely Mattison Parker 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Rabon Arthur Parker 2015 

Lake City, SC 

Chelsea Irene Partain 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Scott Grant Pasco 2015 

Blyfhewood, SC 

Daniel Chandler Pasker 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Zachary Aaron Paskoff 2015 

Baltimore, MD 

Stephen Chandler Patch 2015 , 

North Attleboro, MA 

Kunal Trushit Patel 2015 

Seneca, SC 

Milap Rajendra Patel 2015 

Anderson, SC 




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Underclassman Portraits 




Zeel Hiren Patel 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Brian D. Patriarca 2015 

Bordentown, NJ 

Thomas Connor Pavelka 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Emilee Brooke Payne 2013 

Simpsonville, SC 

Kathryn Jo Payne 2014 

Irmo, SC 

Isaac Anthony Pearson 2015 

Summerville, SC 

Jacklyn Renee Pearson 2015 

Daniel Island, SC 

Lauren Renee Pearson 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Katherine Alexander Peden 2015 

Cameron, SC 

Robert Bradley Pedigo 2015 

Lewes, DE 

Kathleen Angele Peek 2015 

Baton Rouge, LA 

Wenhao Pei 2015 

Boyds, MD 

Erin Danielle Peifer 2015 

Ladson, SC 

David Austin Pelle 015 

Fletcher, NC 

Melita Lois Pena 2013 

Fairfax, VA 

Gary Douglas Pence 2015 

Fort Mill, SC 

Sarah Elizabeth Pence 2015 

Fort Mill, SC 

Douglas Ivon Pender 2015 

Winnsboro, SC 

Jake Andrew Perry 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Rachel Elizabeth Perry 2015 

Saluda, SC 

Elisabeth Alice Peters 2014 

Clemson, SC 

Brian David Peterson 2015 

Fort Mill, SC 

Patrick Joseph Petrone 2015 

Brielle, NJ 

Lynn My Phan 2015 

Greer, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



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293 



Underclassmen 



Trungnhan Tong Phan 2015 

Sumter, SC 

Angelica Karena Phillips 2013 

Cheraw, SC 

Katherine Elizabeth Phillips 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Madison Lynn Phillips 2015 

Mt Pleasant SC 

Stephanie Michelle Phillips 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Tyler Avery Phillips 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Hopeellen Philpot 2014 

Greenville, SC 

Qui'Ara Marie Philson 2014 

Simpsonville, SC 

Kyle Michael Pilgrim 2015 

Easley, SC 

Georgianna Marie Pisano-Goetz 2015 

Frederick, MD 

Spyridoula Georgia Pisteolis 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Matthew Reed Pizzuti 2015 

Florence, SC 

Quintera Plair 2014 

Columbia, SC 

Alexander Mack Pogue 2015 

Dallas, TX 

Marissa Lynn Pollanen 2015 

Summerville, SC 

Kathryn Lee Polo 2015 

New Bern, NC 

Lauren Elizabeth Popovich 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Jacklyn Maye Porter 2015 

Lebanon, NJ 

Katherine Nancy Poston 2014 

Hodges, SC 

Madison Victoria Potts 2015 

Clemson, SC 

Charles T. Powell 2013 

Pageland, SC 

Erica Leeann Powell 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Hunter Charles Powell 2015 

Gaithersburg, MD 

Erica Brooke Powers 2015 

Lancaster, SC 




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Underclassman Portraits 




Robert Quay Powers 2015 

Greer, SC 

Gregg Leonard Prange 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Anne Paige Pribonic 2015 

Hudson, Wl 

Anna Grace Price 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Creighton Riley Price 2013 

Saluda, SC 

Hannah Michelle Price 2015 

Fair Play, SC 

Katie Lynn Price 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Kyle Christopher Price 2015 

Roswell, GA 

Ray Bernard Price 2015 

Fort Mill, SC 

Rebecca Kelley Prince 2015 

Little Rock, AR 

John Alexander Patton Pritchard 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Marshall Levering Pritchett 2015 

Woodruff, SC 



Underclassman Portraits I B295 



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Underclassmen 



Courtney L. Proctor 2015 

Falmouth, ME 

Monique Rebecca Pruitt 2015 

San Clemente, CA 

lyanna Caresse Purnell 2015 

//-ma SC 

Taylor Brice Purvis 2015 

Blythewood, SC 

Anna Ralston Qualkinbush 2015 

Central, SC 

Kevin Michael Quarles 2015 

Seneca, SC 

Faith Breanna Rabon 2015 

Conway, SC 

William Everett Rabon 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Justin Michael Ragsdale 2015 

Pelzer, SC 

Tyler Michael Rajeski 2015 

Clifton Park, NY 

Ramiro Alan Ramirez 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Alyson Paige Randolph 2015 

Tega Cay, SC 



296 



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Underclassman Portraits 




Matthew Anthony Randzio 2015 

East Brunswick, NJ 

Aaron Ransdell 2014 

Newberry, SC 

Cayce Adams Rast 2015 

Orangeburg, SC 

William Brandon Rathman 2015 

Mt Pleasant SC 

Erin Lynn Ratterman 2015 

Fishers, IN 

Rebecca Ready 2014 

Irmo, SC 

Ann Elizabeth Reali 2015 

Raleigh, NC 

Delaney Reardon 2015 

Chapel Hill, NC 

Margaux Isabel Rebollo 2015 

Blythewood, SC 

Daniel Rebula 2014 

Mt Pleasant, SC 

Katherine Grace Redmond 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Howard Winston Reece 2015 

Winston Salem, NC 

Benton Louis Reed 2015 

Greer, SC 

Mary Lillian Reed 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Rebecca Catherine Reedy 2015 

Annapolis, MD 

Charles Mclain Reese 2015 

Sullivans Island, SC 

Ashton Lynn Reeves 2015 

Liberty, SC 

Carolyn Rebekah Reeves 2015 

Mt Pleasant, SC 

Miller Breckenridge Reeves 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Van Scott Reid 2013 

Greer, SC 

David Ryan Reynolds 2013 

Anderson, SC 

Elizabeth Covington Reynolds 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Carrie Rhinehart 2014 

Easley, SC 

Anne Kittrell Rice 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



■0297 



Underclassmen 



Brandon Kristoffer Richard 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Jonathan Blake Richardson 2015 

Little Mountain. SC 

Christopher Henry Richert 2015 

Lake Wylie, SC 

Eric Allen Richey 2015 

Florence, SC 

Chance James Riley 2015 

Easley, SC 

James Haffey Rippert 2015 

Mclean, VA 

Lindsay Wickham Rivoir 2015 

Sewickley, PA 

Victoria Anne Rizer 2015 

Lodge, SC 

Colleen Shannon Roarty 2015 

Flemington, NJ 

Kristina Danielle Roberson 2013 

Clemson, SC 

Alexis Regan Roberts 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Natalie Ann Roberts 2015 

Shelby, NC 

Michal Ann Robinson 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Morgan Mackenzie Robinson 2014 

Gaffney, SC 

Sydney Claire Robinson 2015 

Greenville, SC 

William Allen Robinson 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Joshua Rochester 2013 

Westminster, SC 

Ashley Michele Rodgers 2015 

Pinopolis, SC 

Scott Charles Rodgers 2015 

Chapel Hill, NC 

Francis Drake Rogers 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Alexander Joseph Rogier 2015 

North Augusta, SC 

Anna Catherine Rollings 2014 

Bethune, SC 

Zachary Petras Roman 2015 

Midlothian, VA 

Jessica Marie Romine 2014 

Port Royal, SC 



298 



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Underclassman Portraits 




Carly Lynn Rose 2015 

Briarcliff Manor, NY 

Matthew Caine Rosen 2015 

Wheeling, IL 

Andrew Kyle Rothkamm 2015 

Baton Rouge, LA 

Caroline Annette Roxon 2015 

Charleston, SC 

William Caleb Royston 2015 

Sparks, MD 

Raena Peyton Rubenstein 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Bryan Stewart Ruby 2015 

Greer, SC 

Amit Govind Rughani 201 5 

Greer, SC 

Jasmine Ruiz-Yi 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Tristan Wen-Xiang Rulli 2015 

Greer, SC 

Kathryn Ashley Runge 2014 

Piedmont SC 

Eric Todd Rushe 2015 

Seneca SC 



Underclassman Portraifs I B299 



- 



Underclassmen 



Timothy Blane Russell 2014 

Sumter, SC 

Brady Talbot Russo 2015 

Columbia SC 

Nickolas Aldrich Rusthoven 2015 

Florence, SC 

Michael Joseph Rutherford 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Jessica Leeann Rutland 2015 

Ward, SC 

William Joseph Ryan 2015 

Naples, FL 

Laura Ann Hennessy Saari 2015 

Mt Pleasant, SC 

Kevin Thomas Saavedra 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Molly Connolly Sackett 2015 

Alexandria, VA 

Kenan Erdem Sakarcan 2015 

Columbia, SC 

James Douglas Salvati 2015 

Colts Neck, NJ 

Makayla Analisa Samour 2015 

Pelzer, SC 




300 



mk 



Underclassman Portraits 




Angela Mercy Samuel 2015 

Greenville, SC 

William Austin Sanchez 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Kari Leigh-Ann Sanders 2015 

North Charleston, SC 

Leslie Kennedy Sanders 2015 

Myrtle Beach, SC 

Niesha Lakeesha Sanders 2015 

Iva, SC 

Justin Fredrick Sanford 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Gerardo Santana 2013 

Elgin, SC 

Emily Elizabeth Sassard 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Annacie Katherine Sastry 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Kelsie Renae Saurber 2015 

Trenton, OH 

Mary-Catherine Cushman Savant 2014 

Winter Haven, FL 

Stacey Belinda Scaggs 2014 

North Augusta, SC 

Nicholas Anthony Scala 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Brett I. Scharfman 2015 

Rutherford, NJ 

Mara Nicole Schemel 2015 

Florence, SC 

Michael Robert Schlegel 2015 

Franklin, MA 

Katherine Lynn Schnetzer 2015 

Dun woody, GA 

Caitlyn Marie Schulze 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Therann Harold Schwartz 2015 

Roswell, GA 

Kevin Gregory Schwartzman 2015 

Gaithersburg, MD 

Chad Scott 2014 

Columbia, SC 

Danielle Latifah Scott 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Maceo Edward Scott 2013 

Kingstree, SC 

Rebecca Marie Scott 2015 

Lexington, SC 



Underclassman Portrait 



m 



301 



Underclassmen 



Sarah Kyle Scott 2013 

Gaston, SC 

Shannen Margaret Scott 2015 

Springfield, VA 

Mitchell Sherman Scull 2015 

Moore, SC 

Kendall Elisabeth Seagroves 20 1 5 

Myrtle Beach, SC 

Rachel LeeSealby 2015 

Byron, IL 

Cody Seaman 2015 

East Granby, CT 

Creighton Mccall Segars 2015 

Bishopville, SC 

Stefanie Lisa Seidman 2015 

Mt Pleasant, SC 

George Marion Seignious 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Collin John Sekas 2015 

Vienna, VA 

Anthony Todd Self 2015 

Winnsboro, SC 

Kathryn Anne Setzer 2015 

Easley, SC 




302 



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Underclassman Portraits 




Joseph Ryan Seymore 2015 

Laurens, SC 

Neal Albert Shadle 2015 

Atlanta GA 

Hallie Elaine Shafer 2015 

College Station, TX 

Danielle Rae Shaffer 2015 

Summervllle, SC 

Lauren Marie Shanesy 2015 

Gaithersburg, KID 

Christin Elaine Sharp 2015 

Fort Mill, SC 

Chanfe' Nicole Sharper 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Courtney Jacqueline Shaw 2015 

Mclean, VA 

Ryan David Shaw 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Rebekah Lauren Shealy 2015 

Travelers Rest, SC 

Avery Morgan Sheehan 2015 

Graniteville, SC 

Kyle Dennis Shepard 2015 

Grayslake, IL 

Alexander William Sheppard 2015 

Bluffton, SC 

Rachael Paige Sherman 2015 

Charlotte, NC 

Brittany Shirley 2014 

Belton, SC 

Perri Katherine Shockley 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Sara Ruth Shuler 2015 

Santee, SC 

Kathryn Laurel Shumaker 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Sara Ivey Shumpert 2015 

West Columbia, SC 

Kelly Marie Siciliano 2015 

Chester, MD 

Simone Matteo Silvagno 2015 

Charlotte, NC 

Kristian Alexander Simmons 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Mason Elizabeth Simmons 2015 

Fort Mill, SC 

Shaunteca Shaquille Simmons 2015 

Williston, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



1303 



Underclassmen 



Tyler James Simms 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Joshni Emi Simon 2015 

Greenwood, SC 

Allegra Lorelei Simone 2015 

Highland Park, IL 

David Jacob Simons 2015 

Ashton, MD 



Asha Sharifa Akilah Simpson 2015 

Shrewsbury, MA 
David Sinclare 2013 

Clemson, SC 
Monica Elizabeth Sint 2014 

Florence, SC 
Mckinsey Lauren Sizemore 2015 

Brevard, NC 



Sarah Jo Skelton 2015 

Seneca, SC 
Tyler Michael Slaton 2015 

Cumming, GA 
Dakota William Sligh 2015 

Columbia, SC 
NiaS.SIoss 2015 

Winnsboro, SC 



Shannon Elizabeth Smales 2014 

Lake Forest, IL 

Rashad Dominick Smalls 2015 

Hemingway, SC 

Amanda Marie Smay 2015 

Duluth, GA 

Andrew Kevin Smith 2015 

North Augusta, SC 



Catherine Dubose Smith 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Cody Allan Smith 2013 

Saluda, SC 

Haley Ann Smith 2015 

Greer, SC 

Haydan Caitlyn Smith 2015 

Clover, SC 



lain Smith 2015 

Suwanee, GA 

John Smith 2014 

Easley, SC 

Kathleen Louise Smith 2015 

Conway, SC 

Loyd Baxter Smith 2015 

Shelby, NC 



304 



wi 




Underclassman Portraits 




Nicholas Pifat Smith 2015 

Car/. NC 

Patrick Edwin Lee Smith 2015 

North Augusta. SC 

Pierson Favre Smith 2015 

Baton Rouge, LA 

Taylor Smith 2014 

Moore. SC 

Donavon William Smock 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Timothy James Smylie 2015 

Chesterfield, NJ 

Robert Francis Snyder 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Sara Elizabeth Snyder 2015 

Aiken. SC 

Nicholas Michael Solfaro 2015 

Holmdel, NJ 

Allen Gibson Solomons 2013 

Aiken. SC 

Jack Southers 2015 

Atlanta, GA 

William Samuel Sparkman 2015 

Cumming, GA 



Underclassman Portraits 



1305 



Underclassmen 



Ryan Thomas Sparks 2015 

Blackstone, MA 

Kristine Leigh Spaulding 2014 

Hardeeville, SC 

Matheu Storme Spencer 2015 

Central, SC 

Christian Patrick Spiecha 2014 

Clover, SC 

Hannah Marie Sprenger 2013 

Florence, SC 

David Joe Spry 2015 

Townville, SC 

Micah Reston Stachelek 2015 

Sumter, SC 

Jackson Nathaniel Stagg 2015 

Dillon, SC 

Hannah Margaret Staley 2015 

£/ Paso, TX 

Edward Joseph St.Amand 2015 

Marietta, GA 

Cierra Lynn Stanislaus 2015 

Irmo, SC 

Anna Nicole Stastny 2014 

Anderson, SC 

Kristen Sidney Staudt 2014 

West Columbia, SC 

James Ryan Stavrakas 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Derrick Nicholas Steen 2015 

Hartsville, SC 

Meghan Michelle Stelly 2015 

Mobile, AL 

Drew Stephens 2015 

Mauldin, SC 

Gregory Mark Stephens 2014 

Aiken, SC 

Phillip Charles Stephens 2013 

Greer, SC 

Kelly Marie Stern 2015 

York, SC 

Alexander King Stevens 2015 

Spartanburg, SC 

Andrew Stevens 2014 

Johns Island, SC 

Kody Austin Stevens 2015 

Mullins, SC 

Seth Daniel Stevens 2015 

Chapin, SC 




306 



J 



Underclassman Portraits 




Brian Lee Stewart 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Talena Marie Lynn Stewart 2015 

Pendleton, SC 

Elise Anne Stock 2014 

Hartsville, SC 

Ashleigh Lauren Stoddard 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Michael David Stokes 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Jared Robert Stoltz 2015 

Fayetteville, NC 

Michael Wallace Stoner 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Gina Marie Straga 2015 

Mullica Hill, NJ 

Mary Catherine Stribling 2015 

Spartanburg, SC 

Camen Luke Stroud 2015 

Spartanburg, SC 

Rebekah Catherine Strunk 2015 

Fort Mill, SC 

Josh Bentley Stuckey 2015 

Hartsville, SC 



Underclassman Portraits I B307 



- 



Underclassmen 



Sarah Elizabeth Stumpo 2015 

Raleigh, NC 
Elizabeth Adickes Sturgis 2013 

Rock Hill, SC 
Emily Ann Sudduth 2015 

Central, SC 
Emily Marie Sudduth 2015 

Central, SC 

Haley Margaret Sudduth 2015 

Greenville, SC 

John David Sudduth 2015 

Greenville, SC 

John Gerard Suger 2015 

Greer, SC 

Diane Elizabeth Sugrue 2015 

Marietta, GA 

Katherine Linn Sullivan 2015 

Winston Salem, NC 

Robert Burr Sullivan 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Victoria Anne Sullivan 2015 

Sumter, SC 

Adam Wendell Summer 2015 

Newberry, SC 

Sarah Elizabeth Sumner 2015 

Kingsport, TN 

Katrina Anne Sutherland 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Matthew Evan Sutherland 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Sarah Jewell Sutton 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Charles Baxter Swearington 2015 

Piedmont, SC 

Elizabeth Karen Sweeney 2015 

Franklin, MA 

Stephanie Nicole Swenson 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Meredith Alaine Swetenburg 20 1 5 

Simpsonville, SC 

Brooke Vallo Swift 2015 

Greenwich, CT 

Timothy William Sybert 2015 

Alpharetta, GA 

Morgan Elizabeth Tadlock 2015 

China Grove, NC 

Graham Callahan Talley 2015 

Sumter, SC 




308 



a 



Underclassman Portraits 



.»&*. 




Sena Afi Tamaklo 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Melissa Grace Tamimi 2015 

Toms River, NJ 

Marion William Tapp 2015 

Irmo. SC 

Andrew James Taylor 2015 

Simpsonville. SC 

Andrew Paul Taylor 2015 

Chapin, SC 

Jeremy Matthew Taylor 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Logan Scott Taylor 2014 

Lawrenceville, GA 

Matthew Paul Taylor 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Nicole Alexandra Taylor 2015 

Morristown, NJ 

Phoebe Colleen Taylor 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Ryan Zachary Taylor 2015 

Florence, SC 

Spence Mclean Taylor 2015 

Greenville, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



1309 



Underclassmen 



Spencer Hamilton Taylor 2015 

Orangeburg, SC 

Thomas Fletcher Tedder 2015 

Durham, NC 

Taylor Joseph Tench 2015 

Vero Beach, FL 

Jean Marcel Tessier 2015 

Greenville, SC 

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Lindsey Grace Thames 2015 

Sandy Springs, SC 

Melissa Ann Thames 2015 

Mount Pleasant, SC 

Alexandria Drayton Thomas 2015 

Fort Mill, SC 

Chelsea Eran Thomas 2015 

Logan Township, NJ 

Devin Tyler Thomas 2015 

Williamston, SC 

Jasmine Symone Thomas 2015 

Bennettsville, SC 

Kevin Mitchell Thomas 2013 

Marion, SC 

Maggie Kathleen Thomas 2015 

Cheraw, SC 




310 



Ji 



Underclassman Portraits 




Rebecca Jean Thomas 2015 

Denmark, SC 

Auston Thompson 2013 

Piedmont, SC 

Brandi Lacie Thompson 2015 

Greenville. SC 

Madison Lea Thompson 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Shannon Leigh Thompson 2015 

Anderson. SC 

Arthur Lorenzo Thrower 2015 

Charlotte, NC 

Justin Sawyer Tidmore 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Kanisha Keon Tillman 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Willis Paul Tippett 2015 

Roswell, GA 

Aubrey Carroll Toadvine 2015 

Greenville. SC 

Adam Justin Tocci 2015 

Stow. MA 

Jonathan David Todd 2015 

Chapin, SC 

Lassiter James Tollison 2015 

Raleigh, NC 

Kyle Robert Toth 2015 

Huntsville. AL 

Alexander Lasto Totusek 2015 

Omaha, ME 

Alexandra Dupree Townsend 2015 

Liberty, SC 

Francis Asbury Townsend 2015 

Aiken, SC 

George David Townsend 2015 

Lake View, SC 

Lateek Townsend 2015 

Bennettsville, SC 

Tyler Nelson Townsend 2015 

Sumter, SC 

Katherine Grace Travan 2015 

Easley, SC 

David Tripamer 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Dana Malcolm Triplett 2015 

Troutman, NC 

Christian Daniel Trotter 2015 

Is/e Of Palms, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



311 



Underclassmen 



Lauren Suzanne Trout 2015 

Inman, SC 

Dorian Thurston True 2015 

North Augusta, SC 

Wesley Ryan Trutwin 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Leslie Jen Tseng 2015 

Mt Pleasant, SC 

David Hamilton Tucker 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Harrison James Tucker 2015 

Ninety Six, SC 

Ryan Patrick Tucker 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Ryan Patrick Turnau 2015 

Apex, NC 

Julianne Jeanette Turowetz 2015 

Hyannis Port, MA 

Corey Tuten 2014 

Ridgeland, SC 

Hayley Cathell Twigg 2015 

Myrtle Beach, SC 

Katherine Frances Uher 2015 

Palmyra, VA 




312 



Underclassman Portraits 




Bilkan Ulker 2014 

Greer, SC 

Justin Bryant Ulmer 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Chelsea Kaori Uranaka 2015 

Windermere, FL 

Emilia Ruth Urban 2015 

Greer, SC 

Matthew John Urban 2015 

Clemmons, NC 

Jeffrey Edward Vahey 2015 

Surfside Beach, SC 

Kristin Marie Vail 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Kelly Vanderheide 2014 

Columbia, SC 

Jennifer Lauren Van Gelder 2015 

St Petersburg, FL 

Daniel Matthew Vanoverstraeten 2013 

Inman, SC 

Kevin Charles Vanslyke 2015 

Lexington, MA 

Jonathan Alexander Vasto 2015 

Charlotte, NC 

Michael Chase Vaughan 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Kimberly Mandario Villafranca 2015 

Cheraw, SC 

Casi Victoria Villereal 2015 

Kershaw, SC 

Josh Vine 2014 

Aiken. SC 

Ryan Wesley Waataja 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Michael Waddell 2014 

Columbia, SC 

Mary Elizabeth Waddill 2015 

Franklin, TN 

Elizabeth Lee Wagner 2015 

Anderson, SC 

Adair Elizabeth Walker 2015 

Dublin, OH 

Kiersten Elizabeth Walker 2015 

Easton, CT 

Kayleigh Jordan Wall 2015 

Inman, SC 

Patrick J. Wallach 2015 

Reva, VA 



Underclassman Portraits 



313 



Underclassmen 



Chelsey Waller 2014 

Charleston, SC 

Chelsea Nicole Wallis 2013 

Centreville, VA 

Dana Lynn Walters 2015 

Winston Salem, NC 

Nathan Edward Walters 2015 

Blythewood, SC 

Joseph Richard Walton 2015 

Murrells Inlet, SC 

Baxter Moore Ward 2015 

Effingham, SC 

Joshua Andrew Ward 2015 

Beaufort, SC 

Lillie Demarest Warden 2015 

Charlottesville, VA 

Miranda Faye Warnock 2015 

Roebuck, SC 

Anna Patrice Warren 2015 

Columbia, SC 

Bailey Joanne Warren 2014 

Bothell, WA 

Natalie Washington 2014 

Columbia, SC 




314 



a 



Underclassman Portraits 




Tierra Christian Washington 2015 

Early Branch, SC 

Stephen Thaddaeus Wassynger 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Erin Taylor Watkins 2015 

Blythewood, SC 

Andrew Ellis Watson 2015 

Niceville, FL 

Zachary Thomas Watson 2015 

Summerville, SC 

WesWatt 2013 

Clemson, SC 

Christina Watters 2014 

Seneca, SC 

Jessica Wayland 2014 

Pendleton, SC 

Caroline Elizabeth Weaver 2015 

Turbeville, SC 

Ashley Webber 2014 

Moncks Corner, SC 

Latishia Deon Webber 2015 

Hardeeville, SC 

Carly Weber 2014 

Greer. SC 

David Anthony Weikle 2015 

North Augusta, SC 

Breen Meredith Weir 2015 

Hilton Head Island, SC 

Hannah Lane Welborn 2014 

Spartanburg, SC 

Joshua Pierce Welch 2015 

Summerville, SC 

Rebecca Alice Welch 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Thomas Walker Welch 2013 

Lyman, SD 

Kyle Steven Wentzel 2015 

Pawleys Island, SC 

Kara Nicole Wertenbach 2015 

Bonneau, SC 

Gina Leigh Wessinger 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Michael Stephen Wheeler 2015 

Lanoka Harbor, NJ 

Elizabeth Rhymer Wheelon 2015 

Hendersonville, NC 

Mitchel Wayne Whetstone 2015 

Bamberg, SC 






Underclassman Portraits 



u 



315 



Underclassmen 



Brian Michael Andrew Whitaker 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Katie Rene White 2015 

Brentwood, TN 

Savannah Jane White 2015 

Gaffney, SC 

Sierra White 2015 

Greer, SC 

James Grady Whitlaw 2013 

Aiken, SC 

John Mark Whitman 2015 

Greer, SC 

Blake Whitson 2013 

Conyers, GA 

Andrew Michael Whitten 2015 

Newtown, PA 

Garrett Wayne Whittle 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Austin Carroll Whitworth 2015 

Roebuck, SC 

Jacob Evan Whitworth 2015 

Easley. SC 

William Joel Wier 2014 

Greenville, SC 




316 



Ji 



Underclassman Portraits 




Brooks Emerson Wiggans 2015 

Arnold, MD 

Robert Peyton Wilber 2015 

I rmo, SC 

Garrison Sumner Wilcox 2015 

North Augusta, SC 

Savannah Nichole Wiles 2015 

Williamston, SC 

Kevin Tabor Wilhoit 2015 

Greer, SC 

Nathaniel Lewis Wilkins 2015 

Indian Shores, FL 

Victoria Camille Wilkins 2015 

Simpsonville, SC 

Alexandra Shea Williams 2015 

Sumter, SC 

Ashleigh Deann Williams 2014 

Easley, SC 

Caleb Mitchell Williams 2015 

Blythewood. SC 

Charles Edward Williams 2015 

Taylors, SC 

Conli Erin Williams 2015 

Florence, SC 



Underclassman Portraits 



317 



Underclassmen 



Drew Williams 2015 

Summerville, SC 

Jodi Allison Williams 2014 

Murrells Inlet, SC 

Kathleen Marie Williams 2015 

Moncks Corner, SC 

Maranda Lane Williams 2015 

Campobello, SC 

Samuel Hunter Williams 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Sebastian Devon Williams 2015 

Greenville, SC 

Taylor Marie Williams 2015 

Brittons Neck, SC 

Andrew Thomas Williamson 2015 

Columbia, SC 

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Benjamin Covey Willkens 2015 

Chevy Chase, MD 

Brittanie Michele Wilson 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Christian Michael Wilson 2015 

Greer, SC 

Elizabeth Wilson 2015 

Columbia, SC 

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318 



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Underclassman Portraits 




Hailey Robin Wilson 2015 

Spartanburg, SC 

Kevin Dwayne Wilson 2014 

North Augusta, SC 

Tamaura Danielle Wilson 2014 

Holly Hill, SC 

William Charles Wilson 2015 

Williamston, SC 

Kaleigh Elizabeth Winchester 2015 

Liberty. SC 

Jessica Rose Wiseman 2015 

Sumrnerville, SC 

Abigail Anne Witmer 2015 

Naperville. IL 

Sarah Elizabeth Witt 2015 

Swampscott, MA 

Michael John Woerner 2015 

Spartanburg, SC 

Benjamin Rice Woftord 2015 

Seneca, SC 

Bryan Lee Wolfe 2015 

Birmingham, AL 

Eric Shane Wolfe 2015 

North Charleston, SC 

Ryan Patrick Wolniak 2015 

Cockeysville, MD 

Averie Leigh Wood 2014 

Ware Shoals, SC 

Alexis Unquia Woodbury 2015 

Myrtle Beach, SC 

Caroline Elizabeth Workman 2015 

Winston Salem, NC 

Phillips Stone Workman 2015 

Monticello, GA 

Blair Elizabeth Worthington 2015 

Greer, SC 

Ashley Alexandra Wright 2015 

Florence. SC 

Sydney Morgan Wright 2015 

Rock Hill, SC 

Justin Turner Wylie 2013 

Greer, SC 

Christina Carman Wynne 2015 

Easley. SC 

Mikita Yankouski 2015 

North Charleston, SC 

David Martin Yannarella 2015 

Phillipsburg, NJ 



Underclassman Portraits 



319 



Underclassmen 



Bobby Yarborough 2015 

Lexington, SC 

Leigh Ellen Yarborough 2015 

Columbia SC 

Perry Alan Yarborough 2013 

Clemson, SC 

Derek Wayne Yarke 2015 

Sumter, SC 

Gregory Scott Yingling 2015 

Moorestown, NJ 

William Henry Yoste 2015 

Dallas, TX 

Alexander Jameson Young 2015 

Indian Land, SC 

Patrick David Young 2015 

Ashburn, VA 

Taylor Annette Young 2015 

Aurora, IL 

Andrew Charles Zachary 2015 

Greer, SC 

Brittany Ann Zaremba 2015 

Aiken, SC 

Jonathan Daniel Zazinski 2015 

Myrtle Beach, SC 




Ji 



320 I I Underclassman Portraits 




Rebecca Bryan Ziehm 2015 

Dallas, TX 

Michael George Ziobrowski 2013 

Lewiston, NY 

Kathryn Margaret Zobel 2015 

Charleston, SC 

Sommer Ann Zusin 2013 

Lancaster, SC 



Underclassman Portrail 



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321 



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By: Katherine Williams 
Greeks & Organizations Editor 



reek 

village to come 



As of the spring semester of 2012, Clemson 
has 41 fraternity and sorority chapters 
from 3 different councils. Several thousand 
students make up the Greek community at 
Clemson University, and while those chapters 
are sponsored by Clemson, there is currently not 
an on-campus housing location for all of them. 
With the help of Clemson's housing department 
and several advisory hoards, plans tor a Greek 
Village are under way. "Our goal is to include 
every organization so we can come together 
as one, which will create a bond between the 
organizations. We want to continue the idea of the 
'Clemson Family' and believe this is just the way to 
^\n it," says Eva Watts, a student representative of 
the Fraternity and Sorority Village Planning Team. 
The houses will nor be gigantic mansions, hut 



instead will be close-knit and inviting. They will all 
have a chapter room to allow for the organization 
to conduct ritual. The location picked out for the 
new Greek Village will be the current Thornhill 
Village site. Some house layouts will provide 
basements while other layouts will not. While 
sororities and fraternities will be allowed to hold 
social functions at the houses, all functions will 
have to be cleared through the university first. 

Plans for Clemson's Greek Village began in 
the Fall of 2009 and site visits were conducted 
at Auburn University, Emory University, The 
University of Georgia, and University of West 
Georgia. The finalized date of the finished Greek 
Village has not yet been announced. 




Alpha Chi Omega 




Alpha Chi Omega was founded in 1885 and came to Clemson University in 1985. Nationally, our sorority's 
philanthropic focus is on the fight against domestic violence. Here at Clemson, the Theta Lambda Chapter 
concentrates specifically on Safe Harbor, a local battered women's shelter. We host an annual Dinner Gala/Silent - 
Auction in the fall and a dodge ball tournament (Dodge Domestic Violence) in the spring. The money raised from both 
events goes to Safe Harbor to help buy anything the shelter needs in order to help victims of domestic violence. We also 
welcome speakers to campus to raise awareness on this issue. 

Alpha Chis are well-rounded girls, as you can easily see on campus. From philanthropic events (our own and others) to 
studying in Cooper Library to dressing in orange for game day, our sisters are all over campus representing Alpha Chi 
Omega in many ways. Our domination on the intramural fields and in the classroom makes us stand out wherever we 
go. Our leadership and loyalty aren't just limited to our sorority, many of our sisters are leaders in other organizations on 
campus and we always represent Clemson's Greek Community and the Tigers in the best ways possible. 





Sigma Kappa 







The Sigma Kappa chapter at Clemson is based on service, personal growth, friendship, and loyalty. Sigma 
Kappa is very involved within the university and has won various awards throughout its time at Clemson, 
including the First Friday float competition in 2009 and 201 1. They also host a Week of Giving, during which 
they do acts of service around campus. 

Gamma IpHi Beta 




Gamma Phi Beta was founded November 11, 1874 in Syracuse, New York, and was the first women's fraternal group to be 
called a sorority. Today, we have more than 140 active collegiate chapters including our Clemson chapter, Epsilon Theta. 
uamma Phi Beta has a long history of community service and philanthropic participation. Camping for girls has been the 
international philanthropic focus of our sorority since 1929. Gamma Phi Beta works with Camp Fire USA and Girl Guides of 
Canada to provide camping experiences to enrich the lives of girls. Each spring, our chapter sponsors Moonball, a glow-in-the- 
Jark volleyball tournament open to any group on campus. We also support other Greek letter organizations and volunteer in 
;he local Clemson community. Additionally, Gamma Phi Beta stresses academic excellence, and our chapter has consistently 
'anked above the all-women's GPA on Clemson's campus. 

We are a very talented and diverse group of women. Our members hold leadership positions on committees and organizations 
icross campus. We work together as sisters to maintain the ideals of our founding members, promote Clemson's Greek 
immunity, and support Clemson University. 



Greeks 



327 



Delta Delta Delta 




Delta Delta Delta strives to live up to aspirations of her founder, Sarah Ida Shaw, of inner self and character by 
maintaining lofty GPAs, actively participating in all campus events, upholding admirable representation, and 
living up to the sorority's motto that each member holds dear: "Let us steadfastly love one another." 



Chi Omega 




In 1895 at the University of Arkansas, our five founders came together for a common purpose: to form an 
organization that values the talents of women and encourages them to realize their greatest potential. The Psi 
Kappa chapter is proud to be part of the largest women's fraternal organization in the world and one of its 173 
collegiate chapters. 



328 



Greeks 




Zeta f aw Alpha 

The Kappa Zeta chapter of Zeta Tan Alpha provides young women with opportunities to immerse themselves in 
service. The members of ZTA proudly boast 100% involvement in other campus and community organizations, 
with many members holding leadership positions in Clemson University Undergraduate Student Government, Order 
of Omega, Blue Key Honor Society, FeelGood, TakeNote, Clemson Rally Cats, Clemson Cheerleaders, and Clemson 
University Tour Guides, to name a few. 

Zeta Tau Alpha proudly distributes breast self-exam cards and "Think Pink" ribbons to promote its national 
philanthropy, breast cancer awareness and education. Kappa Zeta also hosts "Big Man on Campus," a male beauty 
pageant in which the entire Clemson community unites to raise money for this cause, raising $25,000 each year. With 
continual growth both at Clemson and around the nation, Zeta Tau Alpha is the perfect home for a young woman 
Striving tor excellence. After all, "Only the best get crowned. ..ZTA!" 




Alpha Gamma Rho 







The purpose of the Beta Zeta chapter of Alpha Gamma Rho (AGR) fraternity is to make better men. Arriving 
on Clemson's campus in 1974, AGR quickly established its place in the University. Our chapter was the first 
fraternity in South Carolina to have an off-campus fraternity house which remains at the heart of our brotherhood 
today. AGR is an agricultural fraternity, but at the same time is very diverse and maintains a true southern gentlemen 
image. Our chapter volunteers at the daycare bordering our property by orchestrating an annual Easter Egg Hunt for 
the children. Our brothers are very involved in our philanthropies and local charities, including Cheesefest, which 
raises money for our fallen brother Jonathon "Cheese" Pelletier and current Clemson students struggling with cancer. 
Last year, in our annual Cheesefest fundraiser, our chapter raised upwards of $15,000. When young men work 
shoulder to shoulder there is no room to turn back, only to move forward. This is the true brotherhood found in the 
Beta Zeta Chapter of Alpha Gamma Rho. 




Alpha ffcwv Pi 




Alpha Delta Pi is committed to sisterhood, values and ethics, high academic standards and social responsibility. 
We have received the Golden Lion Chapter award the past four years. This is the highest honor an Alpha Delta 
Pi Chapter can receive. We also won Panhellenic Chapter of the Year the past three years. 



Alpha Sigma Phi 




The Epsilon Upsilon chapter of Alpha Sigma Phi was founded at Clemson University on April 5th, 2008 and has 
quickly grown to be one of the largest and most successful Alpha Sigma Phi chapters in the nation. Brothers are 
hi»hly involved on campus and participate in organizations including Calhoun Honors College, Mortar Board, Order 
of Omega, Student Senate, and Transfer Council and also serve as Orientation Ambassadors, Resident Assistants, and 
Welcome Leaders. Epsilon Upsilon consistently has one of the highest GPAs on campus (highest fraternity average GPA 
in Spring 2011 with a 3.2). Each December the chapter hosts Deck the Halls, our annual philanthropy, which consists 
of a fraternity house decorating competition, fundraiser, and toy drive to help raise donations for Clemson Community 
Care. By placing a large importance on campus involvement, academics, and philanthropy, we truly strive to live up to 
our motto "to better the man." 

Greeks 



331 



Delta Sigma Theta 




The Omicron Phi Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta, Sorority, Inc. was chartered on Clemson University's campus May 
5, 1983 and has had the esteemed honor of continuing the devastating legacy of our illustrious Sorority for 28 years. 
The chapter is devoted to uplifting the students of the University and the Clemson community, thus they have imple- 
mented many new, innovative projects and programs pertaining to our 5 Point Programmatic Thrust and in result is why 
they are the National Collegiate Chapter of the Year 2010-2011. The chapter strives to uphold the Sorority's values of 
scholarship, sisterhood and service throughout Clemson's campus and exude characteristics that are nothing less than 
that of a phenomenal woman. 

Alpha Tau Omega 





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he ATO Clemson chapter has an annual chili cook-off that benefits Golf 9/12 and a Viking week competition benefitting 
Clemson Childhood Development Center. 

In Loving Memory of John Robert Clinton 
"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." 

JRC Brothers always. 
John 1:6-9 



332 



m\ 



Greeks 




Kappa IPtoa 



Since our founding at Clemson University in 1980, the Epsilon Tau Chapter of Kappa Delta Sorority is constantly 
striving for that which is honorable, beautiful and highest. The women of Kappa Delta are committed to suc- 
cess in academics, leadership and community service. With over 90 percent of our sisters involved in other Clemson 
organizations, many hold executive leadership positions on councils such as Student Alumni Council, Panhellenic 
Executive Council, Order of Omega and Mortar Board Honor Society. In the 2011 fall semester, our chapter ranked 
above the All-Sorority and All-University GPA average and reported over 20,000 service hour contributions to our 
community. In the spring of 201 1, our annual Shamrock Golf ck Tennis Tournament raised over $1 5,000 to sup- 
port our national and local philanthropy, Prevent Child Abuse America. Whether we're planning a Girl Scout event 
tor a local troop, participating in philanthropy events or mixing with other Greek organizations, we are always find- 
ing ways to further our Clemson Experience. Attending fall bonfire and spring shag functions, tailgating at football 
games and enjoying sisterhood events are favorite past-times tor Kappa Deltas! We are committed to sisterhood and 
promoting confidence in women and girls within our chapter, on our college campus and in the local community. 
This year we were proud to welcome over 50 new members to our sisterhood. AOT and Go Tigers! 





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OrgSync is an online access 
to participation in and 
administration of student organizations 
at Clemson University. OrgSync offers 
the ability to enhance an organization's 
recognition, start a new organization, 
and explore student organizations that 
suit one's extra-curricular schedule. 
Students can search by name or 
category through the more than three- 
hundred student organizations to 
learn more about them as well as join. 
Students can see each organization's 
profile, and once a member of the 
group, can view the organization's 
private portal. The program features 
over 35 unique tools to run an 



Olivia Elswick 
Junior Staff 

organization, including a roster feature 
to invite members and run reports, a 
community-wide calendar, and online 
storage space. There is even a "news 
feed" much like Facebook, Twitter, 
or Tumblr, where organizations can 
post announcements and stories 
about upcoming events. OrgSync is a 
great way for students to manage and 
keep up to date with student clubs. 
Technical support is offered for the 
system. Tara Gasparovic, a former 
intern for OrgSync said, "We are really 
trying to continue to get the word out 
about it on campus so that students 
can take advantage of what a great 
resource it is!" 



Student Clubs and Organizations 

A Campus Life Student Clubs ana Organizations Find an Organization 



Find an Organization 



Search by Name or Description 



GET INVOLVED! 

For questions email orgsync@clemson.edu ( I 



Browse by Name - View All 
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ 



Browse by Category - Undergraduate 

Club Sports Program (38) 
Campus Wide Programming (3) 
Creative/Performing Arts (13) 
Cultural/International (13) 
Governing (7) 
Honorary (27) 
Media (8) 
Political Activism (9) 



Professional/Academic/Dept (90) 
Religious/Faith (34) 
Service/Advocacy (56) 
Social Fraternity/Sorority (47) 
Special Interest (20) 
Sports/Recreation (31) 



EVERYTHING'S ONLINE 

Whether searching for a sports club or a political 
organization, all of Clemson's organizations can 
be found on the Orgsync website. 
Photo Katherine Williams 



aus/Faith (1) 
f:e/Advocacy (2) 
Interest (2) 




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Student Clubs at C 

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V\l 

Find an Cjai 

Join an Cja 

Start an C;a 

Advisor gi 

Learn2 at 



Tiger 



Learn2Lead Series 

At Clemson University, the Student Organizations and Clubs area of the 
Harvey and Lucinda Gantt Center for Student Life believes leadership is a 
relational process where individuals work together to make positive chang 
in their organizations and their community. We believe leadership can be 
taught and all students have the capacity to lead. 

With us, you can: 

• Learn to lead in a student organization 

• Enroll in a leadership learning workshop 

• Participate in a leadership learning retreat 

• Reouest a facilitator to attend your organization's meetings 

t Engage in a personalized leadership consultation with Center staff- 



LEADERSHIP 

With the help of Orgsync, Clemson offers 
workshops where participants explore in-depth, 
various topics of leadership and management 

Photo by Katherine Williams 



336 



Organizations 



tSON 



Clemson Home A-z :rcex Calencar Campus Maps CU Safety Phonebook 



I'LIFE 



SEARCH 



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I OrgSync 



OrgSy/nc 




is your online gateway to involvement in and the management of student organizations at Clemson University. Tr 
gateway is powered by OrgSync who developed the online features and tools. Orgsync also provides ongoing tec 
support and for the system. 

Things you do in OrgSync@Clemson include: 

• Renew your organization's recognition 

• Start a new Organization 

• Explore and join student organizations and track your co-curricular activities 

There are over 35 tools and features available to organizations including: 

• A Roster feature for communicating with members, inviting new members, running reports and morel 

• A Calendar for scheduling events within your organization and community-wide 

■ Online storage space where student organizations can store documents, pictures, or any other files that 
should "stay with the org," even after members graduate and move on. 

• Online forms available just to your organization or community-wide 

• Polling tools to get quick feedback from your group or community-wide 

■ A website builder allowing organizations to easily create a public website, display their calendars and post 
pictures from events 1 



amzations 






Student Organization Advisors 

All recognized dubs and organizations are required to have an advisor who is a full-time member of Clemson 
University's faculty o» staff. The choice of who an organizabon's advisor will be is at the discrebon of the organization 
and the chosen advisor. 



ation 



An advisor is more than a signature. Advisors help students take full advantage of co-curncular learning and serve as a 
role model and mentor for members of recognized student orgamzabons. Student-faculty/staff interaction outside of the 
classroom enhances the overall college experience and reaps many benefits - both for the students and the individual 
advisor. 



ation 



Sync " v0u arc intcreste d m becoming an advisor to a student organization, please complete the Advisor interest form. 

*l 2011 To Activate your Pertonil Account on OrgSyncOClemson 

itact US * Cl,ck OrgSynceClemson. 

• Login usmg your CU10 and password 

• New users will be prompted to create a user profile 

• Enter the requested information You can even upload a picture of yourself. Click "Finished" when you arc 
done. 

• Vou will then be taken to your Personal Account. 

loin an Organization: 

• Click "Join an Org" at the top of your personal account page. 

• You will see all recognized student organizations on campus listed m alphabetical order You can search the 
listing by name, category or keyword. 

• The first orgonizabon you should join is "Advisor Resources" found in the Administration Category. You will 
be automatically added. 



• You will be able to access that organizabon's profile in the future by going to your Personal Account, 
scrolling over 'My Orgs* at the top of page and clicking the abbreviated organization name. 



HOMEPAGE 

Orgsync is an easy way to be more 
involved in everything Clemson 
has to offer. 
Photo by Katherine Williams 



DIRECTIONS 

Orgsync makes it easy for advisors 

to add their organization to the 

system. 

Photo rn> Katherine Williams 

EASY AS CAN BE 
The Orgsync website walks 
Students through how to join 
their particular organization. 
Photo by Katherine Williams 



A-z Inoei Caiencar campus Maps cu Safety Phonebook webcar 






How to Join a Student Organization 

OrgSync ©Clemson is your online gateway to involvement in student organizations at Clemson University. 

Any Clemson University student, faculty, staff or alumni member with a valid CUID can create a user account and take 
advantage of the many tools and features in the system. You can browse student organizations, submit join requests 
and even start new organizations m OrgSync©Clemson. 

The web-based platform streamlines communicabon and helps to build a stronger campus community for recognized 
student organizations (RSO,v It has more than 35 tools to help students, officers, advisor and administrators manage 
day-to-day processes 

Once you have activated your Personal Account you will be able to jom Clemson University's recognized student 
organizations 

Activate your Personal Account 

• Go to OrgSyncQOemson 

• Login using your CU10 and password. 

• New users will be prompted to create a user profile 

• Enter the requested information. You can even upload a picture of yourself. Click "Finished* when you are 
done. 

• You wilt then be taken to your Personal Account. 

Join an Organization 

• Click "Join an Org" at the top of your personal account page. 

• You will see all recognized student organizations on campus listed m alphabetical order, You can search the 
listing by name, category or keyword. 

• Find a group and click "Join" 

• Note: To find out more about a particular group, click on the group's name. 

• Enter the organization's password if you know it or request to "Join* with a reason if you do not know the 
password 

• You will receive an e-mait stating that you have been accepted as a member. 

My Orgs 

• Once you have been accepted into an organization, you will be able to access that organization's profile in 
the future by going to your Personal Account, scrolling over "My Orgs" at the top of page and clicking the 
abbreviated organization name. 



Organizations 



337 



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Established in 2007, the Biomedical Engineering Development Society exists to provide its members with the 
experiences they need to grow and become the biomedical engineers of the future. Members are given the 
opportunity to network with industry and academia, as well as engage in critical discussions about the field. Members 
also participate in engineering outreach programs, Habitat for Humanity builds, and other activities that promote social 
responsibility and individual growth. 



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WSBF-FM began as a closed circuit broadcasting facility on May 1, 1958 and made its first broadcast on April Fool's 
Day of 1960. The purpose of WSBF is to provide students, faculty, staff, and the community with educational 
entertainment, news, and alternative music, culture, and events. WSBF is "The Upstate's Only True Alternative." WSBF 
broadcasts on 88.1 FM and wsbf.net 






338 



*& 



Organizations 



Student Alumni Council 




The Student Alumni Council, founded in 1 L )74, is the 35 member group that works alongside the Clemson Alumni 
Association. The organization not only promotes the traditions of Clemson, but also establishes students as donors to 
the University. Some of the events coordinated and sponsored by SAC include Welcome Back Festival, Cocky's Funeral, 
Master Teacher Award, Senior Week, and the Ring ceremonies. 



Material Advantage 




Material Advantage is a great organization that strives to better the relationship or Materials Science engineers with 
employers and fellow engineers. MA does everything from liquid nitrogen ice cream and bowling to touring the 
BMW plant in Greenville. MA also currently has a mug making team dedicated to creating a mug for the mug drop 
competition at MSckT each year. 



Organizations 



339 



Ag Mech 







The Clemson Ag. Mech. Club is a student organization focused around the interests of agriculture technology and 
mechanics. We invite students from all majors to join our club and become interested in the new technologies of 
today's agriculture. The club hosts meetings in MeAdams Hall typically in the middle of the week. 



TakeNote 




TakeNote is Clemson University's exclusive all female a cappella ensemble. The group is comprised of 14 women 
selected from the larger Clemson choral ensemles by audition. The ladies perform music ranging from "oldies but 
goodies" to more contemporary song arrangements. TakeNote, entering into its tenth year as a Clemson University 
breakout group, continues to perform at a variety of venues such as the President's Box during football games, in local 
schools, and at various community functions. 



340 



Organizations 



. 



Greek Programming Board 




The purpose of Greek Programming Board is to promote and advance Greek Lite as a whole, both on Clemson's 
campus and in the community. The hoard serves as the unifying body amongst the [nterfraternity Council, National 
Pan-Hellenic Council, and the Collegiate Panhellenic Council by hosting social and educational events that foster a 
common sense of purpose for Greeks. 

Mortar ^oard 




Mortar Board is a national honor society recognizing college seniors tor exemplary scholarship, leadership and service. 
Clemson's Order of Athena chapter began in 1968. Today, membership is a privilege offered to the top 10% of 
the senior class at Clemson. Order of Athena hosts several events, including the Annual 4.0 Banquet with President and 
Mrs. Barker and the Miss Clemson Scholarship Pageant. 



Organizations 



341 



Pre -Ye 




This pre-professional organization is open to all majors, especially those interested in pursuing a career in the veterinary 
field. The club's main goal is to better prepare students for applying to vet school. The club provides experience 
with volunteer opportunities, events, <Sl vet related speakers. For only the second time, the club will be traveling to the 
APVMA National Symposium this year. 



Student Senate 




The Student Senate is the legislative branch of Student Government. Senators draft and vote on legislation that 
impacts student life. Within Senate, committees work on different areas of Clemson. Committee projects are related 
to transit route changes, dining hall hours, mobile applications and organization funding. Senators work closely with 
Clemson Administrators, Faculty, and Staff to accomplish their goals each year. 



?42 



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Organizatic 



Cross Impact 




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ross Impact is a group of believers proclaiming Jesus Christ through: Bible studies and small groups, personal 
discipleship, local church involvement, and support tor a Christian world view. 



For I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes. (Romans 1:16) 



Keramos 




Keramos is an honors society whose main focus is to help students network with Clemson employees and possible 
employers in the Materials Science field. Keramos helps host an alumni tailgate every fall, sends students to MS&T 
(a materials convention), and contributes to the general engineering tours held in the fall. 



Organizations 



343 



Delta Alpha Pi 




Delta Alpha Pi recognizes top-ranking students with disabilities. Delta Alpha Pi (DAP) was founded in 2004. The three 
Greek letters stand for disability, achievement and pride. Members display pride in their academic accomplishments 
as honor students, proving students with disabilities can achieve academically. Through public recognition, leadership 
and visible participation in educational activities, DAP members counteract such prejudice. 



Sertoma <£w? 




Sertoma promotes SERvice TO MAnkind by communication of thoughts, ideas and concepts to accelerate human 
progress in health, education, freedom and democracy. Through activities such as workdays at Camp Sertoma, visiting 
children at the Helping Hands emergency shelter, hosting a school supplies drive for Haitian schools, and participating in 
Relay for Life, Sertoma strives to actively pursue its service mission. 



344 



Jl 



Organizations 



Society of the Third Sophistic 




The Society of the Third Sophistic (S3S) is the student body organization of the Rhetorics, Communication and 
Information Design (RCID) Ph.D. program in the College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities. S3S is the Clemson 
chapter of the Rhetoric Society of America and exists to promote professionalization and socialization for RCID students, 
faculty, and others interested in the fields or rhetorics. 



Concrete <£ms.Q5 Team 




The Clemson Concrete Canoe Team (3CT) has been designing, building and racing concrete canoes to compete at the 
regional Carolinas Conference, which they have won 18 of the last 19 years. Last year, 3CT placed 11th at the ASCE 
National Concrete Canoe Competition. This year's team is looking to be more innovative and creative to build on their 
past success. 



Organizations 



345 



Central Spirit 




Central Spirit's purpose is to promote and maintain the traditionally high degree of interest and school spirit that 
exists towards the intercollegiate athletic program at Clemson University. We also strive to communicate with 
students and the Athletic Department to improve the support of athletics at Clemson University. 

Central Spirit is also responsible for sponsoring and overseeing the First Friday Parade and the Homecoming Build. We 
have also brought back Spirit Blitz to increase student support for all of Clemson athletics. 

Our members are responsible for blowing up balloons for football and select other sporting events, painting Tiger Paws 
on people's faces, waving the flags on the field during football games, organizing giveaways for non-revenue events, passing 
out $2 bills for away games, and just being as loud as possible at all athletic events! 



346 




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Organizations 



National Society of Black Engineers 







The NSBE mission is to increase the number or culturally responsible black engineers, who excel academically, 
succeed professionally, and positively impact the community. Members strive to fulfill this mission everyday and view 
each other as family instead of peers. NSBE mentors kids from three upstate counties weekly, attend national/regional 
conferences to learn professionalism, and help and encourage each other to succeed academically. 

Cuong Nhu Club 




Cuong Nhu is a blend of seven different styles of martial arts. It is essentially a "traditional" mixed martial art. 
Students learn a wide variety of skills and techniques, including how to defend against and use certain weapons. It 
provides students with a fun and easy way to stay in shape, learn martial arts, and practice self-defense techniques. 



Organizations 



L 



347 



Lutheran Campus, Ministry 




Clemson's Lutheran Campus Ministry is a community where students can grow spiritually and find support and 
guidance as they move into young adulthood. Wednesday night gatherings offer fellowship in a casual and welcoming 
environment. Sunday worship, Bible studies, volunteer work and international travel combine to form a meaningful and 
fulfilling experience of Christian love. 



Tigers for Tigers 




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"" Hgers for Tigers is dedicated to preserving tigers through education, research, and service learning on local and global 
JL levels. Our goals are to increase awareness and interest in tiger-range countries and enhance Clemson University's 
reputation for social responsibility and public service. Clemson has endless pride for our mascot, and we extend our 
efforts to save the wild endangered tiger. 



348 



Organizations 



Kappa Kappa Psi 





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The Kappa Beta Chapter of Kappa Kappa Psi, National Honorary Band Fraternity, serves Clemson University Bands 
by providing water tor Tiger Band rehearsals, painting the band practice field, and planning an annual band banquet, 
as we exist to aid in creating an environment in which students of music at Clemson can strive tor the highest and reach 
their full potential. 

Sigma Alpha Tau 




The objective of this sorority shall 
be to promote its members in all 
facets of agriculture and to strengthen 
the bonds of friendship among them. 
It is the purpose of the members to 
strive tor achievement in scholarship, 
leadership and service, and to further 
the development of excellence in women 
pursuing careers in agriculture. 



Organizations 



349 



American Society of Civil Engineers 




American Society of Civil Engineers, Clemson University Chapter is the host organization of the Clemson Concrete 
Canoe Team and the Clemson Steel Bridge Team. The Clemson Concrete Canoe Team have had appearances at the 
National Concrete Canoe Competition 17 of the last 18 years and 3 National Championships. The Clemson Steel Bridge 
Team had 15 consecutive national appearances and was the 2001 National Champion. 



Nurses' Association 




Clemson University's Student Nurses' Association is a pre-professional organization for students enrolled in Clemson's 
nursing program. CU-SNA is a constituent member of the larger fellowship of nursing students known as the 
National Student Nurses' Association [NSNA]. Through CU-SNA, members are able to obtain educational opportunities, 
leadership experience, participation in legislative processes, community service, and career networking. 



350 



Jl 



Organizations 



Cooperative Student Fellowship 




Cooperative Student Fellowship is the college ministry ot First Baptist Clemson. We focus on faith, hope, and 
love - "and the greatest of these is love" (I Corinthians 1 3: 1 3). Thursday gatherings include worship, fellowship, 
discussion, and dinner, 6:45-8:30 pm at FBC, located beside the downtown parking deck. All students are welcome as we 
journey together through life and faith. 



Foundation for International 

Medical Relief of Children 




FIMRC, the Foundation tor International Medical Relief or Children, is a non-profit organization founded in 2002 
that strives to provide health care to children all over the world. The Clemson Chapter began in 2004 and continues 
to support the FIMRC mission through fundraising for medical supplies, local volunteerism to benefit children in the 
Clemson community, and through sending volunteers to FIMRC sites in Central America. 



Organizations 



351 



Club Gymnastics, 







T 



Clemson Club Gymnastics was founded in September 2006. We are a co-ed team that competes in the National 
Association of Intercollegiate Gymnastics Clubs (NAIGC). A competitive or noncompetitive option is offered to 
allow people of all skill levels to participate. Clemson was the first collegiate gymnastics club in South Carolina. 



Amateur Radio Club 




The purpose of the Clemson University Amateur Radio Club is to promote the use of amateur radio as a means of 
communication during both normal and emergency situations, thereby promoting public safety. We construct, build 
and test our own equipment and use it to participate in contests, demonstrations and other events throughout the year. 



352 



Ji 



Organizations 



Ranger Club 




The Clemson Rangers is an all volunteer club that is affiliated with the Army ROTC. The club is open for membership 
to all Clemson University .students with no ROTC commitment. The purpose of the club is to challenge students 
physically, mentally and academically, promote self-confidence, increase leadership capability, increase military knowledge, 
and promote overall professionalism and integrity. 



CBBS Advisor Board 




The College of Business and Behavioral Sciences' Student Advisory Board is comprised of juniors and seniors from 
each department within the college. This group of esteemed individuals works alongside the administration to 
address the concerns of their peers and assists in the organization of college-wide initiatives and events. 



Organizations 



353 



TigerPaw Productions 




TigerPaw Productions (TPP) is one of the largest student run organizations at Clemson. TPP is unique because it hires 
more than 400 students to help produce hundreds of events at Clemson and in the community. The leadership of 
TigerPaw Productions also serves as the University concert committee and works to promote concerts in the interest to 
the student body as well as the community. 



Sailing Club 







The Sailing Club was founded over 40 years ago by a group of students dedicated to making the beautiful Lake 
Hartwell available for recreation to the university. The club offers a learn to sail program, a race team, Fridays at Four 
group sail sessions, and social fundraising events. Sail fast, sail to chill, sail to sail. 



354 



Organizations 



Finance & Accounting Professionals 




Finance and Accounting Professionals is tor students majoring or minoring in finance and accounting. FAAP invites 
professionals in these fields to speak at open events to students. We also attend an annual conference sponsored 
by the Institute ot Management Accountants. The event changes cities each year and is a fun opportunity to listen to 
impressive people, attend seminars, and network. 



TlGEROAR 




In the fall of 1997, a tew Clemson men began a part of Clemson University history known as TIGEROAR. Sporting 
orange blazers and the famous "Tiger Rag", they were a hit from the start thanks to the direction of adviser Dr. Dan 
Rash. Since its humble beginning, TIGEROAR has grown into an fun and exciting institution at Clemson University. 



Organizations 



355 



The Tiger 




The Tiger is Clemson University's weekly campus newspaper. Distributing 10,000 papers a week, The Tiger covers 
campus news, local events, and provides student commentary. The staff consists of 25 senior staff members respon- 
sible for all aspects of production - photography, advertising, design, and editing. In addition, a junior staff of roughly 50 
writers and photographers provide content. The Tiger takes full responsibility for content, funding, and distribution of its 
product. Anyone is eligible to join the Tiger, regardless of class standing, major, or experience. The paper is distributed on 
Friday and sent to press on Wednesday night. The Tiger prints 24 papers each school year, along with a Housing Guide, 
Career Fair Guide, and the Best of Clemson. 

Tour Guide Association 




We consist of 70 members. Although all the members are volunteers, there is a very rigorous, three- round interview 
process and three month training program to become a guide. All the guides love Clemson University and want 
to inform the prospective students of all the aspects of our university that have enhanced their college experience. This 
past year we gave 1,176 tours for 30,933 people, and 14,194 people being prospective students themselves. We give tours 
Monday- Saturday at both 9:45am and 1:45pm and Sundays at 1:45pm. In the Spring we add an additional tour time at 
11:45am to accommodate the increase in campus visits we see around spring break season. 



356 



Jl 



Organizations 




CLEMSONLiVE 

CLEMSONLiVE is Clemson University's student programming board that provides free entertainment tor all under- 
graduate students. We strive to bring new and exciting events to Clemson while enhancing the quality of entertain- 
ment and activities that we offer. Our goal is to create memories tor students that will contribute to an unforgettable 
college experience. 

As one of the Big Six organizations on campus, we take great pride in selecting our members who represent us on a daily 
basis. Our general member base of 48 students holds the great responsibility o\ helping to plan, organize, and articulate 
events. Along with the 48 members, CLEMSONLiVE has 5 executive members and 7 directors. 

Some of our largest and most popular events include NiGHT of the TiGER, our annual homecoming concert for 
students and alumni, CU On Ice, an outside ice skating adventure, and Move In ck Groovin', a welcome party for all 
first-year students the night of freshman move-in. Along with these large events, we also offer weeknight stress relievers, 
campus movies, and bring unique talent to campus. 





Organizations | H 




358 H | Organizations 




TM& 



Since becoming its own organization in 1907, Taps has been a part of Clemson University's many traditions. Taps 
publishes an annual every academic year filled with information about events that occur throughout the year, athletic 
stories, information about the different academic schools, student interest stories, as well as coverage of organizations and 
of course the students themselves. Taps was formed and the first edition was published in the 1907-1908 academic school 
year. The title came from the military song, "Taps," which was played every night before lights out when Clemson was a 
military school. The annual publication has since become one of the most celebrated yearbooks in the country, winning 
prestigious awards each year. 

Today, Taps remains a student-run organization. With the completion of the Hendrix Student Center in 1999, the 
Taps office was relocated from the Edgar Allen Brown Student Union to the media suite located on the third floor 
of the student center. Taps continues to be one of the oldest traditions at Clemson University, providing a collection of 
memories that can be treasured for many years. 



s 



enior Statt 



Editor-in-Chief: Alec Gibson 

Co-Managing Editor: Brittany Bundrick 

Co-Managing Editor: Katie Simmons 

Photography Editor (Fall semester): Joshua Kelly 

Photography Editor (Spring semester): Anna Lauren Meeks 

Copy Editor: Amber Day 

Student Life Editor: Allison Kennamer 

Academics Editor: Becca Ready 

Athletics Editors: Keelia Faber and Kelsey Lundstrom 

Greeks and Organizations Editor: Katherine Williams 

Portraits Editor: Lukas Hannon 



Junior Statt 




J Lauren Beretich 


Cody Whitelock 


Anna Bokman 


Courtney Jones 


Devin Gibson 


Fatema Hakimji 


Lauren Dailey 


Katie Guest 


Kellie Hawkins 


Yahaira Aleman 


Olivia Elswick 


Averie Wood 


Jodi Williams 


Morgan Robinson 


Alix Drye 


Taylor Naquin 


Andre Friedman 


Schuyler Tin 


Carson Kohler 


Camlin Cothran 


Megan Davis 


Kevin Heimbrook 


Samantha Defino 


Matthew Bickford 



Organizations 



im 



359 




360 | ■ Clemson Undefined 



c 



emson^^ 
undefined 




It is difficult to put into words what Clemson University 
means to each student. For some, Clemson is home: a 
place where one is surrounded by friends, loved ones, 
and all the enjoyment that they can imagine. For others, 
it is a stepping stone: a way for them to move closer 
to their goals and dreams. Each person has a unique 
identity and views Clemson in a different light, so it can 
be said that Clemson has a myriad of different identities, 
each in the eye of the beholder. Because of this, it seems 
best to leave Clemson undefined and let the students be 
the representatives. 





t fact as a little child, be 
prepared to give up every preconceived 
notion, follow humbly wherever and to 
whatever abysses nature leads, or you 
shall learn nothing" 






/ 



-Thomas Hem-' 



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"In biology, nothing is clear, everything is too complicated, every- 
thing is a mess, and just when you think you understand some- 
thing, you peel off a layer and find deeper complications beneath. 

Nature is anything but simple. " 

-Richard Preston 



"Not a single one of the cells that compose you knows who you are, 



or cares. 



-Daniel Dennett 






Brittany Bundrick 



Summer Internship Kalamazoo, Ml 




Dec'1 1 Clemson Graduate! 



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I * If we spend our days waiting for fabulous roses, 
we could miss the beauty and wonder of the 
tiny forget-me-nots that are all around us. 



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Layout 

Co-Managing 'Editor 



364 



Taps Staff 





fA Anna 



Meeks 





MES 1:2- 

JOY, MY BROTHERS AhL 
ENEVER YOU FACE TRIALS OF MANY 
NDS, BECAUSE YOU KNOW THAT THE 



Tops Staff | I 365 




Every good and perfect gift is 
from above, coming down from 
the Father of the heavenly 
lights, who does not change like 
shifting shadows. James 1:17 





The longer I live the more my mind dwells 
upon the beauty and wonder of the world. 

-John Burroughs 



366 Ml Tops Staff 




Ke/VWUMViev 



"VettVtutufr ventUs r&vnoy adhibe^." 



"Man arrives as a novice at each age of his life." 
- Sebastien Chamfort 






u 



"Your work is to discover your work and then, 

with all your heart, to give yourself to it." 

- Buddha 



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tf* 



"The difference between a jogger and a 

runner is an entry blank." 

-George Sheehar 



Taps Staff 






There is something in these hills that brings together and binds together and holds together men and women 

of all persuasions, of all heights, sizes, weights, and cultural backgrounds - something that cuts across every 

difference, spans every gap, penetrates every wall - something that makes a man or a woman stand taller, feel 

better and say with a high pride to all within earshot, 

"I went to Clemson." 

-Joe Sherman 



i in niii—^ 




"I thank God for all I've been given 

At the end of every day 

I have been blessed 

With so much more than I deserve 

To be here with the ones 

That love me 

To love them so much it hurts 

I have been blessed..." 

-Martina McBride 



368 



Taps Staff 




Taps Staff 1^1 369 





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370 



Lukas Hannc 2 and Kenneth Sit n class 1 

2 




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Kelsey Lundstrom 

-Athletics Editor 




372 Taps Staff 




"So many roads, so many detours, so many choice 
so many mistakes. J4s we drive afong this road 
catted life, occasionaffy a girCwittfindherse, 
(ittfe Cost... and when that happens i guess 
to fetgo of the coukfa, shoutda, wouCda... bucfife 
up, and just kgep going. " 





"Some say it 's the good girls who 

\eep diaries. The badgirfs never have 

the time. !Me... I just wanna five a 

fife I'm gonna remember. <Even if I 

don 't write it down. " 

verie Wood J 

Sffenior Staj*?; 



Taps Staff 373 



Katelyn Guest 



the places you'll go! There is 
fun to be done! There are points to 
be scored. There are games to be 
won. And the magical things you 
can do with that ball will make you 
the winning-est winner of all." 
-Dr. Seuss, Oh, the Places You'll Go 



ilsr*^ 



" — fi H i 

Congrats to all my friends who are 
can't to tailgate with you guys as alums 




374 ■■ Tops Staff 




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Tfyllie Jfavpfyn 




376 ■ Taps Staff 







1 









Olivia Elswick 

"You dream df colors that 

have never been made, you 

image songs that have never 

been played. Only the 

curious have 

something v^ 

to find." 

Nickel Creek 





Carson *KofiCer 



"It's surprising how 
muck memory is kuift 
around things unno- 
ticed at tfie time." 

-(Barbara %ingso(ver 



378 Taps 5 





ANDRE 

FRIEDMAN 





PHOTOGR 



■■HMHHI 




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Devin Gibson 

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380 



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382 



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Letter from the Editor 




313 Hendrix Center 

Clemson, SC 29634 

www.tapsyearbook.com 



- h - n m_n_F_n_nj , u*_H_njnAj 




398 ■ I Letter from the Editor 



Dear Readers, 

It has been my honor to serve as the Editor-in-Chief of the 102 nd volume of Taps. Since 1908, 
Taps has served to preserve the memories from each year at Clemson University, making this 
yearbook one o{ the oldest traditions in Clemson's history. Each picture reveals a unique 
aspect of the past, each story represents a memory that will not be forgotten, and each 
portrait reminds us of who we once were and how far we have come. Yearbooks are not just 
fancy photo albums; they preserve the past o{ the school and the students and allow us to 
look back twenty, fifty, and sometimes even one hundred years ago to see what lite was like 
at Clemson. Taps means a great deal to numerous people, current students and alumni alike, 
and it has been my pleasure to help put together such an important part of our University. 
I would like to thank my amazing staff for working extremely hard throughout the course 
of the year. It takes a great deal of hard work and dedication to put together a yearbook, 
whether it means doing research and interviews for a story, taking pictures at events and 
locations with very short notice, or putting together pages and spreads at all hours of the 
day and night. The Taps staff is very passionate about putting together an outstanding 
yearbook and they have done an extraordinary job. The members of the Junior Staff have 
demonstrated their work ethic with the stories they have written and the consistency with 
which they have completed their office hours, and I am grateful tor all that they have done. I 
would also like to thank the editors of the Senior Staff, without whom this yearbook would 
not have been possible. They were with me every step of the way and often worked long hours 
correcting pages, editing layouts, and corresponding with staff writers. They were essential 
to the organization of the staff and to the successful completion of Taps and I cannot 
thank them enough for all of their hard work. In addition, this book would not have been 
completed without the help and support of Claude Saleeby, Tim Ross, and the rest of the 
Jostens staff, and I thank them for all that they have given us. Finally, I would like to thank 
the students, faculty, staff, and alumni of Clemson University. You are the ones supporting 
Taps and providing us with a reason to produce our yearbooks. You, the reader, are the 
reason we work so hard year long to produce a quality publication. I hope that this yearbook 
remains with you throughout the course of your life and continues to serve as a reminder of 
the wonderful years you have spent here at Clemson. I sincerely thank you for your interest in 
Taps and hope that you continue to enjoy the memories that are preserved in this yearbook. 



Alec Gibson 



2012 Taps Editor-in-Chief 



Letter from the Editor I ■ 399 



(^JDLOPHON 

General 

Volume 102 of Taps, the official yearbook of Clemson University, contains 400 pages. 1,700 copies were 
printed, and the price of each book was $85. 

Production 

Six Apple iMacs, one Mac Pro, and one MacBook Pro were used to create this edition of Taps. Page layouts 
were designed used Adobe InDesign CS4, and Adobe Photoshop CS4 & Lightroom 2 were used for photo 
editing. 

Cover and Endsheets 

The cover was designed by Alec Gibson with help from Jostens and Jon Welker. The endsheets were designed 
by Jostens and Jon Welker. 

Type 

The primary fonts of the book were Goudy Old Style, Zapfino Extra LTX Pro, and Century Gothic. The 

body copy was 11.5 point Goudy Old Style Regular, captions were 10 point Goudy Old Style Regular, and 
the photo credits were 10 point Goudy Old Style Italic. 

Printing 

The book was printed by Jostens of Clarksville, TN. Claude Saleeby, of Spartanburg, SC was the company 
representative and Tim Ross was the plant consultant. 

Studio Photography 

Carl Wolf Studios was contracted to take all portrait photos. Classic Photography provided the group 
sorority photos used in the Greeks & Orgs section. 

Photography 

The photographs in the book were taken by the Taps photography staff with a Nikon D90 SLR, as well as the 
Office of Creative Services. 

Advertising 

Advertisements were sold and designed by Campus Ad, Co. 



No portion of this book may be reproduced, published, or used in promotion without the permission of the Taps Editor- 
in-Chief or the Student Media Adviser. The content of this book does not necessarily represent the views of Clemson 
University. 



a 



400 ■■ Colophc 



J 



Where the Blue Ridge yawns its greatness, 

Where the Tigers Play, 

Here the sons of dear old Clemson 

Reign supreme alway. 

Chorus 

Dear old Clemson we will triumph, 

And with all our might, 

That the Tiger's roar may echo 

O'er the mountain height. 

We will dream of greater conquests 

For our past is grand. 

And her sons have fought and conquered 

Every foreign land. 



Where the mountains smile in grandeur 

O'er the hill and dale, 

Here the Tiger lair is nestling 

Swept by storm and gale. 

We are brothers strong in manhood, 

For we wok and strive. 

And our Alma Mater reigneth 

Ever in our lives. 





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